View Full Version : has sleep deprivation been an asset at times?


baical
03-04-16, 10:56 AM
to me it has. there was an article I read something about sleep deprivation (while not recommended) boosts dopamine. I think I read it from howstuff works (?). Something about being deprive of sleep gets me motivated to getting things done and I do get it done compared to when I'm a bit relaxed. While I haven't tried Adderall yet, I think sleep deprivation is like Adderall, it gives you that peripheral "kick", whereas Vyvanse and or Dexedrine is a bit calming. Maybe my ADHD doesn't respond to something that's calming? Does it mean I could use a bit of the levoamphetamine that Adderall and Evekeo has? Does Desoxyn have this "kick" I think I may need? Lots of reviews of Desoxyn stated it is just as calming, so I don't know.

Sleep deprivation dopaminergic productivity can feel a bit "psychotic" type of productivity. I've felt this only at times with Vyvanse, and or Dexedrine but it seems to fade as if it just couldn't penetrate my brain "right". It isn't persistent as I'd like it to be or it needs another compound for it to be persistent which I find sometimes with caffeine. The drink called BAI has green coffee extract and that type of caffeine gave a kick to my Dexedrine 15 mg. I do not drink coffee. The McDonald's sweet tea can give some kick but it isn't as persistent.

I actually do not know what "peripheral" means when it comes to what people are describing Adderall to be. If anyone can explain what "peripheral" means regarding Adderall? Below is what peripheral means and it could mean a whole lot of things. LOL.

adjective, Also, peripheric (for defs 1–3).
1.
pertaining to, situated in, or constituting the periphery:
peripheral resistance on the outskirts of the battle area.
2.
concerned with relatively minor, irrelevant, or superficial aspects of the subject in question.
3.
Anatomy. near the surface or outside of; external.
4.
Computers. of or relating to a peripheral.

The #2 meaning seem to be related to what ADHDers are, which is why they (me and you, us) aren't as assertive as we'd like to be as we are distracted by "minor" things that doesn't seem to be minor to us ADHDers.

Fuzzy12
03-04-16, 12:47 PM
I've heard of that but personally, it doesn't seem to apply to me. What I've found though is that usually when I'm extremely sleep deprived it's for a reason. Something important, like deadlines, that mean that I don't have time to sleep. So usually, after a sleep deprived night when I'm working on meeting my deadline I'm super alert and focussed, etc. I think, it's the deadline though that is giving me the dopamine boost rather than the sleep deprivation. Once I've made my deadline my brain starts falling apart and I'm useless till I get some sleep.

dvdnvwls
03-04-16, 02:14 PM
In the same way that setting fire to your house improves your ability to get out of the house on time, yes, it works. The question is, is it worth it to you to ruin everything in order to do whatever it is you're wanting to do. Mostly, the answer is "If it's really important, then I guess so, but only for one night".

aeon
03-04-16, 10:31 PM
I am aware of a change in serotonergic level and activity related to sleep disruption/deprivation, and for that matter, related to oversleeping, but nothing related to dopaminergic activity.

I enjoy the brain buzz from sleep deprivation as it relates to low serotonin. That said, it comes at a terrible cost, both short- and long-term, so I do not pursue or encourage it in any way.


Cheers,
Ian

baical
03-07-16, 05:26 AM
I'm not getting what you're saying here; is oversleeping a problem as well with regards to serotonin? I just slept for 14 hours, I can't say I feel any good.

I am aware of a change in serotonergic level and activity related to sleep disruption/deprivation, and for that matter, related to oversleeping, but nothing related to dopaminergic activity.

I enjoy the brain buzz from sleep deprivation as it relates to low serotonin. That said, it comes at a terrible cost, both short- and long-term, so I do not pursue or encourage it in any way.


Cheers,
Ian

aeon
03-07-16, 08:38 AM
I'm not getting what you're saying here; is oversleeping a problem as well with regards to serotonin? I just slept for 14 hours, I can't say I feel any good.

Yes, too much sleep will tend to leave you tired and lifeless.

That goes away over the hours, but it is a crap way to wake up, especially for someone with ADHD.


Cheers,
Ian

dvdnvwls
03-07-16, 01:09 PM
I think it's generally agreed that for each person there is an amount of sleep that's just right for them, and if they get much less or much more sleep than that, it isn't as good. For the average person, that amount is usually something like seven to nine hours - it's good to start out with the assumption that you are average, and adjust from there as necessary.

ginniebean
03-07-16, 01:48 PM
My own experience says otherwise. Sleep depravtion characterizes the worst times in my life and they were far from productive in fact i was paralyzed almost.

dvdnvwls
03-07-16, 02:43 PM
My own experience says otherwise. Sleep depravtion characterizes the worst times in my life and they were far from productive in fact i was paralyzed almost.
In general, I agree. However, I think there's a sort of chance effect that happens for some people with ADHD, where getting ourselves so tired that our hyperactivity shuts down gives us a little window of opportunity.