View Full Version : Son just diagnosed....afraid of meds!


CM1424
01-08-16, 05:54 PM
My 12 year old son was just diagnosed with ADD. Funny thing though is that the teachers answers on the Vanderbilt form did not match mine. Part of me still believes my son just dislikes school and that is the reason for the behaviors. However, if I can help him to be a better student and behave better at school I am all for it for his future success. He does not fail his classes but staying on task and getting work done (including homework) is a constant struggle.

He is also leaps and bounds less mature than his peers which is concerning. Tends to "annoy" others including his only sibling who despises him. This year (7th grade) he's at his worst. Multiple detentions for being disruptive, butting heads with a certain teacher constantly, and many missing homework assignments.

When I told him he has ADD his immediate response was "can I please take medication so I can do good at school". Only problem is that the meds scare the bejeezes out of me. He is already on daily meds for asthma and I hate it. I also worry because he is very tiny for his age being only in the 5th percentile for height and weight.

Can someone ease my fears please? I don't want him to wither away from loss of appetite or his heart to stop beating, (yes I read side effects) and scare myself to death. Pedi mentioned Adderall, Ritalin, and Concerta.

dvdnvwls
01-08-16, 07:33 PM
Welcome to the forum!

You need to know that there are lots of people writing things on the internet who make themselves sound respectable but whose real agenda is to scare mothers. Some of them write their scare stories because their religious leaders tell them to. Others write scare stories because they mistakenly believe every kind of medication is always harmful, and they aren't shy about lying to you in order to rid the world of what they think is such a menace.

The manufacturers are required by law to list every single thing that ever happened while someone was taking those drugs during the testing phase. The possibilities of those catastrophes happening range from remote to zero.

The truth about side effects for your particular son is this: when he takes any of these meds you will have to give him help and support (especially at first) to make sure he is eating his breakfast and his lunch, and that his meals are big enough and healthy enough to support his development. You will also have to be patient and do your best to stay calm in the first few months while the doctor analyzes your son's reactions to medication and adjusts the dosage accordingly. The rest you can really ignore. These medications have been around for decades, they work, and they aren't harmful.

Adderall is one type.

Ritalin and Concerta are the other type - they are both really the same drug (methylphenidate) inside, but Concerta is longer lasting.

Both types of medication are reliable, trusted, and safe. Either type is very likely to work; follow your doctor's guidance on which to try first. I wish I had had one of them when I was a kid. (I wasn't diagnosed till I was over 40 and my marriage collapsed.)

All of these medications exit the body completely within three days after a person stops taking them. There is no harm in trying; if your son has a strong negative reaction, go back to the doctor and tell them. If the medication really fails, the doctor will simply have your son quit taking it, and all will be back to normal within a very short time.


Basically, what I'm saying is that your son is right. :)

sarahsweets
01-09-16, 08:31 AM
http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=145739

Read this thread I wrote. Its my whole story with my son and its easier than junking up your thread with a long post.

Lunacie
01-09-16, 01:06 PM
Well spotted about the lack of maturity. Another reading assignment ... :giggle:

A sticky thread, start with The 30% Rule in particular. http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=60130

Doctors have concluded that kids with ADHD really are about 30% behind their peers in maturity.

wearethechange
01-10-16, 04:48 AM
My son has been diagnosed with adhd and I feel that the school strong armed me into putting him on meds. He was on medication for one year without any positive results. 3 months ago I started giving him a supplement that includes a bunch of omega 3s and other nutrients everyone's body is lacking. Surprisingly I have been able to stop giving him his meds without the school noticing, except for the fact that he is doing better in school! I don't know if it will help your family or not but it has helped mine.

sarahsweets
01-11-16, 05:34 AM
My son has been diagnosed with adhd and I feel that the school strong armed me into putting him on meds. He was on medication for one year without any positive results. 3 months ago I started giving him a supplement that includes a bunch of omega 3s and other nutrients everyone's body is lacking. Surprisingly I have been able to stop giving him his meds without the school noticing, except for the fact that he is doing better in school! I don't know if it will help your family or not but it has helped mine.

No one should ever allow a school to give medical advice. If you saw a doctor then it wouldnt matter what the school said. The supplements you speak of have just as sketchy of a history as the meds you are complaining about.

Lunacie
01-11-16, 01:07 PM
No one should ever allow a school to give medical advice. If you saw a doctor then it wouldnt matter what the school said. The supplements you speak of have just as sketchy of a history as the meds you are complaining about.

I don't know about any 'other nutrients', but there have been studies done that show Omega 3 to be effective as treatment for ADHD.

And it certainly has been of benefit for me and a couple of others on this forum.

But I agree that schools should not give medical advice. All they should do is report whether they are seeing improvements or any decline.

Tmoney
01-12-16, 09:56 AM
Just from my personal experience if I didn't have medication during my school years I would not have made it. Diagnosed severe AD(H)D at age 6, I wouldn't stop moving long enough to eat or use the bathroom. They tried to tell my mom that I couldn't read and wanted to stick me in a special class. My mom says he reads, but only things he is interested in.

I know medication may not be for everyone. I have been on medication for 46 years. I have changed and modified them over the years so to get the maximum support available. I have stopped taking meds during my years but it did not go well.

For me I have to take meds. I have accepted it and at 52 years of age diagnosed with AD(H)D, depression and anxiety and I am healthy, happy, and that's all I could ask for.

I wish good things for you.

BellaVita
01-12-16, 10:30 AM
My son has been diagnosed with adhd and I feel that the school strong armed me into putting him on meds. He was on medication for one year without any positive results. 3 months ago I started giving him a supplement that includes a bunch of omega 3s and other nutrients everyone's body is lacking. Surprisingly I have been able to stop giving him his meds without the school noticing, except for the fact that he is doing better in school! I don't know if it will help your family or not but it has helped mine.

Sorry to say this but there is no such thing as "everyone's body is lacking" - most people are actually not vitamin deficient unless they have some sort of specific condition.

Sounds like he just needed a different medication or a different dose.

Bethylphenidate
01-12-16, 10:34 AM
Ahh, what the heck, I'll toss in my 2 cents.

When I was 12 years old, I was in the opposite position of your son: I chose to stop taking medication. (Yes, I went through the "proper channels," etc.) Looking back, did I make the right decision? What about the adults whose care I was under? Did they make the right decision?

I'm sure that I was probably, at least partially misinformed and motivated to go "med-free" for the wrong reasons. On the other hand, at 12, I think I was capable of understanding the situation to a considerable extent.

You won't find me advocating or recommending prescription medication because I personally chose not to take it for several reasons. Having said that, I've seen medication help countless individuals drastically. The fact that this forum exists, is a testament to the fact that ADHD medications aren't wiping us off the Earth. :cool: I've also seen an obscene amount of pseudoscience and fear-mongering information, particularly on the internet but offline as well. That's why research is so important. It's exhausting and tedious and confusing and conflicting, but ADHD isn't going anywhere! It's not a college course we can blow off.

If your son is asking to take medication, perhaps it's something to at least consider?

This is an issue I face even today ("To medicate or not to medicate?"), and I'm almost 30. While I've chosen not to take medication, I'd be lying if I said the thought doesn't cross my mind occasionally. I struggle with ADHD as much as anyone who takes medication, so for someone to deny me of a full range of treatment options (i.e. going on medication if I feel the need) would... well, I wouldn't like that very much, lol.

I think ultimately it's about what's best for him. I am very understanding of your viewpoint, but I also think every individual with ADHD should be able to make these decisions for themselves (or at least have a say if they're minors).

I hope that doesn't sound preachy or know-it-all or anything.

I think the point I'm trying to make here is that while I don't feel comfortable giving you a "A is right and B is wrong" answer, I think it's critical to really give this some heavy research. You might ultimately decide to go the medication route; you might not.

sarahsweets
01-12-16, 11:40 AM
I should have clarified Lunacie, Omega 3's have been found to work for adhd, for myself as well. The combo of meds and omega 3's has been a lifesaver and I can always tell when I havent taken my omega 3's. I was referring to all the other disproven nonsense that its typical of that agenda.

I don't know about any 'other nutrients', but there have been studies done that show Omega 3 to be effective as treatment for ADHD.

And it certainly has been of benefit for me and a couple of others on this forum.

But I agree that schools should not give medical advice. All they should do is report whether they are seeing improvements or any decline.

sarahsweets
01-12-16, 11:47 AM
When I was 12 years old, I was in the opposite position of your son: I chose to stop taking medication. (Yes, I went through the "proper channels," etc.) Looking back, did I make the right decision? What about the adults whose care I was under? Did they make the right decision?

I'm sure that I was probably, at least partially misinformed and motivated to go "med-free" for the wrong reasons. On the other hand, at 12, I think I was capable of understanding the situation to a considerable extent.

I totally get this. All three of my kids are adhd. My Son who is 19 now chose to stop taking meds in the summer between freshman and sophmore year. He had taken a break and when he resumed them he said he didnt like the way they made him feel. And my daughter who is 15, she decided during 8th grade she didnt want stimulants anymore for the same reason as my son. However she does take clonidine and vistaril for adhd and anxiety.
My youngest could never tolerate meds. We tried and I have to say It was so easy with the other two I was disappointed. She has clinical depression and anxiety disorder as well, so it was thought that the stimulants affected her mood to negatively. I have always believed that when children are old enough, you can force them to take medication. They need to go through periods of time where they feel in control of certain things. If we were talking about something that would keep them alive, thats different but I can imagine the battle I would have if I forced my 15 year old to take meds. I do hope they reconsider when they are older and are interested in the science behind it, but if not, they are great kids anyhow.