View Full Version : Getting Disability & Medicaid Coverage - Any Tips??


sbcy
01-25-16, 03:39 PM
I'm going to be applying for medicaid and also see if I can get on "disability" or whatever they call it in the state of Illinois. I heard from a family friend that one of their 20-something children diagnosed with ADD by a physician was able to get medicaid for a while but didn't qualify for disability because the state people evaluated them as only having "30% ADD" despite their prior diagnosis and significant troubles in school and work.

How can I improve my chances of receiving a "100%" to qualify for disability? In addition to ADD, I've also been diagnosed with mild to moderate: OCD, generalized anxiety disorder and social phobia. I have had extensive psychiatric treatment & testing by qualified physicians with little improvement since I was a teenager, I'm now 26 years old. I've also struggled a lot in school (though my grades don't really show it thanks to countless hours of extra pain unless you count the fact that I take very small course loads) and have a disability/special services card at the college I attended last year (taking this semester off).

sarahsweets
01-25-16, 05:21 PM
I am on disability but the primary reason is bipolar with the secondary reason being adhd. Not sure if adhd can be considered a primary for disability.

namazu
01-25-16, 05:32 PM
Although it's possible that ADHD could be considered a primary disability, it's not common for adults to qualify on the basis of ADHD alone. As Sarahsweets suggested, it's more common to qualify if you have comorbid conditions, especially conditions that are automatically considered "severe". However, since you also have OCD, generalized anxiety disorder, and social anxiety, the combination may be found to be disabling, even if the ADHD alone would not be sufficient to qualify you.

Be aware that the process is set up in a way that makes it difficult for many applicants to qualify, especially the first time around. Many claims are denied. However, there are organizations that can provide advocates to help you through the paperwork and appeals process, if necessary.

On another track... Have you been in touch at all with Illinois' Department of Vocational Rehabilitation (http://www.dhs.state.il.us/page.aspx?item=29737)?

If there's a possibility you could be able to work (with some support and accommodations in the job-seeking process and while you're employed), they may be able to help out. (Again, there tend to be more people needing services than Voc Rehab can actually serve at any given time, so they tend to prioritize in terms of some assessment of severity of disability/likelihood to benefit from services.)

In some states (I don't know about Illinois, but this was true in California), Voc Rehab departments may also help with college expenses or funding for certain accommodations (like assistive technology), if those things are directly linked to your employment goals (say, obtaining a college degree to qualify for a career in X field).

Best wishes finding your way and dealing with the bureaucracies involved.

Little Missy
01-25-16, 07:54 PM
Your docs would need to confirm your disabilities as indefinite and you'll need all of your medical records from everything. Literally, everything.

InvitroCanibal
01-29-16, 07:54 AM
You have to file prior to age 22. You need strong detailings and evidence of it being a disability. In this case it would not be considered adhd. It'd be listed as mild cognitive impairment.

Mood disorders can be filed for with less hassle but cognitive issues must be well documented.


Treatment in an outpatient program may be deemed mandatory to recieve SSI benefits. There are meds,only options but that requires some evaluations.

Beyond that, you can only work a certain number of hours a week or you can not recieve your monies. Your case manager will be rude, busy, and answer very few questions.

Housing can be more affordable. Jobs will be easy to find but hard to keep, given they will discriminate against you.

Well that is how it is for my state. I help walk peopke through the disability system as well as the mental health system. It can be different but from what I can tell it just makes people feel worthless and limited. I'd caution you only do it if you really really need it. There is an emotional toll no one expects and few admit. But maybe thats just in this state.

I wish you luck