View Full Version : Cheese bad for ADHD?


Abcdef
03-12-16, 05:42 PM
I rarely eat it now so have noticed the difference when I do-particularly cheddar cheese.

To back up my theory it has been said that most yellow foods are bad for ADHD, excluding bananas because the good stuff inside is actually considered white.

Does anyone's symptoms get worse after eating cheese?

Edit: I never put this in the nutrition section because it's a ghost town in there. I know it may sound a bit petty and almost comical considering it's "cheese", but it makes a considerable difference eliminating it from my diet, so if it could help at least one person it would be a result!

daveddd
03-12-16, 06:08 PM
have you considered being tested for lactose intolerance?

Abcdef
03-12-16, 06:19 PM
have you considered being tested for lactose intolerance?

I can digest dairy without any problems, no family history of it ether.

Honestly, dairy in general is bad news for ADHD, I used to drink milk by the gallon when I was younger and maybe that contributed greatly to increasing my symptoms.

Unmanagable
03-12-16, 06:20 PM
I feel we all are lactose intolerant, since cow's milk isn't meant for human consumption, but that's just me. Dairy is a major mucus and pus former, too, and doesn't really "do a body good".

I've read many things but don't have them all saved up for quick reference. But I might have to get on that for my own brain's sake. Thanks for the inspiration. :)

I used to eat cheese damn near daily. Cheddar was my favorite. I'd slice 3 or 4 pieces and eat it by itself, put it in my eggs every morning, on my sandwich at lunch, and melt some into whatever I threw together for dinner. Cheese flavored snacks ruled the roost, too.

Haven't had it in 11 months. I feel incredible compared to this time last year. But I also eliminated meat and eggs at the same time, so I can't give cheese all the credit.

daveddd
03-12-16, 06:23 PM
just thought of it, cause dairy doesn't effect my ADHD


unless i eat a whole ben and jerry

Abcdef
03-12-16, 06:42 PM
I feel we all are lactose intolerant, since cow's milk isn't meant for human consumption, but that's just me. Dairy is a major mucus and pus former, too, and doesn't really "do a body good".

I've read many things but don't have them all saved up for quick reference. But I might have to get on that for my own brain's sake. Thanks for the inspiration. :)

I used to eat cheese damn near daily. Cheddar was my favorite. I'd slice 3 or 4 pieces and eat it by itself, put it in my eggs every morning, on my sandwich at lunch, and melt some into whatever I threw together for dinner. Cheese flavored snacks ruled the roost, too.

Haven't had it in 11 months. I feel incredible compared to this time last year. But I also eliminated meat and eggs at the same time, so I can't give cheese all the credit.

Yes I suppose everyone is intolerant, physically and mentally...but the latter is overlooked because it could be a variation of anything.

I remember when I was younger I used to make a cheese toastie and wash it down with a big glass of milk.....I always felt lethargic afterwards, not a great start to the day.

I don't think it's all down to cheese- meat, eggs and milk all contain animal hormones which are a major concern but for me cheese is best avoided.

Abcdef
03-12-16, 06:48 PM
just thought of it, cause dairy doesn't effect my ADHD


unless i eat a whole ben and jerry

I could eat a whole tub of chunky monkey and not feel half as bad as if I'd ate a couple slices of cheese :lol:

I think you should take the cheese challenge for one day daveddd, compare with and without.

aeon
03-12-16, 06:58 PM
I feel we all are lactose intolerant, since cow's milk isn't meant for human consumption, but that's just me.

Exactly, it is for...calves! :) That said, some people tolerate it just fine, and have the gut flora to do so.

Dairy is a major mucus and pus former, too, and doesn't really "do a body good".

Why do you say dairy is a major mucus and pus former? Links?

I thought pus was the end product of infections, i.e., the mass of dead macrophages and suchlike, so in order to have pus, you have to have an infection. How does dairy contribute to this?

As for mucoid plaque...hello pseudoscience! :yes:

I used to eat cheese damn near daily.

A soldier for the USDA! :faint:

In any case, if you are happy and healthy, great.


Cheers,
Ian

aeon
03-12-16, 06:59 PM
To back up my theory it has been said that most yellow foods are bad for ADHD, excluding bananas because the good stuff inside is actually considered white.

By whom? Links? Citations?


Wondering,
Ian

Abcdef
03-12-16, 07:06 PM
By whom? Links? Citations?


Wondering,
Ian


"Food Diet for ADHD" from Stepping Stones Psych Care (http://www.printfriendly.com/print/?source=homepage&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.sspcare.com%2Findex.php%2Ffyi %2Fnutrition%2Fadhd-diet)

aeon
03-12-16, 07:08 PM
"Food Diet for ADHD" from Stepping Stones Psych Care (http://www.printfriendly.com/print/?source=homepage&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.sspcare.com%2Findex.php%2Ffyi %2Fnutrition%2Fadhd-diet)

Zero citations and mention of Dr. Amen. :doh:


Nevermind,
Ian

Lunacie
03-12-16, 07:12 PM
"Food Diet for ADHD" from Stepping Stones Psych Care (http://www.printfriendly.com/print/?source=homepage&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.sspcare.com%2Findex.php%2Ffyi %2Fnutrition%2Fadhd-diet)

I don't understand that link. First it says this:

Eat a high-protein diet, including beans, cheese, eggs, meat, and nuts.

Then a little further down it says this:

Another dairy food to avoid when trying to avoid sparking ADHD symptoms is cheese.


How can cheese be both good for you and bad for you at the same time?

Unmanagable
03-12-16, 07:42 PM
I'll dig for all the reading material after dinner and share what I can round up in my history.

Google may likely produce some for ya' until I can get to it.

Much of what I've been told through the years is only pseudoscience has been just the things that have helped me the most. Go figure.

Abcdef
03-12-16, 07:51 PM
I don't understand that link. First it says this:



Then a little further down it says this:



How can cheese be both good for you and bad for you at the same time?


Yeah I didn't get that ether lol, maybe that was a bad link to post.

But hell, I'm talking from years of experience- I am a living, talking link :)

Why would I make this up?

I'm not a farmer, vegan, or even a veggie-just someone who is sharing their honest experience and trying to help others.

N.B Please extinguish your torches and put down the pitchforks before you enter the thread :D

Abcdef
03-12-16, 07:58 PM
Zero citations and mention of Dr. Amen. :doh:


Nevermind,
Ian

"Life After Cheese!" (http://www.printfriendly.com/print/?source=homepage&url=https%3A%2F%2Faliaalmoayed.wordpress.com%2F200 9%2F07%2F02%2Flife-after-cheese%2F)

http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/2006/12.07/11-dairy.html

"Hormones in Milk: Does It Always Do a Body Good?" (http://www.printfriendly.com/print/?source=homepage&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.metaboliceffect.com%2Fhormone s-in-milk%2F)

That took a 1 minute search...once you have read this give me a shout..I'll link you some more :D

namazu
03-12-16, 08:16 PM
If you've found that cheese (or dairy in general, or other food) consistently makes your ADHD symptoms worse, then it makes sense to avoid it.

I'm unaware of any good evidence that cheese is, as a rule, a particular problem for people with ADHD (who aren't also lactose-intolerant or allergic).

Dietary treatment of ADHD was very much in fashion in the 1970s-1980s, and since then, there have been a succession of food-restriction diets (sugar-free, artificial coloring-free, dairy-free, gluten-free, Feingold, etc....) that have purported to benefit people with ADHD (especially children). These diets seem, anecdotally, to help a minority of people (some of whom may have genuine sensitivities to these ingredients), and limiting sugar and artificial additives isn't bad advice in general. But there's limited scientific evidence to suggest that these types of diets make a clinically-relevant difference for most people with ADHD, and they can be difficult to maintain.

In recent years, there have been some new studies that once again point a finger at dietary sensitivities, though in a more general way. These studies have suggested that a larger number of kids than previously thought may have food sensitivities, but that the sensitivities seem to be pretty individual. (So, fewer blanket "don't eat this if you have ADHD"-type recommendations, but more "see which, if any, foods affect you/your kid and don't eat those".)

Most of the studies on dietary interventions for ADHD -- past and present -- have had serious methodological limitations. That's partly because dietary interventions can be difficult to maintain and to study in a rigorous way, especially over longer periods of time. There's a free review paper that goes into more detail here: [JT Nigg and K Holton. (2014) Restriction and Elimination Diets in ADHD Treatment. Child Adolesc Psychiatr Clin N Am. 23(4): 937–953. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4322780/)]

My gut sense (no pun intended!) from all I've read is that a minority of people with ADHD genuinely do benefit from eliminating certain foods or additives from their diet. (And I tend to disagree with those who claim that if this helps, then you "must not really have had ADHD" to begin with, given that ADHD appears to be somewhat heterogeneous.)

Even if only a minority of people with ADHD are likely to see major improvements in our ADHD symptoms with a restriction diet, most of us would benefit broadly from eating more healthfully, not spiking blood sugar, getting exercise, etc. (<--- note to self: take own advice ;))

Dietary changes may not be a prescription for everyone, though people who've noticed a link between eating a food (any food) and increases in their ADHD symptoms would be wise to follow up with allergy testing and/or with dietary experimentation.

Dietary approaches also don't necessarily have to be mutually exclusive with other treatment approaches -- and sometimes shouldn't be, especially when the food sensitivity situation is unclear and treatment is urgently needed to prevent serious or worsening impairment. If you then find that the restriction diets make a big difference, great! And if not, you learned what doesn't work for you, and you can continue to pursue treatment that does work for you.

Abcdef
03-12-16, 09:22 PM
If you've found that cheese (or dairy in general, or other food) consistently makes your ADHD symptoms worse, then it makes sense to avoid it.

I'm unaware of any good evidence that cheese is, as a rule, a particular problem for people with ADHD (who aren't also lactose-intolerant or allergic).

Dietary treatment of ADHD was very much in fashion in the 1970s-1980s, and since then, there have been a succession of food-restriction diets (sugar-free, artificial coloring-free, dairy-free, gluten-free, Feingold, etc....) that have purported to benefit people with ADHD (especially children). These diets seem, anecdotally, to help a minority of people (some of whom may have genuine sensitivities to these ingredients), and limiting sugar and artificial additives isn't bad advice in general. But there's limited scientific evidence to suggest that these types of diets make a clinically-relevant difference for most people with ADHD, and they can be difficult to maintain.

In recent years, there have been some new studies that once again point a finger at dietary sensitivities, though in a more general way. These studies have suggested that a larger number of kids than previously thought may have food sensitivities, but that the sensitivities seem to be pretty individual. (So, fewer blanket "don't eat this if you have ADHD"-type recommendations, but more "see which, if any, foods affect you/your kid and don't eat those".)

Most of the studies on dietary interventions for ADHD -- past and present -- have had serious methodological limitations. That's partly because dietary interventions can be difficult to maintain and to study in a rigorous way, especially over longer periods of time. There's a free review paper that goes into more detail here: [JT Nigg and K Holton. (2014) Restriction and Elimination Diets in ADHD Treatment. Child Adolesc Psychiatr Clin N Am. 23(4): 937–953. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4322780/)]

My gut sense (no pun intended!) from all I've read is that a minority of people with ADHD genuinely do benefit from eliminating certain foods or additives from their diet. (And I tend to disagree with those who claim that if this helps, then you "must not really have had ADHD" to begin with, given that ADHD appears to be somewhat heterogeneous.)

Even if only a minority of people with ADHD are likely to see major improvements in our ADHD symptoms with a restriction diet, most of us would benefit broadly from eating more healthfully, not spiking blood sugar, getting exercise, etc. (<--- note to self: take own advice ;))

Dietary changes may not be a prescription for everyone, though people who've noticed a link between eating a food (any food) and increases in their ADHD symptoms would be wise to follow up with allergy testing and/or with dietary experimentation.

Dietary approaches also don't necessarily have to be mutually exclusive with other treatment approaches -- and sometimes shouldn't be, especially when the food sensitivity situation is unclear and treatment is urgently needed to prevent serious or worsening impairment. If you then find that the restriction diets make a big difference, great! And if not, you learned what doesn't work for you, and you can continue to pursue treatment that does work for you.

We are all made up differently so diet changes may or may not work for certain people, just like various meds work for some and not for others.

I am by all means not cured of adhd with a healthy diet, but I do notice a difference with a combination of the right foods and meds.

Although I'm not positive a good diet may help everyone, I would bet any money that what you put in your stomach will affect how efficient your meds are. People forget that it has to get processed in the gut before it reaches the brain.

sarahsweets
03-12-16, 10:51 PM
Vyvanse works once it reaches the guy but don't other stimulants work in the blood stream brain blood barrier sort of way?

aeon
03-12-16, 10:55 PM
"Life After Cheese!" (http://www.printfriendly.com/print/?source=homepage&url=https%3A%2F%2Faliaalmoayed.wordpress.com%2F200 9%2F07%2F02%2Flife-after-cheese%2F)

http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/2006/12.07/11-dairy.html

"Hormones in Milk: Does It Always Do a Body Good?" (http://www.printfriendly.com/print/?source=homepage&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.metaboliceffect.com%2Fhormone s-in-milk%2F)

That took a 1 minute search...once you have read this give me a shout..I'll link you some more :D

Zero citations provided for the original assertion.

Hitchens’s Razor! ;)


Still waiting,
Ian

Unmanagable
03-12-16, 11:11 PM
Let me try this again.....having technical difficulties:

Exactly, it is for...calves! :) That said, some people tolerate it just fine, and have the gut flora to do so.

[I]Just because we can doesn't mean we should. May their flora continue to treat them kindly. Unlike the way the cows get treated to provide them with something their bodies don't require.


Why do you say dairy is a major mucus and pus former? Links?

My first introduction to it was via mucusfreelife.com. Mastitis and other infections, the amount of pus per units that's allowed in the milk for human consumption, ANY amount is enough to gross me out.

I did a quick look for links, but don't have the patience or desire to launch into research mode tonight. If I happen upon them again, I'll certainly share.

I thought pus was the end product of infections, i.e., the mass of dead macrophages and suchlike, so in order to have pus, you have to have an infection. How does dairy contribute to this?

Not all cows are healthy. Not all of the places we get it from employ 100% honest people. I don't trust industries and alphabet agencies, personally.

Especially ones promoting and profiting from the treatment that occurs in the dairy industry. I've seen much of it first hand from living in an area surrounded by dairy farmers.

As for mucoid plaque...hello pseudoscience! :yes:

If that's your belief, and an apparent celebratory one at that, then it seems your mind is already made up.

However, I've experienced the release of much of it, and hope to see more of it. We're all way more full of s*** than we think.

Hard, rubbery, extremely pungent, and almost charcoal black. It comes out in pieces and isn't as dense as the rest of the stool. It floats, and often doesn't flush with the rest, either.

That's how I discovered the differences, initially, and it's a little hard to provide a link for that. There are many people who have photographed and documented their experiences and share them for the world to learn from, though, if you wish to dive deeper.

A soldier for the USDA! :faint:

In any case, if you are happy and healthy, great.

Thanks. Happier and healthier than I recall ever feeling, thanks to the drastic dietary changes, even though I'm not a walking reference library of scientifically acceptable proof to satisfy others as to what has helped me.

I read what crosses my path, use what resonates deeply and what I remember as I discover it, experiment healthily, hopefully, and either live with or learn from the lessons.

That's all I've got. And so far, thankfully, it's been more than enough. And I've finally accepted that I'm the only one I truly have to satisfy in that regard.

namazu
03-12-16, 11:12 PM
Vyvanse works once it reaches the guy but don't other stimulants work in the blood stream brain blood barrier sort of way?
Vyvanse is only "activated" when enzymes in the digestive tract convert it from the prodrug (lisdexamphetamine) into the active form (dextroamphetamine).

The other ADHD meds are already in their "active" forms.

The meds that are taken orally still have to be absorbed through the digestive tract before making it into the bloodstream. (Daytrana, which is a methylphenidate skin patch, bypasses digestion altogether.)

There are some studies that suggest that eating breakfast with the meds makes a difference in terms of absorption, and others that claim it doesn't.

My personal experience is that whether or not I've eaten a substantial breakfast seems to make a difference in terms of how I feel and whether I get side effects -- though I'm not sure how much of that is actual difference in absorption vs. having food in my system in general.

Fuzzy12
03-13-16, 03:35 AM
Zero citations provided for the original assertion.

Hitchens’s Razor! ;)


Still waiting,
Ian

Aeon, If no references or satisfactory explanations are provided another option might be to just move on from this particular discussion. Some people, I guess, at times just want to share their experiences (in peace) rather than discuss and prove the science of it.

Hitchen's razor only applies if you actually want to convince someone.

Op, I'm also wondering if you might be allergic to any of the ingredients in cheese.

aeon
03-13-16, 11:22 AM
Aeon, If no references or satisfactory explanations are provided another option might be to just move on from this particular discussion. Some people, I guess, at times just want to share their experiences (in peace) rather than discuss and prove the science of it.

Fair enough, and when someone shares of their experience and owns that, I have no problem with it.

That said, when comments are made offhand that do not speak to experience, but call into question the validity of a rational idea, I might question it.

Inasmuch as this is a public forum, I think there is a social responsibility to question assertions that are of a non-personal nature when they assert without evidence.

Hitchen's razor only applies if you actually want to convince someone.

Understood. By starting their sentence with “To back up my theory it has been said,” my sense was that was exactly what they were doing.


Cheers,
Ian

Fuzzy12
03-14-16, 07:11 AM
Fair enough, and when someone shares of their experience and owns that, I have no problem with it.

That said, when comments are made offhand that do not speak to experience, but call into question the validity of a rational idea, I might question it.

Inasmuch as this is a public forum, I think there is a social responsibility to question assertions that are of a non-personal nature when they assert without evidence.



Understood. By starting their sentence with “To back up my theory it has been said,” my sense was that was exactly what they were doing.


Cheers,
Ian


I think, you have fulfilled your social responsibility by questioning the claims and asking for references thrice.

ginniebean
03-14-16, 10:42 AM
While food studies have shown pretty conclusively that diet doesn't cause or even affect the symptoms of adhd much with the exception of some chemical dyes, we're people, we have food allergies and sensitivities, like other people do. I can't take cheese, I don't digest it well and it sits like lead and makes me uncomfortable. I eat a high protein, high veggie, low carb diet and it makes me feel great. A lot of discomforts I once had no longer are present.

I just don't think it has anything to do with adhd, a good environment can always help and food is a big part of our environment.

BellaVita
03-14-16, 06:05 PM
I rarely eat it now so have noticed the difference when I do-particularly cheddar cheese.

To back up my theory it has been said that most yellow foods are bad for ADHD, excluding bananas because the good stuff inside is actually considered white.

Does anyone's symptoms get worse after eating cheese?

Edit: I never put this in the nutrition section because it's a ghost town in there. I know it may sound a bit petty and almost comical considering it's "cheese", but it makes a considerable difference eliminating it from my diet, so if it could help at least one person it would be a result!

I am lactose-intolerant, so I take a pill daily called Digestive Advantage and it works very well. Seriously - if you have troubles digesting dairy and don't want to completely give it up I HIGHLY suggest this pill it works better than all the others I've tried. Thankfully with the pill cheese doesn't really mess me up, and I try my best to not eat too much of it.

When I was a kid though...oh boy.
Food with dairy in it, especially things like icecream, not only gave me the worst stomach ache imaginable and diarrhea, but I would get ANGRY! (The anger would hit before the stomach issues)

I have only read about one other person in a blog post who had mood issues from dairy....but yeah, when I suddenly became very angry people would ask if I had dairy and the answer was usually yes.

Now it doesn't really do that (the anger response) only a (maybe less-than) handful amount of times in the last 2.5 years.

sarahsweets
03-15-16, 05:01 AM
Honestly? It depends on the type of cheese and how bad it smells. ;)

TheFitFatty
03-15-16, 05:34 AM
I LOVE cheese. I will never, ever give it up. In fact, in the past when I've been dieting, I've lost more weight when I keep dairy in my diet then when I cut it out.

Roundmouth
03-15-16, 08:18 AM
have you considered being tested for lactose intolerance?

There's usually no lactose in hard cheese. However, allergy towards milk protein is a possibility.

br3akingchains
07-12-16, 06:05 AM
Or less lactose in aged cheese...so little they call it lactose free but to those with severe sensitivities it can ruin their day.

I don't believe for me it's cheese, I believe I have a milk allergy. A milk allergy explains why the chocolate caramel candy 'Rolo' knocks me out, wether I took meds 30 minutes earlier or not. Same thing happens to me with raisenettes and Hershey's kisses....I've given up on milk chocolate, lol.

I've also noticed worse symptoms when eating gluten. Today I'm starting a gluten free/casein free diet to see how it works out. Maybe I'll stop by the Drs office to get tested for allergies

Roundmouth
07-13-16, 06:55 AM
have you considered being tested for lactose intolerance?

In hard cheese there is no lactose. A lot of milk protein though.

C15H25N3O
07-13-16, 07:52 AM
Sorry for all who have a lactose-conspiracy.

But cheese should be quite good for ADHD due to the fact it contains most L-Tyrosine of all foods
and is the a main resource for dopa, dopamine, katecholamines, melanin, thyroxine and tyramine.

Have a look at wikipedia.

I experienced very good ADHD-conditions eating cheese, vegetables and meat but very low carbs.
But I also must mention the cheese I eat is only hard cheese.