View Full Version : food, diet, supplements


acdc01
01-26-16, 09:53 AM
I've been reading unmanageable talk about changes in diet that helped minimize ADHD symptoms.

So I've been wondering if I should make some changes as well as I gave up on pills (too many bad side effects). But I'm not exactly sure what changes I should make.

For those of you who feel like they've figured out a good diet for themselves, what is it you eat in a typical day? What foods should we eat and what should we avoid?

I'm asking for both ADHD and sleeping cause I seem to be having difficulties with that too these days.

Little Missy
01-26-16, 10:28 AM
Unsy's plan involves plenty of work or prep time but I believe it really works! I go salt free and nothing processed and take my meds and rarely eat meat. I don't care about side effects anymore. I take them to insure that my compulsivity remains in check and that I'm a responsible with my money and dependable.

Unmanagable
01-26-16, 10:42 AM
There's no blanket answer that will work for all, unfortunately. But many peeps make big money off of that wish.

The basics of what I've done is to switch to a strict plant-based diet, remembering all of the energies and toxicity I absorbed when choosing meat, dairy, eggs, and most grain products.

I also no longer use or ingest synthetically created products of any kind, if and when I can possibly avoid it, and exercise is the first thing I do each day, which is brand new in my world, as I used to never exercise on purpose.

For me, learning about mucus and pus forming foods, the VOC content of non-edible items, learning what those ingredients that I can't pronounce really are, learning about digestive enzymes and the whole digestive process and what interrupts vs. nurtures it, learning more about my own excrement and how to better gauge my digestive health, how to healthily eliminate foods we eat, learning about mucoid plaque and how it builds up, discovering the effects of food combining and learning you are not to be consuming liquids with foods or meats with starches, etc., learned of the effects that cooked food vs. raw food has on our digestive system, and how our innards are best fueled based on our actual physical needs and/or struggles, which can often be better determined via blood work, nutrient/vitamin levels testing, etc.

It's been a full-time job figuring it all out for myself. It continues to be, although the routine becomes easier the longer I practice it.

I used to eat a high protein (animal protein) breakfast each day, consume massive amounts of tea and coffee with sweeteners and creamers, eat a big lunch that typically involved breads and more animal proteins with maybe a veggie or two on my sandwich, then another big dinner with even more animal proteins and a few veggies, then a dessert of some type filled with sugars, salts, and flours, then a late night snack that was usually dairy and sugar filled ice cream.

I had even worked closely with a registered dietitian who was in full support of my dietary choices at the time, supporting the high protein myth. Especially since I chose local meats, dairy, and eggs. They were supposedly the "healthier" option, at the time. However, I still felt like s*** daily, had little to no energy once my food settled, still couldn't lose any weight, and was left baffled with continuing aches and pains and digestive issues, yet again.

Now, I wake each day to 3 quarts of water, have hot "tea" which consists of steeping fresh ginger slices and an herb of my choice (stinging nettles, lambs quarter, lemon balm, apple mint, or catnip, etc.), and sometimes will also sip on organic fruit juice of the apple or tart cherry variety. No food for the first couple of hours.

Then I make my juice which usually consists of more fruits and veggies than I could possibly eat in one setting, which packs the biggest nutritional punch of the day.

My current favorite juice is a whole head of celery, 3 pink lady apples, a knob of ginger, and a head of romaine lettuce. It makes about a quart of juice. I often use the leftover pulp to make crackers to munch on. I choose the variety of juice I make based on what's in season, what's on sale, and/or what healing properties the foods can offer based on my current needs.

When I don't want juice, I'll eat a few bananas, make a smoothie, or a fruit bowl with various berries, bananas, etc. I also like to mix crunchy fruits with a bowl of sliced bananas to give a cereal-like texture when I'm eating it. Sometimes, I'll make banana "milk" in the blender to pour over it.

Lunch is usually a big salad or a wrap of some sort with raw foods. I use romaine lettuce leaves, cabbage leaves, collard leaves, swiss chard leaves, and big spinach leaves as my wraps instead of corn or grain tortillas, etc. I try not to eat anything cooked until my last meal of the day, and I include a salad with it, too, typically.

Snacks are more fruits and veggies or pulp crackers if I have any made. Sometimes, I'll do baked seasoned chickpeas, kale chips, etc.

Dinner is usually a soup, roasted, baked, sauteed, or steamed veggies of some sort. Crock pots and stick blenders are some of my favorite kitchen aids.

I try really hard not to eat anything after dinner and just sip on fruit juice, herbal tea, or water if I feel hungry. Nine times out of ten, it curbs the hunger.

It's been a huge struggle in many ways, but also has been the most rewarding one, yet. Food is a very sensitive area for most in which we've been deeply programmed to believe synthetically created stuff and other toxic stuff can actually nurture and sustain us. It may very well be keeping us alive, but at what cost, and is our current way of life one we can actually endure and support much longer? My body was no longer able to pay the price, that's for sure.

Edited to add: I found most of the kitchen tools I use via thrift shops and craigslist. I refuse to buy anything brand new, unless I absolutely have to. The stick blender was $2, the Jack LaLane power juicer was $3, the vitamix blender was $95 (found on craigslist....new ones are over $400, typically), spiralizer for making noodles out of veggies was on sale for $20, I think, mom gave me her old crock pot years ago, and the hubster gifted me a food processor years ago. I also look for the old school tools that don't require electricity when I'm out thrifting so I can hopefully still maintain the methods I've grown accustomed to if the power is down.

Fuzzy12
01-26-16, 10:51 AM
I'm sorry because my question is sort of off topic:

Unsy, (or anyone else), since I've started reading your posts on health, I've been wanting to buy a juicer so that I can incorporate all these healthy vegetables and fruits and whatever else that I struggle to regularly incorporate into my diet...you know, like Kale. Also, currently, I've got an aversion to most foods but I think, I'll be ok with juices.

Could you recommend a really, really simple juicer? Not the brand or anything but just the type? I mean, do I need a blender, juicer, mixer? Are there any particular accessories it needs to have? By simple I mean something that will make the process of juicing as easy and quick as possible with as little preparation or post processing as required (basically something where I can just dump washed fruits and uncooked vegetables in and it will give me nice and tasty juice). :o

Thanks and sorry acdc for the for the off topic-ness. :)

Little Missy
01-26-16, 10:53 AM
Every time I read Unsy's "a knob of ginger" I hear it in Julia Child's voice.

Unmanagable
01-26-16, 10:59 AM
I'm sorry because my question is sort of off topic:

Unsy, (or anyone else), since I've started reading your posts on health, I've been wanting to buy a juicer so that I can incorporate all these healthy vegetables and fruits and whatever else that I struggle to regularly incorporate into my diet...you know, like Kale. Also, currently, I've got an aversion to most foods but I think, I'll be ok with juices.

Could you recommend a really, really simple juicer? Not the brand or anything but just the type? I mean, do I need a blender, juicer, mixer? Are there any particular accessories it needs to have? By simple I mean something that will make the process of juicing as easy and quick as possible with as little preparation or post processing as required (basically something where I can just dump washed fruits and uncooked vegetables in and it will give me nice and tasty juice). :o

Thanks and sorry acdc for the for the off topic-ness. :)

I started with the nutri-bullet making smoothies. I didn't have the time or patience to deal with a juicer back then. I'd slice and freeze bananas ahead of time and toss in some greens and other frozen fruits, a little water or nut milk, and ta-da! They now offer a nutri-bullet rx version that is supposedly comparable to the vitamix for heating soups.

I wasn't planning to learn how to juice until my gall bladder attack encouraged me. lol Then I found that juicer for $3 at the thrift shop and located the user manual online. It's a pain in the *** to clean, I won't lie, but after using it a few times, it gets easier to deal with. I need to learn to make more than one serving at a time to lessen my frustrations with cleaning it.

Edited to add:

If you cut your food small enough and be sure to add liquid to help in the blending process, you can try it with any blender. I started with the nutri-bullet because it had more power to pulverize the food into a smoother consistency after trying the blender for a while. We found one on sale for $100 several years ago. It lasted a little over 3 years with almost daily use. Certain old school blenders are also compatible with small mouth mason jars. You can put your ingredients in there ahead of time and fix the smoothie in the same glass you drink it from. :)

sarahsweets
01-26-16, 02:18 PM
Totally serious question unmanagable- Is this way of eating affordable for a family? I live in a seasonal area and in the summer I buy local and grow my own. Off season I have to rely on the grocery store. I love eating healthy but sometimes things get so down to the wire I dont have much left over for the good stuff. Im not talking about crap like pop tarts soda and chips, but the basics. Is this doable on a very fixed yet constantly varying budget?

BTW Your posts on nutrition and diet used to drive me nuts. Then I thought about what you were saying and kept reading your posts. Now I love to read them! People say I can be too bull headed or head strong, or too opinionated but I like to believe that old dogs can learn new tricks.

Unmanagable
01-26-16, 02:48 PM
Other people speaking of health related things used to drive me nuts, too. Just as much as the ones speaking negatively about it all without ever trying it. lol We truly are still trainable. :) Albeit with little desire to partake, often. lol

It's hard trying to budget for it, especially when starting out, but I also barter with peeps who sell and grow food, so that helps tremendously.

The "ugly" table in the produce section is a huge help, too. Most peeps avoid it thinking stuff is already rotten, when it's actually just becoming ripe, in many cases.

My favorite cafe' even hooks me up with outdated stuff on occasion. Otherwise, they'd have to trash it. It's outdated to sell, but not outdated to eat.

Make friends with the produce managers. They like nice people with a sense of humor. lol They are prone to giving deals the regular store manager wouldn't. I got 40 lbs. of "overly" ripe bananas for $5 a while back. Great to freeze for smoothies.

Food preservation and not wasting a bit of it is helpful, too. I save veggie scraps and make my own veggie stock. Freeze a lot, dehydrate stuff, vacuum seal it, etc.

It all comes down to making the healthiest choices based on whatever you have to work with in the moment, and plan ahead as much as you can with prep work, checking sale papers, etc. Stressing over expectations we can't realistically meet in the moment is even worse on our bodies in the long run.

Each cold season reminds me to kick up my food growing and preservation game the next growing season. May I practice what I preach more often than not. :)

dvdnvwls
01-26-16, 03:36 PM
Regarding the essential questions in the OP - what changes to make, what to eat and what to avoid - well, besides the fact that there are so many beneficial ways to change what you eat and so many possible reasons why, it very much depends on what you're normally eating now, and on how much change you want to go through at once.

One thing that is almost certain to be good, and almost certain to work for anyone, is "Eat a lot more vegetables (not talking about fruits, just vegetables), and less of everything else." That doesn't require extra appliances, drinking your lunch, or anything like that. :)

Juicing can be good in the right context, but in general it is probably not as good (from the nutritional POV) as simply eating those things without juicing them.

stef
01-26-16, 03:59 PM
What is your diet like, now?
you'll really feel much better even eating much less 100 % processed foods
and seriously, fruit.

acdc01
01-26-16, 08:44 PM
What is your diet like, now?
you'll really feel much better even eating much less 100 % processed foods
and seriously, fruit.

I currently eat a high fiber cereal (or oatmeal) in the morning with almond milk, some fruit, and egg white. I drink water with a little orange juice in it for taste as I don't really like plain water. I had thought about going vegan (barring occasional seafood) and cutting out the egg white but I go hungry very quickly without the egg white.

Lunch, I usually buy out or eat left overs from dinner. If buy out, not healthy and with meat. I was trying to switch to canned soup and homemade sandwiches, with different type of soup and sandwich each day so it doesn't get boring. but I'm rethinking what I want to do here.

A week of dinners is usually four nights of frozen dinner I premade, then two nights of a seafood dinner (crab, fish, clams, etc), then I go out to eat on one night (sushi, thai burger, pretty much anything). Always with one vegetable side and some fruit. I tried to find healthy recipes for the frozen dinners but so far the ones I love are better than going out to eat every night but loaded with meats and pasta (slow cooker pot roast, chicken dumplings, linguini with clam sauce, etc.).

I have a bunch of snacks too - some healthy and some not. mango popsicles, cheesecake, chocolate, carrots, baby snap peas, fruit. I think I'm going to have to cut out the unhealthy ones though I currently eat those more than the healthy stuff.

I drink coke in the mornings to wake me up (don't like coffee). I don't drink enough water. I'm going to have to improve on that.

acdc01
01-26-16, 09:05 PM
how our innards are best fueled based on our actual physical needs and/or struggles, which can often be better determined via blood work, nutrient/vitamin levels testing, etc.
.

What do you mean by the above?

I think I can probably get a nutribullet and make juice. good idea. Maybe I'll borrow a blender from someone first so I can see if I like the taste of the vegetable juice before I fully commit.

I have a feeling it's not going to be as easy switching to this as the freezing dinners thing was but it does sound worth it.

How do you not be hungry? Just eating vegetables alone often leaves me hungry. Its always been egg whites, meats, or grains that have filled me up.

I guess I can switch to tea to wake me up in the mornings. I just can't stand the med side effects so I need something.

Also, I'm afraid not drinking and eating at the same time is time consuming. I have to work during the day. Maybe it isn't as complicated as it sounds though if I just carry a bottle of water. I'm not worried about the prep time it takes as bulk cooking seems to really shorten the workload. I only cook on one night a week now so I imagine even if I switch to this healthier eating, I can still do everything in one night.

I think I'll get the blender from my sister this weekend and start with trying some juices and carrying a water bottle with me at work. I'll try to cut down on the meat and processed food too as a start.


Thanks a lot for the input guys.

Unmanagable
01-26-16, 10:27 PM
I meant it's also a good idea to have your blood work done and nutrient levels tested by the doc as part of your regular blood testing/check-ups, especially if you're already dealing with symptoms of any other issues that could be directly affected by diet.

Learning where specific deficits are helps in knowing what to supplement with. I found D3, B complex, and zinc helpful for me. I also tracked my food intake and activity online using Cronometer for a period of time to help document my progress, or lack thereof. It helped give me an overview of daily nutrient intake, as well. I found it helpful for a while, but had to stop using it because I became way too anal about keeping up with stuff.

My body has adjusted to the new routine now, so I don't often get hungry between meals. It was quite an adjustment because of being used to eating eggs/toast/oatmeal/etc. each day for breakfast. My body remembered and felt like it was missing out. I have to keep healthy snacks prepped and on hand at all times to help me not choose things that I now know will bring me complications.

I had to spend a lot of time learning about mindful eating, too. I would even sometimes pretend I was actually eating what I was strongly craving by going through the chewing motions and visualizing it. It helped me more than I ever thought it could. The mind is such a powerful thing.

Getting plenty water and making sure I stay fully hydrated makes a huge difference, too. I drink a lot of freshly made juices and get a lot of water content from herbal teas and raw fruits and veggies, but still need several quarts of water a day. I feel it when I don't make it a point to stay on top of that.

I found it much easier to focus on what healthy things I could add vs. what all I'd be missing out on. Otherwise, I drove myself crazy with feeling a huge loss and got stuck in a negative mindset about food altogether.

Once I switched how I thought of it, I noticed some of the unhealthy stuff fading away without much effort and cravings switched to the healthier notions. I also had the good fortune of having folks pretty close by who have gone down similar paths and I could call on them for guidance and support. Without them, I likely would not have been as successful. Especially living with folks who still like all the things I no longer eat.

It's a continual daily effort and I still fail miserably, at times. Most recently, a jar of chunky store brand peanut butter and a stick of unsalted sweet cream store brand butter have been enticing me to no end. I wouldn't buy them if I were purchasing things only for myself, but the hubster still eats it. It's a daily fight against a heavy addiction that I never knew was such an issue in my life, until I made the drastic changes.

acdc01
01-26-16, 11:03 PM
I have a dr. appt. this week so will ask about the blood test. That's a good idea. I want to get a before and after test too and I'll probably either speak with a dietician or do some online/app thing at the beginning just to make sure my new diet gives me the nutrients I need.

I like your focus on healthy things you can add idea too. That probably would help motivate me.

I'm really impressed you and little missy have kept this up (even if with some occasional slips). Hope I can too.

Fuzzy, no worries about your question. I don't really think it's off topic and anything that adds to improving health and getting better sleep here is all good to me.

dvdnvwls
01-27-16, 02:22 AM
I'm really impressed you and little missy have kept this up (even if with some occasional slips). Hope I can too.
To make it easier and more successful, it might help to get the idea of "making a slip" out of there. Instead of "yourself, the cop" who is trying to make "yourself, the criminal" behave herself, there can be "just you, the person, who is eating better than before".

BellaVita
01-27-16, 03:05 AM
I find that non-processed healthy foods taste better than the processed junk anyway.

Also, I know this from experience, the longer you go without eating junk food the less and less you will crave it. Seriously. And this is coming from someone with a massive sweet tooth. (I do have to eat something sweet once in a while, but it's pretty rare nowadays that I go out and buy a candy bar)

In fact, I crave healthy stuff lots now.

A good juicy orange tastes better than most candy for example.

Unmanagable
01-29-16, 02:31 PM
Just dropping by to give a couple examples of how sensitive my body is towards overly processed foods now, and I also feel it serves to show how much easier it is to tell what's going on with our bodies when we're able to narrow stuff down to this extent.

Rice. Loved it. Ate it damn near daily at times. Always believed it was healthy. Once I stopped it and tried to reintroduce it, it was like the 4th of July fireworks scene in my gut.

Gluten. Makes me feel as if I'm living my days barely making it through quicksand with a constant fibro and arthritis flare up.

My first super scary incident was after eating utz brand corn tortilla chips one night when having really strong cravings, I ate damn near a half of bag, late night, which I had stopped doing months prior. (but would do often and not think twice about it previously) I got extremely dizzy and fainted for a brief moment. I was fine after that, but damn.

The last few days, I've been dealing with headaches and assumed I may simply be catching a cold and it could be sinus related, or it's just remnants from stress from having homework, etc., only to remember that I've also been randomly dipping into two other things I haven't eaten since April of 2015......store brand peanut butter (i make my own or buy/barter with others who do) and store brand unsalted butter (had given it up completely, but was craving it like crazy on a potato). I stopped dipping, head stopped hurting.

The dots that can be connected are many, and they stretch so far and wide in many different directions. The process of elimination has become much easier now that I've eliminated whole food groups and such.

What a journey. Sincerely hoping others can find even the slightest relief in some form by healthily learning more about what their bodies jive the best with. It's a jungle out there.