View Full Version : Childhood symptoms for someone with ADHD-I or PI


Toss4n
01-20-16, 05:36 AM
So what kind of a child were you? And how did the symptoms manifest? Just wondering if the childhood-symptoms of ADHD-PI are different from those with ADHD. :eyebrow:

Personally I didn't show much hyperactivity, and was more of a thinker-type (constantly thinking and analyzing stuff, which made me walk into stuff and not really pay much attention or interest to stuff going on around me). Loved to play video games and watch movies for hours. Never had the patience for reading (fell asleep. Didn't read my first book until I was about 9). Still don't read that much and in my lifetime I think I have read less than 30 books (can't for the life of me remember anything about any of them though). Always tired when I got home from school, and had to sleep (started at about age of 10). Focusing on school was boring unless I found it challenging (I basically worked on math problems that no one else could solve until I got it). Never did my homework on time (except for math as this was so easy, but even then I didn't always do it). Writing didn't come easy for me (until I was about 9 or 10). Had good grades. Didn't act out (except for a few times). Sometimes blurted out answers before the rest, because I was impatient. I also had little patience for those that were slower to learn. Was always in a rush to finish things and made a lot of careless mistakes because I didn't stop to think (still do). Felt like I had to take on much more responsibility than normal for my age (had to keep track of everything myself and you can guess how well that worked out :p). Had a hard time keeping track of my stuff and usually ended up leaving a bunch behind. Always forgot important dates (for games and such - continues to this day, but now I have a smartphone with a calendar which helps!).

So is it possible to have adhd-pi even if you weren't showing signs of hyperactivity and/or lack of emotional inhibition as a child? According to some articles I found online it is, while according to others it isn't. My psychiatrist thinks I managed to get by due to being smarter than average and developing coping-mechanisms (still use these today). So what do you think - yay or nay?

Zenod_ADHDi
01-24-16, 05:09 PM
That's sooooo me. Except reading part, read over 500 books. Take an IQ test at a neuropsychology clinic, you might be gifted. 130+ IQ (gifted).. You compensate for the ADHD. Somewhat. I recently was diagnosed ADHD-impulsivity/inattention and 149 IQ. That IQ comes with a bunch of pros and cons. Blurt out answers, think too much, too fast, overthink everything (all the time). Bet you don't sleep that many hours. Hypersensitivity. Perfectionnist. Make jokes to humor people, try to fit with everyone. Gifted has its perks, and also downsides. Criticism hurts you, sometimes social skills lack, you feel like the world and everyone around you is slow, you doubt every "expert" and do your own research about what interests you, etc etc. Do a lot, fast, and also make more mistakes, but still do "more" than everyone. Plus the IQ test is really fun :)

Toss4n
01-25-16, 06:21 AM
That's sooooo me. Except reading part, read over 500 books. Take an IQ test at a neuropsychology clinic, you might be gifted. 130+ IQ (gifted).. You compensate for the ADHD. Somewhat. I recently was diagnosed ADHD-impulsivity/inattention and 149 IQ. That IQ comes with a bunch of pros and cons. Blurt out answers, think too much, too fast, overthink everything (all the time). Bet you don't sleep that many hours. Hypersensitivity. Perfectionnist. Make jokes to humor people, try to fit with everyone. Gifted has its perks, and also downsides. Criticism hurts you, sometimes social skills lack, you feel like the world and everyone around you is slow, you doubt every "expert" and do your own research about what interests you, etc etc. Do a lot, fast, and also make more mistakes, but still do "more" than everyone. Plus the IQ test is really fun :)
Thanks for answering! I took an IQ test when I was 18 I think and scored 134 if I remember correctly. I was just really bored with the test and wasn't really that interested (especially during the last parts because it was so long!). I'm seeing my psychiatrist today and going to let him know I want to do the tests privately and pay for them myself. I could have them done for free, but that would cost me 5 months of my life that I would never get back, so 750 doesn't feel that much in comparison (and I would likely be yelled at for seeking drugs etc., even though I don't even drink alcohol and have had drug-tests done already that came back negative). :p I just don't really trust the tests, and believe that the only real test for adhd-pi is trying stimulants to see if they work (not sure how to tell though as most of them seem to help even those that don't suffer). I have been prescribed lyrica and opamox (weak benzo) without any issues, but the former was absolutely the worst medication I've ever taken and had horrible withdrawal-symptons after only a week of use, and the latter just made me feel like a complete airhead/zombie, so I have stopped both. Voxra also gave me horrible brainfog (quite common for all ADs that increase norepinephrine). Going to be interesting to see what AD he prescribes for me next. :lol: And I sincerely thank you for responding, and would definitely be interested in hearing more of how your symptoms of ADHD manifested during your childhood years as we seem to have a lot in common! :thankyou:

Fuzzy12
01-25-16, 07:03 AM
I was definitely not a hyperactive child, which is the main reason why I still doubt my diagnosis. I was very quiet, shy and reserved. Very dreamy. I spent most of my time reading, playing quietly with my teddies or just day dreaming. I don't even remember being very inattentive. That started later, around age 12. I breezed through primary school. I actually enjoyed learning. :scratch:

Sigh...good times :)

Mostly :scratch:

Toss4n
01-25-16, 07:27 AM
I was definitely not a hyperactive child, which is the main reason why I still doubt my diagnosis. I was very quiet, shy and reserved. Very dreamy. I spent most of my time reading, playing quietly with my teddies or just day dreaming. I don't even remember being very inattentive. That started later, around age 12. I breezed through primary school. I actually enjoyed learning. :scratch:

I was very much the same, except that I quickly learned to feign interest in a lot of things, just because I knew they were important, even though it didn't feel like that to me (sound like a pscyhopath :p). I still feel like I fake most of my feelings, and being interested in what other people do - it all just feels so trivial to me sometimes.

Fuzzy12
01-25-16, 07:30 AM
I was very much the same, except that I quickly learned to feign interest in a lot of things, just because I knew they were important, even though it didn't feel like that to me (sound like a pscyhopath :p). I still feel like I fake most of my feelings, and being interested in what other people do - it all just feels so trivial to me sometimes.

When I got a bit older that was my overriding feeling .. or thought: how trivial everything was. I struggled to fake interest though. In primary school I was genuinely interested in everything. Later I struggled to focus when things became less than interesting...both in school and socially.

Nala94
01-25-16, 02:15 PM
I have never been hyperactive either. As a kid I think I can relate to a lot of what others have said. Quite, reserved, yet constantly thinking about something. I did moderately well in primary school with the exception of math. I could never grasp on to basic math facts. I excelled in secondary school, but had a lot of help, and math was easier once it was more about solving long equations than basic arithmetic, and the miracle of calculators! (thank God for partial credit though because I always make careless mistakes).

I loved to read though, maybe because I wasn't allowed to play video games and as an only child it gave me something to do and an "escape." I definitely grew up in the Harry Potter generation. I have to add though, that I only read books that interested me. I had a wide range of interests, anything fiction for the most part. But if I don't like the book I'm reading, I can't get through it.

Struggled a lot through college which finally resulted in a diagnosis last summer... now to make up my GPA with one semester left :umm1:

sarahsweets
01-25-16, 05:24 PM
Me as a kid: fidgeting, foot tapping, hair twirling, distractible yet always in everyone's business, impulsive, behavior issues,emotional outbursts both angry and tears, wise as* etc.
Me as an adult:
The exact same stuff only more adult.

BellaVita
01-25-16, 06:04 PM
Me as a child:
Daydreamy, "airhead", naive, black-and-white thinker, detail-oriented, need for routine, intense interest in a couple topics, trouble sleeping, didn't hear people talking to me apparently, very hyperactive, meltdowns (crying/screaming and often mixed with throwing things/kicking things/breaking things for 6+ hours),literal thinker, poor social skills, weak central coherence, bad with following verbal instructions, rocking,hand flapping, spent lots of time lining up my toys, in my own little world, did extremely well in school as far as grades go but it took hours for me to get homework done, didn't talk to anyone except my mom for first several years and later years people were like "she can talk???"

As an adult:
Pretty much the same symptoms. Haven't changed much symptom-wise and brain-wise except a few things and added a few issues:

I'm more logical/rational and meltdowns aren't *as* frequent and I've learned not to break things. Anxiety is much worse, + I have C-PTSD and OCD. I also try to consciously be less of a black-and-white thinker although I still have issues with that. More mentally mature. Oh, and I can't drive, and my executive functioning is poor. But I do have strong will power, always have, so that helps I guess.

But, I'm much happier where I am now even though things can be tough at times. :)

dvdnvwls
01-25-16, 07:18 PM
The "faking your feelings" problem can come from a few different sources; here are two:

- emotional dysregulation: your emotions are often the wrong "size", so that you might sometimes feel extreme emotion over unimportant things and feel no emotion when important things happen

- alexithymia: you have emotions but you don't know what they're called or can't explain them

Cyllya
01-28-16, 01:26 AM
A small amount or lack of hyperactivity is the whole idea behind ADHD-PI, isn't it?

I've always been inclined to pace and fidget, but I never had anywhere near impairment-level hyperactivity.

Zenod_ADHDi
01-29-16, 09:27 AM
Thanks for answering! I took an IQ test when I was 18 I think and scored 134 if I remember correctly. I was just really bored with the test and wasn't really that interested (especially during the last parts because it was so long!). I'm seeing my psychiatrist today and going to let him know I want to do the tests privately and pay for them myself. I could have them done for free, but that would cost me 5 months of my life that I would never get back, so 750 doesn't feel that much in comparison (and I would likely be yelled at for seeking drugs etc., even though I don't even drink alcohol and have had drug-tests done already that came back negative). :p I just don't really trust the tests, and believe that the only real test for adhd-pi is trying stimulants to see if they work (not sure how to tell though as most of them seem to help even those that don't suffer). I have been prescribed lyrica and opamox (weak benzo) without any issues, but the former was absolutely the worst medication I've ever taken and had horrible withdrawal-symptons after only a week of use, and the latter just made me feel like a complete airhead/zombie, so I have stopped both. Voxra also gave me horrible brainfog (quite common for all ADs that increase norepinephrine). Going to be interesting to see what AD he prescribes for me next. :lol: And I sincerely thank you for responding, and would definitely be interested in hearing more of how your symptoms of ADHD manifested during your childhood years as we seem to have a lot in common! :thankyou:



Sorry for the late response!! There are two threads I've made and I think you might be gifted! An IQ over 130 with a 2% error is usually what that means, and you might recognize yourself in some characteristics and behavior I've enumerated! Honestly I'm somewhat excited because the revelation learning I was gifted changed my life brutally. Particular strengths and weaknesses that I feel you might relate to!

Here's one: http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=174740
And two! : http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=174760

We definitely can discuss this further (I'm trying to find gifted people with similar age/interests) and I could tell you more about the books the neuropsy made me read, they're astonishingly accurate. It basically was like reading a book about myself, my childhood, academic problems, my behavior, etc... Totally crazy.

LaTizi
01-30-16, 08:48 AM
When I've been diagnosed with ADD-inattentive, the symptoms from childhood were similar to the ones that you describe, and they have been considered as a part of the diagnosis by the psychiatrist... for sure, I didn't have hyperactivity and I was very inhibited emotionally. Shy, daydreaming, and I needed a lot of sleep to be a bit more "alive".

Even in my case, they said that I have developed coping mechanisms, that I am somehow "compensated" (even if this implies being under a constant, tiring, stressful effort... I also have a subtle chronic anxiety/worriness from this, I am never ever relaxed).

So in my case those childhood traits have been one of the reasons for the diagnosis, and not one to doubt about it...

Zenod_ADHDi
01-30-16, 10:29 AM
When I've been diagnosed with ADD-inattentive, the symptoms from childhood were similar to the ones that you describe, and they have been considered as a part of the diagnosis by the psychiatrist... for sure, I didn't have hyperactivity and I was very inhibited emotionally. Shy, daydreaming, and I needed a lot of sleep to be a bit more "alive".

Even in my case, they said that I have developed coping mechanisms, that I am somehow "compensated" (even if this implies being under a constant, tiring, stressful effort... I also have a subtle chronic anxiety/worriness from this, I am never ever relaxed).

So in my case those childhood traits have been one of the reasons for the diagnosis, and not one to doubt about it...



Order some ashwagandha extrct and rhodiola rosea extract from amazon, you'll notice a significant decrease in anxiety and stress :)

Jayfer
02-01-16, 07:16 PM
I'm as yet undiagnosed, but I was a daydreamer with emotional problems as a kid. I read early and often (and often got in trouble for reading in classes I thought were boring. Even if they took the book away, I would just look out the window.) I said things I still regret to one of my favorite teachers in an emotional outburst.

I probably count as "gifted," though my spaceyness and emotional instability, combined with my terrible grades, meant I was not identified. (My brother was identified gifted and "hyper.") I took a side-route to college (part time while in the military) and stuck with subjects that I could ace while doing all of my papers the night before they were due. I did my grad school while also working two jobs, so I'm pretty sure adrenaline is the main reason I finished successfully. I crashed and burned in my second academic job, though.

I have a lot of anxiety, I have depression, and I don't sleep well (delayed sleep phase.) Funny thing is, it took me until about two weeks ago to seriously think undiagnosed ADHD could be the root of my problems.

My whole life is compensation and coping mechanisms.

At_the_Bridge
02-16-16, 02:34 AM
I recommend that people interested in discovering whether others observed symptoms of their ADD early on request their own elementary school records.

Six years ago my self-diagnosis of ADD-PI was confirmed by a psychiatrist. A few years later it occurred to me to find out if any of my elementary school teachers had noted in my academic records that I'd behaved then in a way that could now suggest ADD-PI. I was in elementary school in the nineteen fifties, long before ADD of any sort was recognized, and I didn't realize myself until I was 59 yrs old that that had to have been the cause of my life-long forgetfulness, inattention, and social awkwardness. Until then, the little I knew of ADD was that it was apparently a condition that only hyperactive young children unable to control themselves in the classroom had.

Anyway, I requested those school records, and here was what they said:

Five and a half years old
Individualistic in group attitude
Seeks attention

Six years old
Still very individualistic
Individual in all actions
Has a very vivid imagination

Seven years old
Does not pay attention to directions.
Must be told too many times.
Very restless

Eight years old
Lacks concentration.
Must be kept after to get him to
accomplish class plans

The above comments seem to be observations of forgetfulness (“must be told too many times” and “must be kept after to get him to accomplish class plans”), inattentiveness (“does not pay attention to directions” and “lacks concentration”), and possible hyperactivity (“seeks attention” and “very restless”). Also, repeated references to being “individualistic” could refer to relatively poor social skills and/or my reluctance to participate in group activities in favor of walking by myself along the fence that surrounded the schoolyard, lost in my own imaginary world. I recall that these were problems of mine in later years at school (minus the walks). The hyperactivity seems to have disappeared as I grew older, or at least I don't ever recall my parents or other adults reprimanding me as I grew older for restlessness or attention-seeking.