View Full Version : Progress with chore time!


Gryphonfyre
02-15-16, 01:22 AM
I just wanted to share that we've been making some wonderful strides with chore time.

We're doing a reward system where I have my son do one chore at a time. While he's doing the chore, I hide a ticket (I just went into word and created some ticket-looking things that say "Tickets for ...", printed them on card stock and cut them out.) When he's done with his chore, he gets to find it. Each ticket is worth time on electronics, or he can choose something out of a card box of things that I've made up (I got some index cards and wrote on them things like frozen yogurt, in-app purchases, picking a movie.) He says, "It's like Easter or a scavenger hunt every day!" So far so good.

Caco3girl
02-15-16, 04:02 PM
Congrats! Always good to hear about something that worked.

Gryphonfyre
02-15-16, 10:33 PM
Thanks! ;)

dvdnvwls
02-15-16, 10:39 PM
I really admire your perseverance, and I appreciate your willingness to try some things based on advice from a bunch of strangers on the internet. Being a parent to a child who has ADHD must be weird. It certainly was weird for me, being a child with ADHD - though I didn't know I had ADHD, and just kept wondering what was wrong with me.

One chore at a time is certainly an important building block of a good plan. Giving two or three chores at a time would waste far more time and energy (from forgetting what the first one even was after hearing the second one, for example, or from feeling overwhelmed).

It may seem ridiculous to imagine two chores being overwhelming, but it's not the actual chores that are the problem; it's the inability to keep two new things in mind.

Old familiar chores are easier in this regard than new ones. If there are instructions to keep track of - and by "instructions" I mean "anything he didn't already think was obvious", which can include some surprises for someone without ADHD :) - then I can report that for at least one ADHD adult, it hasn't gotten any better with time. If I have instructions for one chore, then I can't also have two chores. I mean, sure, you can assign them, but I'll forget, and I'll wander around looking lost knowing I was supposed to be doing something.

sarahsweets
02-16-16, 05:02 AM
I just wanted to share that we've been making some wonderful strides with chore time.

We're doing a reward system where I have my son do one chore at a time. While he's doing the chore, I hide a ticket (I just went into word and created some ticket-looking things that say "Tickets for ...", printed them on card stock and cut them out.) When he's done with his chore, he gets to find it. Each ticket is worth time on electronics, or he can choose something out of a card box of things that I've made up (I got some index cards and wrote on them things like frozen yogurt, in-app purchases, picking a movie.) He says, "It's like Easter or a scavenger hunt every day!" So far so good.

This is really amazing and I want to commend you on your dedication and ability to be flexible with your son. Often parents dont get compliments for doing the right thing, only criticism for doing the wrong thing.

Caco3girl
02-16-16, 08:40 AM
Old familiar chores are easier in this regard than new ones. If there are instructions to keep track of - and by "instructions" I mean "anything he didn't already think was obvious", which can include some surprises for someone without ADHD :) -.

LOL, like the entire left side of the room! No exaggeration, I told my ADHD son to clean up the play room yesterday before he played outside, and he said he did. I walked in and things looked okay, until I turned around and NOTHING had been done to the left side of the room, only what he could see from the doorway! :faint:

Gryphonfyre
02-19-16, 03:59 PM
Thank you! Love him so so so much, I'm willing to try whatever necessary for him to feel loved, good about himself and successful.