View Full Version : Son needs to go off meds for the Military, stop now?


LilysGrama
02-11-16, 05:41 PM
Hi all..... My son is 17 and in the 11th grade. He takes Vyvanse. He has ADHD and learning disabilities.

He has plans of going into the Military and has to be off meds for one year before he can enlist. We were planning on him staying on his meds through his Senior year and then stopping after that. He has been on meds 365 days a year since he was 6, and has done well!

So, there was a problem with our mail order pharmacy (UGH) and he has been without meds for about 5 days. I was so nervous, but he is doing GREAT! He said he is feeling fine at school and work, just a bit more fidgety.

So, we are wondering if he should just stay off them now. I am a bit hesitant, of course. Any insight is appreciated! Thanks

dvdnvwls
02-11-16, 09:17 PM
If he knows for sure that he needs to be off meds for the military, and if he's very sure he's going to enlist, and if it's getting somewhat close to that one-year mark anyway (I mean, that one-year-ahead point may be within a few months), and he says he's doing fine, then the only reason I can see for him to start meds again is if he thinks it would be better. I think when it's a few months and he's 17 then it's fine to let him decide.

LilysGrama
02-11-16, 10:48 PM
Thank you!

Caco3girl
02-12-16, 09:09 AM
Wow, my son has plans to go into the military and it never occurred to me that his ADHD meds might be a problem. Thank you for the post.

Unmanagable
02-12-16, 11:02 AM
I find it disturbingly odd that the services wouldn't want people to be on top of their game and at their greatest functioning capacity while they are serving, instead of totally flipping the script while adding a ton of other stressors at a rapid rate.

Hoping the after care they receive upon returning home improves greatly as time goes by. Makes a little more sense why things unfold as they do. I can't imagine having to be in that position from any angle. Much respect.

Pilgrim
02-12-16, 12:00 PM
Excuse when you're in the middle of the bush you just can't pop down to he pharmacy. That's how it was explained to me anyway.

LilysGrama
02-12-16, 01:11 PM
I was really upset when I found out about the ADD meds, but then I found out that anyone that needs any kind of meds is disqualified......asthma, diabetes, etc etc

Caco3girl
02-12-16, 03:57 PM
Excuse when you're in the middle of the bush you just can't pop down to he pharmacy. That's how it was explained to me anyway.

I don't disagree with the stance. They want soldiers to train without the aid of medicine that may not be available to them.

I do disagree with the year wait period. The ADHD meds should be out in less than two days! Making them wait a year seems harsh, especially for kids who want to enlist straight out of high school.

LilysGrama
02-12-16, 04:23 PM
I don't disagree with the stance. They want soldiers to train without the aid of medicine that may not be available to them.

I do disagree with the year wait period. The ADHD meds should be out in less than two days! Making them wait a year seems harsh, especially for kids who want to enlist straight out of high school.

They want to see how the kids function in school (community college) and work, without meds (I can't say I blame them, even though it is frustrating).

dvdnvwls
02-12-16, 04:32 PM
I am the furthest thing from a soldier you could ever imagine... but it seems to me that the military rejecting anyone who depends on medication makes perfect sense. They have to choose the people who they think are right for the job, just like any organization would. And for the military, a big part of that is that the person will succeed at crucial tasks without support.

Fuzzy12
02-12-16, 06:26 PM
I think maybe the one year waiting period isn't so bad. The meds are out in two days but (for me at least) the withdrawal lasted longer. Moore importantly though in that one year you might realise that you absolutely can't function without meds and then it's probably not the best idea to join the military. I think it's better than jumping in at the deep end without your meds suddenly.

LilysGrama
02-12-16, 09:48 PM
I think maybe the one year waiting period isn't so bad. The meds are out in two days but (for me at least) the withdrawal lasted longer. Moore importantly though in that one year you might realise that you absolutely can't function without meds and then it's probably not the best idea to join the military. I think it's better than jumping in at the deep end without your meds suddenly.

Good point!

What did the withdrawal feel like for you?

Fuzzy12
02-16-16, 11:21 AM
Good point!

What did the withdrawal feel like for you?

It felt as if my brain stopped worked. I couldn't focus on anything not even fun stuff that I'd normally enjoy. I was super tired and restless and getting more and more depressed. I wouldn't be able to say though how much of it was withdrawal symptoms and how much was just a return of my symptoms. However, now, almost 3 months after quitting meds my symptoms are better again, which is why I suspect it was partly at least withdrawal.

What really helped me the first time when I quit was to do lots and lots of sports.