View Full Version : Demand avoidance? Paralysis of will?


Cyllya
01-28-16, 03:03 AM
Ahoy. Just looking for other folks with this problem in hopes of swapping some coping techniques, or clarifying the nature of this problem, or maybe just commiserating.

I have a problem that I've been calling "pathological avoidance of demands" for lack of a better term. (In the UK, "pathological demand avoidance" is the name of a diagnosis related to the autism spectrum, and it centers around this problem, but the diagnostic criteria has some extra stuff.)

Basically, I feel sad, stressed, anxious, and/or frustrated when faced with almost any kind of task or obligation. Actually, I think I start off apathetic and lazy (or something), but the looming consequences of not doing the task makes my emotional state get worse. (If it's something that doesn't have bad consequences of not doing, I can just not do it.)

Obviously, everyone is reluctant to do things they don't want to do; that's the whole idea behind reluctance. So at first I thought I was just being wimpy, but then, I started to realize that my emotions in these situations are completely inappropriate for the actual level of unpleasantness. It's just harder than it should be to DO STUFF.

Several folks (mostly autistic) on wrongplanet.net told me they have this problem, and the ASD/aspie community has the term autistic inertia (https://unstrangemind.wordpress.com/2013/01/02/autistic-inertia-an-overview/). Although, I feel like that focuses more on trouble with transitions between activities. Transitions are likely to be involved in my problem, but I feel like my problem is something else.

"Pathological Demand Avoidance (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pathological_demand_avoidance)" is apparently some obscure diagnostic label in the UK, related to the autism spectrum. When I first heard of it, I felt like just the name of the condition fit me perfectly, although the actual condition itself (or at least the diagnostic criteria) doesn't apply to me.

ADHD folks are often reluctant to do tasks that require a lot of cognitive effort or concentration, but I figure that's because ADHD makes congnitive effort and concentration hard. I have this problem with tasks that are still fairly easy in spite of all my other impairments.

I have depression, but it's cyclical and pretty well-controlled by medication, and this problem occurs even outside of depressive episodes.

The gal from Hyperbole and a Half (http://hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.com/) seems to have this problem, because her book has a chapter called "Motivation" which starts with this:

One of the most terrifying things that has ever happened to me was watching myself decide over and over again--thirty-five days in a row--to not return a movie I had rented. Everyday, I saw it sitting there on the arm of my couch. And everyday, I thought, I should really do something about that... and then I just didn't.

After a week, I started to worry it was never going to happen, but I thought, Surely I have more control over my life than this. Surely I wouldn't allow myself to NEVER return the movie.

Then the cartoon picture of herself, standing next to the movie and couch, looking glum, thinking, "...I wouldn't just... NOT do something this easy, right?"

Then there's a few pages of cartoons of her arguing with herself about putting away a plate she had food on three days ago.

The situation that made me realize the nature of this problem (as much as I have) was when I had to force myself to give medicine to my sick pets. Why did I have to force myself? It should have been easy. Sometimes it's hard to give medicine to pets, but not in this case. I was only able to force myself because my pets' lives were at stake.

I'm never even sure what to call this. Do I just go to a psychologist and be like, "I'M LAZY AND I DON'T KNOW WHY PLEASE HELP :( :( :(" ? :confused:

Hathor
01-28-16, 04:24 AM
HI, they say I am too socially aware for autism, but I think that is some crappy dogma on their part and they should let me claim ADHD/ASD to make me feel better with an esoteric label.

To me the only diff is that I know I made a fool of myself in the eyes of the plebs, while autistics are spared the shame. Not sure why I should care what plebs think of me, but I can't seem to shake THAT care.

But since they only make it harder to get the esoteric label after ending aspie for the DSMV, I guess I am stuck with the lucky beer label.

What did you call it? [ah yes internia], I feel like a freight train, but it can be real tough to get a train moving. I have this recurring dream where I go back to School, and every thing is ducky till I don't do my ephin homework, as my dad used to put it.

Then the nightmare begins. It really does feel like a self-fulfilling prophecy does it not? Even things I usually like to do, if I HAVE to do them, that changes everything and I end up putting it on the back burner to cook up some crap for me top get in.

Hey OP, sorry but I am going to switch into a duality here for the h8ers

Hi you 39ers, thanks for tripping me in fall 2014 as a bunch of twisted bullies. Who knows where THAT train would have led if you would have left me alone? Trust me, I derail the train enough on my own, so take a hike off a cliff and mind your own problems for a change, bunch of rodents..

Ok sorry op, this whole thing is basically a rant, but perhaps you find solstice in it.

thelostone
01-28-16, 11:53 AM
ADHD folks are often reluctant to do tasks that require a lot of cognitive effort or concentration, but I figure that's because ADHD makes congnitive effort and concentration hard. I have this problem with tasks that are still fairly easy in spite of all my other impairments.

This is a common misunderstanding. ADHD-I does not make concentration hard, in fact it's quite the opposite - when left unchecked you do nothing but concentrate. The problem is that you cannot choose what you concentrate on. You can be in the middle of a conversation and if it's not something your mind is enjoying/wanting to concentrate on it'll start scanning around looking for other opportunities for greater stimuli.

Cognitive effort is also something that ADHDers enjoy, so long as it is in their wheelhouse. For me, matrix reasoning is top of the charts so I can spend days doing things like sudokus, computer coding, and so on as if I was on holiday but ask me to do a book report and watch me implode.

As to pathological avoidance, I'm not sure if it's avoidance or inability to control one's ability to act. I've sat there screaming at myself out loud to do something important - completely paralyzed, wanting to do the thing (which suggests I'm not actually avoiding), but unable to cause action.

sarahsweets
01-29-16, 04:09 AM
Basically, I feel sad, stressed, anxious, and/or frustrated when faced with almost any kind of task or obligation. Actually, I think I start off apathetic and lazy (or something), but the looming consequences of not doing the task makes my emotional state get worse. (If it's something that doesn't have bad consequences of not doing, I can just not do it.)
Even if there is bad consequences, I still have issues!

Obviously, everyone is reluctant to do things they don't want to do; that's the whole idea behind reluctance. So at first I thought I was just being wimpy, but then, I started to realize that my emotions in these situations are completely inappropriate for the actual level of unpleasantness. It's just harder than it should be to DO STUFF.

I wouldnt say your emotions are inappropriate. They are how you struggle so for now they are appropriate and you are looking for a solution.

ADHD folks are often reluctant to do tasks that require a lot of cognitive effort or concentration, but I figure that's because ADHD makes congnitive effort and concentration hard. I have this problem with tasks that are still fairly easy in spite of all my other impairments.

ADHD is a doing disorder. We know what to DO, we just have trouble DOING what we know.

Gemini Six
03-08-16, 04:47 AM
Yes! A thousand times, yes! Following the links to the discussion on autism was eye-opening. I have always dealt with "Task inertia", and even named as such without being aware of it. I've always had a very difficult time starting things that need to be done, or stopping something I'm involved in.

Also yes to the "looping" songs, scenes from movies, interesting words, etc.

So I guess I'm "on the spectrum".

willow129
03-08-16, 09:56 PM
Yupyupyup!!! It's sooo frustrating! I struggle less with it on meds but it's still a problem, definitely. And it's the reason I haven't got my lesson planning done...AGAIN, this week.
every week - why do I do this to myself!!! Again? Really? REALLY??

Anyways. Yes

My mom is the same. That was not a good thing for her children. Sigh. I wish we knew more about this stuff.

(Sometimes exercising can help me get more "inertia")

I'm not on the spectrum though (that I'm aware?!)...I've sort of told myself that it's because of what Sarahsweets said - ADHD is a "doing" disorder.

jeepster
03-11-16, 08:12 PM
Yes, me too and it soooooo sucks! I have the desire to do so much, not to mention the important stuff like paying bills. I have gotten even worse in the past year or so. So it snowballs into depression. I just started Focalin, from dex. I don't feel any improvement so far.

Cyllya
03-16-16, 02:54 AM
Oho, apparently "initiation of actions" is a a recognized aspect of executive function. (I've read about executive function a lot before, I don't usually see "initiation" being listed as one of the elements. It doesn't help that EF is sometimes called "the CEO of the brain," but this problem feels like it relates more to the middle management of the brain!) This website about Asperger's syndrome (http://musingsofanaspie.com/2014/01/15/executive-function-primer-part-3/) tipped me off to this and gives a small amount of coping advice.

I think I might have managed to scrape up one meager coping mechanism for myself, kind of. It seems this problem effects me a lot less in the small amount of time after I get home from work. Unfortunately, I tend to feel kind of crappy and overstimulated at this time of day, and it's also when my roommate is most inclined to talk at me (speech tends to really drain my "brain energy," I have trouble doing anything while someone is talking). I'm going to try making a todo list of quick brainless tasks like putting away the dishes, taking out the trash, etc, during some time of day when I can think clearly, talk to my roommate about leaving me alone, and then do the tasks on the list after I get home the next day. There's a lot of stuff that can't be addressed with this plan, but I think it might help take care of some stupid housework stuff.

Here's why I think I have less problems after getting home from work, in case it helps someone else find a time that works for them: It's a time of transition, but it's not a transition to any particular activity. I have to stop what I'm doing regardless, but I usually don't have a requirement to start anything in particular. (Whereas, it would be a disaster if I tried to squeeze any chores into the last 15 minutes before going to work.) It's a routine situation, so I'm not spending cognitive effort figuring out how to handle the transition.

If I hated my job and was always totally exhausted when I came home, it probably wouldn't work.

I'm not on the spectrum though (that I'm aware?!)...I've sort of told myself that it's because of what Sarahsweets said - ADHD is a "doing" disorder.
So I guess I'm "on the spectrum".
It seems there's a lot of overlap in ADHD and autism, even though you wouldn't guess just by looking at the diagnostic criteria.

This is a common misunderstanding. ADHD-I does not make concentration hard, in fact it's quite the opposite - when left unchecked you do nothing but concentrate. The problem is that you cannot choose what you concentrate on. You can be in the middle of a conversation and if it's not something your mind is enjoying/wanting to concentrate on it'll start scanning around looking for other opportunities for greater stimuli.

Cognitive effort is also something that ADHDers enjoy, so long as it is in their wheelhouse. For me, matrix reasoning is top of the charts so I can spend days doing things like sudokus, computer coding, and so on as if I was on holiday but ask me to do a book report and watch me implode.
ADHD is a doing disorder. We know what to DO, we just have trouble DOING what we know.
Ehh, while I agree that ADHD could be considered a "doing disorder," concentration is still a common difficulty for us. I know I have a lot of "brain fog" (even on stuff I'm interested in), and the diagnostic criteria focuses more on in-the-moment distractibility and forgetfulness than it does on motivation. (DSM5 symptom "often avoids or is reluctant to engage in tasks that require sustained mental effort" is particularly what I was referring to.) Heck, thelostone, right after you said it doesn't make concentration hard, you followed it up with not one but two examples of how we typically fail at concentrating. What would difficulty concentrating entail if not that sort of thing?

Plus, ADHD is still the official diagnosis people will usually get if they have SCT aka Concentration Deficit Disorder.

Fortune
03-16-16, 06:32 AM
HI, they say I am too socially aware for autism, but I think that is some crappy dogma on their part and they should let me claim ADHD/ASD to make me feel better with an esoteric label.

To me the only diff is that I know I made a fool of myself in the eyes of the plebs, while autistics are spared the shame. Not sure why I should care what plebs think of me, but I can't seem to shake THAT care.

But since they only make it harder to get the esoteric label after ending aspie for the DSMV, I guess I am stuck with the lucky beer label.

Believe me, it is not impossible for autistic people to realize that others view them in such ways.

It's not particularly harder to get the label after Asperger Syndrome was removed from the DSM-5. It should be about as difficult or easy as it was during the DSM-IV.

This is a common misunderstanding. ADHD-I does not make concentration hard, in fact it's quite the opposite - when left unchecked you do nothing but concentrate. The problem is that you cannot choose what you concentrate on. You can be in the middle of a conversation and if it's not something your mind is enjoying/wanting to concentrate on it'll start scanning around looking for other opportunities for greater stimuli.

Cognitive effort is also something that ADHDers enjoy, so long as it is in their wheelhouse. For me, matrix reasoning is top of the charts so I can spend days doing things like sudokus, computer coding, and so on as if I was on holiday but ask me to do a book report and watch me implode.

As to pathological avoidance, I'm not sure if it's avoidance or inability to control one's ability to act. I've sat there screaming at myself out loud to do something important - completely paralyzed, wanting to do the thing (which suggests I'm not actually avoiding), but unable to cause action.

I would hesitate to make sweeping claims that ADHD is or is not like this. It's possible to find concentration easy when doing some things and difficult when doing other things and that is still pretty much ADHD. As was posted in the thread, initiation of actions is an executive function, which is impaired across the board with ADHD.

Roundmouth
04-16-16, 10:04 AM
Great thread. So relieved to read this.

dvdnvwls
04-16-16, 08:20 PM
I didn't read every post carefully, but this sounds an awful lot like me.

Roundmouth
04-16-16, 09:39 PM
I didn't read every post carefully, but this sounds an awful lot like me.

Sounds just like the very nuclear of what we live with, that thing that normal people can't seem to even imagine.

Roundmouth
05-21-16, 03:25 PM
Pathological Demand Avoidance (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pathological_demand_avoidance)" is apparently some obscure diagnostic label in the UK, related to the autism spectrum. When I first heard of it, I felt like just the name of the condition fit me perfectly, although the actual condition itself (or at least the diagnostic criteria) doesn't apply to me.

Now this is almost a bit scary. I smurfed around a bit and read here and there - and this really is so completely me. Never before have I managed to identify with a syndrome - or a proposed syndrome - to this degree.

What really caught my attention was all these things with social skills that's so different from other types of autism. Interest in role playing and fantasy games, imitating other people's behavior in a creative way - ie not only copying - and no appearant signs of social anxiety such as poor eye contact or avoiding being in the middle - yet so totally insensitive to more subtle signals. I've often described myself like that. I may even to some appear extraverted.

In fact this could actually explain my whole set of difficulties and odd behaviors. All these traits that motivated my ADHD diagnose could actually be explained with this proposed syndrome. I've also actually noticed some traits in myself that remind of borderline personality disorder. These traits really make no sense and they don't seem to fit in with anything else. Manipulative behaviors - though always connected to demands of others - and some kind of social obsessiveness.

willow129
05-22-16, 09:04 AM
I'm noticing more and more this demand avoidance thing...especially having broken up with my boyfriend, and reflecting on that relationship... this was a HUGE problem in our relationship and while I really want to date again and have a significant other, I'm terrified of going through these problems again. I'm trying to talk to my therapist about it too...such stupid little things when my boyfriend would ask for help I would just turn into a complete mess. I felt like a brat and a bad person. In some ways I'm really having to put my self esteem back together again, I was so convinced I was a bad person, because of how cranky I would be when asked to do things.

Now that I'm living alone things have to happen somehow (ex used to ask me what would I *do* if he wasn't around) things are not as together and organized without him but I do get around to some of the stuff I used to make a huge stink about because there is more pressure without help, sort of same feeling as a deadline looming type of thing. But it's still super hard.

I find one of the things I really have trouble with is things I've never done before, or things I feel potentially confused about...like having to get something fixed, taxes, umm...things like that. I do procrastinate on stupid little things that really aren't hard, I did that more when I was in a relationship, but now the things that are sort of potentially new or confusing activities are the worst.

I really hope there are ways to cope with this, especially in the context of a relationship....

It does feel very emotional too, like you said, the emotional reaction I have to not wanting to get up and do something is really disproportionate to what the activity actually demands of me. And that really doesn't help obviously. So I am trying to break down where the emotional reaction is coming into play, what about the activity is making me feel emotional, I haven't really made a lot of progress on this yet, except for realizing that the activities that involve a certain amount of having to figure it out do freak me out. But hopefully having some awareness of where the emotion comes in can help me, at the very least, recognize when it's happening and be more aware so I won't be so likely to blow up at a loved one. I don't know if it will make it easier to initiate but it would be nice to not feel like a wretched person to be around.

The other thing is I do make lists and try to think of times in the day where I seem to be able to get more done, like you.
Lately I've been mixing up activities like, I'll do 25 minutes of the really painful activity, and then I'll do 25 minutes of playing an instrument and then 25 minutes of brainless chores which I'm actually starting to enjoy a little bit, and then back to the painful activity. I set timers for this. It's not really efficient but it's better than nothing. But I feel like this approach, in the context of a relationship - might be a little hard on a significant other, always going between things and leaving stuff not quite finished or whatever. I feel like I'd need someone reeeeallyy flexible to be able to deal with that. I dunno, maybe I'm worrying too much about it but, it's just that when the demand avoidance only affects me...it only affects me! But it's horrible when it's impacting someone else too....and it really made me so stressed and did a number on my self esteem....

Roundmouth
05-22-16, 04:14 PM
Do you have any idea where this behavior might come from? It really appears to be a very central executive functioning issue, typical ADHD thing. Most people on this spectrum seems to have it, more or less.

However - I've noticed that stimulant medication makes very little difference. Also, most people in this group actually seem to have somewhat less problem with this. That makes me wonder if part of the problem may have some other cause.

There is this theory of PDA being a stereotypical female expression of autism spectrum. It often comes with many other traits without appearant connection to avoidance and procrastination. But Newson's theories around this make sense. Compensation for communicative impairment by extreme focus and awareness on social behaviors and roles. Avoidance as a monomanic behavior, a sense of passive control caused by anxiety of failing.

Cyllya
05-24-16, 11:38 PM
I feel like stimulants have the potential to help this problem.

I've been having a problem with demand avoidance at work the last couple months, even though I didn't in the past. I'm kind of coasting on my past good performance at this point; if things don't improve soon, the folks in charge will realize how unproductive I am, and I will be both humiliated and fired. :(

But last Monday, I went up to a higher dosage of Adderall for the first time.

I wish I'd kept better notes, but I think the week went something like this:
Monday = The problem was completely gone during my workday. I was able to work all day without a problem.
Tuesday = The problem came back about halfway, but I was still able to be fairly productive.
Wednesday = Better than Tuesday, not as good as Monday.
Thursday = Almost as bad as previous weeks.
Friday = As bad as a particularly bad day during previous weeks. I got almost nothing done. (Possibly relevant: I was sick to my stomach and vomited about 45 minutes after taking the med. I wasn't sick the whole day.)
Saturday (not at work) = So hard to do anything, very demoralizing.... In the afternoon, I had a coffee (Frappuccino) and felt a little better.
Sunday (not at work) = Decided to skip a dose this day. Didn't try very hard to do anything, but things didn't seem as bad as the day before. No noticeable withdrawal effects.
Monday (yesterday) = I was sleep very deprived, but I was only a little unproductive.
Today = Meh. Not great. Could have been worse.


I'm not sure if this decline is from rapidly gaining tolerance or what. It didn't seem to correlate with how much sleep I got, what I ate for breakfast, or how much caffeine I had. I'm supposed to take an iron supplement, but I keep forgetting. I know I took it both Monday and Friday, but I'm not sure about the other days. I also took 750 mg of calcium carbonate on on the first Monday, yesterday, and today. (I've had problems with Adderall causing me heartburn in the past, so at first this was to preempt any problems caused by the increased dose, but since it seemed to help that first day, I figured I'd experiment with it further.) Apparently Adderall is very fickle for how it is effected by food, but I'm having trouble finding any good info on this, except that everyone agrees citric acid is bad.

OH, while I was partway through writing this post, I went to get a snack and decided to check the ingredients label on various beverages I've got. One had phosphoric acid, one had malic acid, and the one I was drinking Saturday had citric acid. These are all different kinds of sodas. I'm not sure I can handle not drinking soda at all, but maybe if I avoid the ones with citric acid, it'll get a little better...?

Now that I'm living alone things have to happen somehow (ex used to ask me what would I *do* if he wasn't around) things are not as together and organized without him but I do get around to some of the stuff I used to make a huge stink about because there is more pressure without help, sort of same feeling as a deadline looming type of thing. But it's still super hard.
I hear you. I crashed and burned pretty badly when I lived alone (which was also after I broke up with my ex and he moved out). The fact that I had low wages, no feeling of job security, and an untreated depressive disorder didn't help, but even without those, I would have been a mess. I re-started depression treatment, and the depression went away, but the demand avoidance did not.

I remember feeling like my ability to get stuff done was "broken" by the couple months of being in a depressive daze, but in retrospect I know I've had this problem since before that. I think the depression broke some of my routines, so that made it harder to do things.

If I can't get rid of or effectively mitigate this problem, I think I'm going to have to accept that I can't actually live independently. If I made enough money, I could probably hire people to help, but it will still require some sacrifices, e.g. I can't have kids or pets.

Cyllya
06-14-16, 01:28 AM
On my higher Adderall dose, I've noticed that I have much less of an urge to not do things, and much less of an urge to stop doing things.

However, it seems to magnify my urge to continue doing things. I think I naturally have a tendency to "get stuck" on activities, but now it's worse! I've been leaving work an hour or so late every night just because I have a weird urge to keep working. (That's definitely better than the alternative, but I'm not getting paid more.) My job isn't really that fun.:scratch:

So getting started on an activity may still be hard, just because I have trouble quitting the previous activity.

While I was reading a study about meds for a different reason, I came across this article (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3489818/), and I think it's talking about this phenomenon when it says this:
Stimulant drugs do improve the ability (even without ADHD) to focus and pay attention. One function, which is reliably improved by stimulant medications, is sustained attention, or vigilance. Stimulants improve sustained, focused attention, but “selective attention” and “distractibility” may be worsened, possibly because of a drug induced increase in impulsivity. Both AMP and MPH do not improve (and may even impair) short-term acquisition of information. In addition, AMP and MPH do not improve, and may impair “cognitive flexibility” as assessed with tests such as the Wisconsin Card Sort and Attentional Set-Shifting tasks.
(AMP=amphetamine, MPH=methylphenidate)
(bolding mine)

Roundmouth
06-24-16, 10:13 PM
I experienced that on Concerta I think, but at least not yet on Vyvanse. The Concerta forced my mind, Vyvanse only allows me.

But it seems like I'll be needing extreme doses. On some 50 - 90 mg:s I experience some therapeuthical effect but not bellow that dose. However, the effect lasts only for some three hours. I'd need that dose three times a day to have practical use of the effect. That gives... something between 150 and 270... That's a lot of milligrams.

Then I suspect that the drug may perhaps make other things worse, so I guess I'll have to find some dose in between - acompromise. Maybe combinations of different substances are ideal? I'm very curious about guanfacine. Alone or along with amphetamine. Sometimes - far from always - when I've had amphetamine in the system along with methylphenidate, I've noticed some interaction that I haven't experienced with any of the two alone. But I haven't tried enough to have a good idea about it.

Mind_paralyzis
06-26-16, 01:20 PM
Right, I'm experiencing the symptoms of Pathological Rumination right now, so I CAN'T be made to dig up all of the quotes and studies by Dr. Russell Barkley, but suffice to say...

It's got NOTHING to do with Autism - the people with autism are experiencing a different, but similar deficit in attention.

Pathological Rumination is what Dr. Barkley calls it - the inability to to execute attention in the first place - we overthink everything, to the point of complete mental and physical fatigue.

Basically, our minds are stuck at PREPARING to go, but never getting to GO,GO,GO,GO,GOOOO!!! Which the hyperactives, the people with REAL ADHD have.

There are 5-6 aspects of attention, according to the cognitive model currently used by science - and SCT seems to correlate with deficits in one of them, ADHD seems to correlate with deficits in another.

That actually means there are 4 more aspects to disturb... I'm guessing that what some of these autists are experiencing, is indeed a disturbance in a completely different aspect.

Hold on... I'm getting a second wind from writing this... it's hard...!

Ah - here we go.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attention#Clinical_model



Focused attention: The ability to respond discretely to specific visual, auditory (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auditory_spatial_attention) or tactile stimuli.
(Deficits in this one correlates to ADHD)
Sustained attention (vigilance (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vigilance_Theory) and concentration (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attentional_control)): The ability to maintain a consistent behavioral response during continuous and repetitive activity.
(Deficits in this one correlates to SCT)
Selective attention: The ability to maintain a behavioral or cognitive set in the face of distracting or competing stimuli. Therefore, it incorporates the notion of "freedom from distractibility."
Alternating attention: The ability of mental flexibility that allows individuals to shift their focus of attention and move between tasks having different cognitive requirements.
(THIS seems to be the autistic problem. It's a completely different thing, ya'll! Btw, if this is correct... that these are all independent attention-disorders... then maybe the autists on anotherdrum have some HOPE! :) Because, this implies it's something similar to ADHD and SCT - and NOT autism! Well, that, or they have a comorbid attention-disorder, which is certainly common, lot's of ADHD-ers who have Autism as well. Guess it makes sense.)
Divided attention: This is the highest level of attention and it refers to the ability to respond simultaneously to multiple tasks or multiple task demands.

Little Voice
08-29-16, 05:30 PM
Thank you for this thread....I am crying now. But 'Good' crying. This is actually a treatable disorder?....oh dear, the years I have wasted is heartbreaking.