View Full Version : Ugh..seriously?


BellaVita
02-03-16, 12:38 AM
So I was browsing the web, and I found something that said they are an "Asperger's trainer."

That got me curious, so I clicked.

Apparently, they train people who are autistic to appear "normal."

And they said can train them to act like "a normal human being."

Wtf?

And that he has trained someone with Asperger's in the past and did so well that that person now has "normal friends."

Oh, he also mentioned that women don't generally get Asperger's so it will be "your son" who he would train.

And they said that once their job is finished, that the son will be near normal and you won't even be able to tell they had Asperger's.


This type of stuff ****** me off.

Cyllya
02-03-16, 04:29 PM
Unfortunately, most autism treatment is like that. They wouldn't call it an "asperger trainer," they'd call it "autism therapy" or "applied behavioral analysis."

daveddd
02-03-16, 04:54 PM
you didn't link it, but your cliff notes gives me a feeling that the place isn't doing this for the right reasons

I've read conflicting reports on autism, some say people with autism don't want much human contact, some say others do but don't know how because of lack of social skills

i can relate to the second my social anxiety makes social situations so unbearable i go through times of being a hermit

if its the second applies does social skills training for autism fall under the things you hate?

i would change my social anxiety if i could

but with the wording you provided , i very much understand and feel your disgust by this particular "won't even know your kid is autistic approach", it's very invalidating

I'm sorry,

I'm just trying to understand your feelings better

stef
02-03-16, 05:16 PM
If thats the language used, how awful!
Imagine if the writer had said "I can coach kids with mild autism and help them develop social skills and make friends". That would be totally acceptable.

this is more like, I'll coach your son so you dont have to feel bad about your childs disability". ugh.

BellaVita
02-03-16, 07:31 PM
Yeah, it was partially the language used that really annoyed me.

I used some of their exact wording in my OP. I didn't link because the website breaks some ADDF guidelines.

I myself spent hours and hours researching body language/reading numerous body language books/observing people and mimicking them as a kid-teenager.

I had no clue why I was doing this. I just knew I sucked at this stuff.

It has semi-helped me, but I'm still pretty bad at it.

BellaVita
02-03-16, 07:41 PM
you didn't link it, but your cliff notes gives me a feeling that the place isn't doing this for the right reasons

I've read conflicting reports on autism, some say people with autism don't want much human contact, some say others do but don't know how because of lack of social skills

i can relate to the second my social anxiety makes social situations so unbearable i go through times of being a hermit

if its the second applies does social skills training for autism fall under the things you hate?

i would change my social anxiety if i could

but with the wording you provided , i very much understand and feel your disgust by this particular "won't even know your kid is autistic approach", it's very invalidating

I'm sorry,

I'm just trying to understand your feelings better

I guess maybe it depends on each autistic person.

I personally do like human contact, but only with people I'm close with. Or on here, I consider it to be my main way of socializing.

Interacting with others in person (other than my fiancÚ, he just rolls with however I act, although I still get drained sometimes around him) drains me because it's a constant thing in my conscious mind of "okay, stand this far away, oh wait maybe that is too far, look them in the eye, what does that facial expression mean?,what am I supposed to respond to that?, wait, they stopped talking, do I walk away?" and so on.

So yeah it's quite exhausting.

I'm not sure I'm against all social skills training, what I am against though is ABA therapy. They try to "train the autism" out of the kids. So then the kids can't use their own natural ways of communicating, and are silenced. I consider it a form of abuse.

But, I will probably teach my kids some social skills, especially if they want to know them. I think the biggest thing for me is to not try to train the kid to "stop acting autistic" - not scold them for hand flapping/rocking/spinning etc.

I once read a story about this teacher who came up to a parent after school saying how the child needed therapy because they flap their hands in class, the mom defended the kid and said it was just fine to flap.

I thought that was pretty cool.

I mean, I did get made fun of for rocking as a child, but if I had known I was autistic I think that would have helped. It was out of my control, it wouldn't have been able to get "trained out of me" anyway.

Thanks for trying to understand my feelings. :grouphug: