View Full Version : Anxiety and Panic Attacks.


RollerDerbyGrrl
02-28-16, 12:25 AM
Just wanted to share an article that I found very helpful.

http://www.sharischreiber.com/anxiety.html

ginniebean
02-28-16, 12:54 AM
For me, it was an allergic type reaction to coffee. I suspect coffee plays a larger role than people think. Or caffiene in general I think.

RollerDerbyGrrl
02-28-16, 01:46 AM
For me, it was an allergic type reaction to coffee. I suspect coffee plays a larger role than people think. Or caffiene in general I think.

I think smoking cigarettes is a huge thing for me. It really doesn't make sense because I'll smoke a cigarette when I'm stressed to calm me down, but it's proven that cigarettes cause anxiety.

But also I believe I never learned healthy coping mechanisms to deal with strong emotions like she mentions in the article.

sarahsweets
02-28-16, 10:43 AM
Smoking has always helped me calm down even they do say its a stimulant.

aeon
02-28-16, 03:09 PM
I think smoking cigarettes is a huge thing for me. It really doesn't make sense because I'll smoke a cigarette when I'm stressed to calm me down, but it's proven that cigarettes cause anxiety.

I was only a smoker for 9 months, and I dont do it any longer, but my experience was that a cigarette or two was always calming and soothing.

Id have to smoke more than a couple in a row to produce any anxiety effect, and nausea would usually present itself before any anxiety did.


Cheers,
Ian

KarmanMonkey
03-23-16, 11:35 AM
I think smoking cigarettes is a huge thing for me. It really doesn't make sense because I'll smoke a cigarette when I'm stressed to calm me down, but it's proven that cigarettes cause anxiety.

But also I believe I never learned healthy coping mechanisms to deal with strong emotions like she mentions in the article.

It's similar to alcohol being a depressant. They both have "blowback effects"

Say a cigarette gives you 5 points of calming, but an hour from now you'll get 6 points of anxiety, sometimes for an extended period of time. It eventually reaches the point where the "calming effect" is really just relief from withdrawl symptoms. There's also a link to suggest that smoking a cigarette can trigger a panic attack, though they still don't understand what's going on there.

There's also the human element that if you rely on smoking to calm you down, being in a situation where you know you can't smoke (e.g. business meeting, resteraunt on a date) can become a source of anxiety.

Lunacie
03-23-16, 12:32 PM
For me, it was an allergic type reaction to coffee. I suspect coffee plays a larger role than people think. Or caffiene in general I think.

For me, it's scents --- perfume, candles, aftershave, air freshener.

When we lived out in the boonies and I'd go to town for something, I generally stopped at the Alco store on my way home and used their bathroom.

They had an automatic air freshener that sprayed every time the door opened.

I would be fine in town but by the time I was few miles from home I'd be having road rages, I'd slam the back door coming in and snarl at anyone who dared to talk to me.

It took me years to make the connection between the change in my emotions and the air freshener in that bathroom.

Like the author says, I was taught as a child to bury those feelings rather than talking about them.

TheGreatKing
03-23-16, 12:42 PM
I personally get anxiety overthinking situations, i don't let it stop me living my life and i mean i never had a panic attack yet in my life so that's a plus.
Maybe i should start meditating, anyone have experience with meditation helping there anxiety?

KarmanMonkey
03-23-16, 01:29 PM
I can tell my "background" anxiety levels are high right now because even though I was expecting the person, and I heard them walking up to my front door this morning, I still jumped like someone fired a cannon when they rang the doorbell.

You're right, Lunacie, about the effect scent and chemicals can have on our mood; I sometimes dislike our "scent free" policy, but can definitely see the impact.

The right scent can be calming and therapeutic though. I just wish I could bottle the smell of freshly baked bread, or chocolate (though that probably wouldn't do my weight much good)

When I did a webinar on developing sensory diets (mostly for people with autism) one of the presenters mentioned using scented lip balms, and applying it to the person's wrist so they could get a whif of mint or strawberry or whatever when they wanted it. I also know someone who kept lavender essential oil with them and took a whif to settle their nerves for tests and interviews.

Scent is the sense that has the most powerful associations with memories, so being aware of our sensory needs and addressing them can make a big difference.

Lunacie
03-23-16, 01:36 PM
I can tell my "background" anxiety levels are high right now because even though I was expecting the person, and I heard them walking up to my front door this morning, I still jumped like someone fired a cannon when they rang the doorbell.

You're right, Lunacie, about the effect scent and chemicals can have on our mood; I sometimes dislike our "scent free" policy, but can definitely see the impact.

The right scent can be calming and therapeutic though. I just wish I could bottle the smell of freshly baked bread, or chocolate (though that probably wouldn't do my weight much good)

When I did a webinar on developing sensory diets (mostly for people with autism) one of the presenters mentioned using scented lip balms, and applying it to the person's wrist so they could get a whif of mint or strawberry or whatever when they wanted it. I also know someone who kept lavender essential oil with them and took a whif to settle their nerves for tests and interviews.

Scent is the sense that has the most powerful associations with memories, so being aware of our sensory needs and addressing them can make a big difference.

Yes, chocolate is very calming, both the smell and the taste.

Oddly, lavender doesn't calm me, although I don't get quite as bad a reaction to it.

I don't even know for sure I'd be okay with natural scents as opposed to chemical copies.

KarmanMonkey
04-01-16, 03:53 PM
The essential oils aren't really chemical copies; they're the real scent. By that I mean that they use a distilation process where they steam or cook the original material in a soup, then they collect the steam and skim off the scent oils that are carried with it.

In other words, with most essential oils, if you react poorly to the oil, you'll react poorly to the original source too.

Or were you talking about things like air fresheners, deoderants, perfumes, etc? In which case, yeah, most of them are nasty chemicals that only vaguely resemble the scents they're supposed to mimic. :-)

menownotthem
06-27-16, 07:37 AM
It's similar to alcohol being a depressant. They both have "blowback effects"

Say a cigarette gives you 5 points of calming, but an hour from now you'll get 6 points of anxiety, sometimes for an extended period of time. It eventually reaches the point where the "calming effect" is really just relief from withdrawl symptoms. There's also a link to suggest that smoking a cigarette can trigger a panic attack, though they still don't understand what's going on there.

There's also the human element that if you rely on smoking to calm you down, being in a situation where you know you can't smoke (e.g. business meeting, resteraunt on a date) can become a source of anxiety.


The whole alcohol thing, yes I agree its a depressant, and I am depressed and in pain, so at 12 midnight when pain meds dont work and having a drink does what am I supposed to do?

KarmanMonkey
07-14-16, 01:35 PM
The whole alcohol thing, yes I agree its a depressant, and I am depressed and in pain, so at 12 midnight when pain meds dont work and having a drink does what am I supposed to do?

In that case I'd have the drink at midnight, then the next day keep on looking for other things that will help.

Alcohol isn't a supreme evil; it just comes at a cost; it interferes with sleep, it's a depressant, and it has a number of other negative impacts on your health. Sometimes, though, it's the only tool left in your tool belt. There's always new tools to build and practice with, but when you're in pain and not able to sleep at midnight; that's not the time to try new things. That's the time of day to do what works so you can sleep and be able to practice new things in the morning.

AddAnxiousMe
07-15-16, 04:27 AM
I used to smoke a lot when I was a younger man but quit many years ago. I can say that a cigarette always calmed me down, but NOT CAFFEINE! I know they're both stimulants, but they most certainly (at least for me) don't work in the same way. But please, DO NOT SMOKE to calm your nerves. My lungs are still dealing with the effects of heavy cigarette use. And I might also add that everybody should be leery of marijuana, that stuff is not benign. I had some terrible panic attacks messing with that stuff when I was younger, and it can definitely leave some people with anxiety/panic disorders after a bad experience with it. I've read that the ERs in Colorado have experienced an increase in marijuana related panic and other types of psychotic reactions from marijuana use since legalization. Some people even flipped out from laced cookies and candies they sell. It seems that many people vacation there just to freely smoke some weed and wind up in the ER. Don't believe people who say "just smoke a little weed for your nerves." I know it's everybody's own choice, and that not everyone has bad reactions, but it is definitely not worth the risk, IMO.

brianelad
09-21-16, 07:14 PM
I was only a smoker for 9 months, and I dont do it any longer, but my experience was that a cigarette or two was always calming and soothing.

Id have to smoke more than a couple in a row to produce any anxiety effect, and nausea would usually present itself before any anxiety did.


Cheers,
Ian
The best remedy for anxity is not cigarette