View Full Version : Anyone familiar with HSP?


apoeticdevice
02-20-16, 11:59 PM
Is anyone here familiar with HSP/HCP?

I have always been curious about my sensitivity in all my sensors and looked it up and found out it's actually a thing. Is this real or am I just gullible? lol. Any info on this would be appreciated.

:D

ginniebean
02-21-16, 01:18 AM
I wish I knew what those acronyms mean, I'm too lazy to google.

Pixelatedmind
02-21-16, 01:19 AM
What does it stand for?

sarahsweets
02-21-16, 04:32 AM
I wish I knew what those acronyms mean, I'm too lazy to google.
HSP- Home style potatoes?

mctavish23
02-27-16, 12:57 PM
apoeticdevice,

As I'm sure you already know, HSP (Henoch-Schonlein Purpura) is a disorder which causes

inflammation of the small blood vessels, and is characterized by purple, rash like patches

on the skin; which can look like bruises. It can also lead to internal bleeding. Primarily

found in kids, it can also occur at any age. Having worked with kids for 30 years, I had

heard of it before, but never actually saw a case.

On the other hand, I had to look up HCP (Hereditary Coproporphria), as I'd never heard

of it. In the process, I learned that it's a very rare enzyme deficiency. Obviously, it

stands to reason that an ADHD Forum such as this, would have little information

available on either problem. Common sense suggest that you talk with your medical

provider about such complicated concerns. Good luck.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

Lunacie
02-27-16, 01:07 PM
Is anyone here familiar with HSP/HCP?

I have always been curious about my sensitivity in all my sensors and looked it up and found out it's actually a thing. Is this real or am I just gullible? lol. Any info on this would be appreciated.

:D

HSP = Highly Sensitive Person

The trouble is, this isn't recognized as a separate disorder by the professionals so there are many different names it goes by.

The most common seems to be SPD = Sensory Processing Disorder.

Yeah, I have it. It's very common among those who have autism, and somewhat common among those who have adhd.

mctavish23
02-27-16, 01:12 PM
Lunacie,

Thanks. Given the choices available, I like yours better.

tc

Robert

Cyllya
03-20-16, 04:55 PM
There's HSP and SPD, and though they share some similarities, I don't think they should be considered two different names for the same thing.

The "Highly Sensitive Person" crowd is very, very adamant that HSP should not be considered a disorder. It seems about 15-20% of the population is an HSP and it seems the prevailing theory is that it's some evolutionary side effect from environments that favored responsive and cautious behavior. It's not the same thing as introversion, but there seems to be a lot of correlation between introversion and HSP, plus they can lead to similar behavior, so the two ideas get get conflated a lot.

The author who popularized the HSP idea seems to have started providing info on "high sensation seeking," (HSS) which is the opposite problem.

Sensory Processing Disorder fka Sensory Integration Disorder is not in the DSM, but it's definitely a disorder, or at least a symptom of a disorder. It's horrible and reduces your quality of life. The folks who oppose having it go into DSM all seem to believe it's just a misdiagnosis of another condition (usually autism or ADHD). It does seem well-established that ADHD and ASD/autism almost always entail some degree of sensory issues, but it's not in the diagnostic criteria for ADHD, it was only recently added to the diagnostic criteria for ASD, and the ASD criteria only lists "hyper- or hypo-reactivity," so other aspects of sensory issues apparently don't "count" for an ASD diagnosis. I get the impression that ADHD people are more likely to be hyposensitive and sensation-seeking while ASD people are more likely to be hypersensitive, but that's just a trend. (I'm ADHD and hypersensitive.)

SPD includes both people who are hypersensitive or hyposensitive. It's possible for one person to have both problems (with different senses or in different situations).

Here's a PDF of some kind of study/review thing about HSP (http://scottbarrykaufman.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/Pers-Soc-Psychol-Rev-2012-Aron-1088868311434213.pdf). It says on the first page that it's "unrelated to 'sensory processing disorder,'" but it doesn't stop to compare and contrast the two.

I can't help but consider them related but distinct, that SPD is HSP/HSS gone awry that it is too extreme. By analogy, SPD is to crippling social anxiety what HSP/HSS is to being a little shy and slow to warm up to new people.