View Full Version : Self Employment


Ilovecats79
01-21-16, 04:10 AM
I've technically been self employed on and off since 2009 and animal care, pet sitting and house sitting have been the main areas I've worked in.

As much as I love animals, I no longer find the joy in the actual work so I've decided to stop altogether and just love them as companions rather than make a living from it.

Now I've decided to focus on creative writing, jewellery making, painting and art photography and I hope to make a living from all of those things combined by next year..

I've worked in conventional jobs like aged care nursing, sales, customer service, disability care and even cleaning but none of it's really worked out for the long-term and due to increased anxiety working from home with very flexible hours may be my best option yet....

Do you guys have any stories that you might like to share?

Sel :)

dvdnvwls
01-21-16, 04:50 AM
I know one thing for sure:

Everyone has their own skills, and their own needs and preferences. If you end up with your needs being met, your skills being used, and enough of your preferences satisfied in order to keep you fairly happy, then you've got it right, and no one can argue with you.


The rest, I don't know for sure. :D But I'll try to say a couple of things.

Sit down (alone or with someone, your choice) and really prove to yourself that in your situation, making enough money at the combination of things you listed is likely. You may end up saying, "It's likely, as long as X and Y happen". If so, then make X and Y happen as soon as you can.

And know what you'll do next if you're doing your new work and find that you're not making enough money. Knowing (for sure, not a guess) exactly how everything will be all right, is important - because then you won't be feeling insecure and second-guessing yourself in your new work, and you'll be able to concentrate on doing good work instead of worrying about a lot of what-ifs.

Unmanagable
01-21-16, 09:39 AM
Just be sure whatever you are offering is what you wish to fill most of your waking time with. Otherwise, don't commit. And I've learned once I HAVE to do something, it no longer seems nearly as pleasant as when I was casually doing it because I wanted to vs. having that damn lingering expectation of another over my head.

I haven't attempted to operate an actual full blown business, yet, outside of crafting, pet sitting, and doing a small amount of non-medical care giving. But those didn't require me to have an official business front/license, and I didn't make enough doing those things to have to pay taxes on it. (that word alone freaks me out)

I just started a business planning class last night. It'll last 8 weeks and by the time it's over, I'll have a living breathing business plan shaped around my ideas to work with.

This class has a total of 6 students, so far, and we get to help each other build up our individual ideas, from whatever stage of development they are in, while listening to others share the wisdom of their experiences, their expertise in the legal arena, taxation arena, marketing arena, etc., etc.

It's forcing me to look at the big picture, while allowing wide open creative potential, providing valuable feedback from a diverse group I would not have otherwise sought out, with all the unpleasantness of the technical and financial processes included, so I'll be able to better decide if I'm pursuing something attainable, sustainable, and more importantly, that my sensitivities can handle the reality of my current dreams.

It comes at a cost of $150 for 8 weeks, but after pricing individual classes that address each category it covers, I'd not be able to take classes at the local community college any cheaper, ever.

And, it helps me make a much more realistic and educated choice. Once you take a class with them, they also provide free ongoing consultations/counseling for brain storming, problem solving, mentoring, etc. I'll take all the help I can get.

Socaljaxs
01-21-16, 11:52 AM
Now I've decided to focus on creative writing, jewellery making, painting and art photography and I hope to make a living from all of those things combined by next year..

I've worked in conventional jobs like aged care nursing, sales, customer service, disability care and even cleaning but none of it's really worked out for the long-term and due to increased anxiety working from home with very flexible hours may be my best option yet....

Do you guys have any stories that you might like to share?

Sel :)

Not sure what stories specifically you are asking about?

I've pretty much since college only had my jobs as work from homes or not in an office position(I prefer it) and recently as of last year took a leap, to self employment. Granted, that self employment was supposed to be a partnership with my mom and I as team real estate agents. She had been a real estate agent since 1988 and her and I were doing it together.l. Now however it is just me, following our dream.

But from the help I'm receiving thus far( lots of top producers t the company are reaching,out to help me live out my moms dream. My new motivation is,the promise I made to her to be s top producer at the company. But they all have said to narrow down your plan of attack. Don't try to do everyone all at one, pick what you like and get rid of the rest. So my advice to you is narrow down what you want to do, and pick the one that has the most potential to have lasting results that you would want to do long term.

dvdnvwls
01-21-16, 04:32 PM
I agree with Unmanagable's point that an occupation can seem so attractive until you have to do it - or else - and then it doesn't seem so attractive anymore.

The kinds of work you are describing are ones where your work has to get known and liked before it will generate a lot of sales. It will probably take more than a year to develop into a business that makes good money. Also, none of them are things that need a year's full focus to be able to pull them off. I'd like to suggest that you search for a conventional job now, to partly support yourself while you are also doing one or more of the things you described, and then quit the conventional job when business really picks up on your own things.