View Full Version : "How Stress Affects Your Body" (4:42 TedEd Video)


Unmanagable
03-27-16, 11:14 AM
Learning more about stress and the depth of the effects on my body has proven to be monumental in helping me realize where many of my symptoms are/were rooted.

May it be equally helpful to others in whatever way best suits individual needs:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v-t1Z5-oPtU

Greyhound1
03-27-16, 11:35 AM
Thanks for the video! Managing stress and anxiety is my biggest challenge in life. It stresses me out to know how bad stress is for us. It's a self perpetuating loop.

I have made some baby steps in handling it more effectively but not nearly enough. Mindfulness has been the only thing to sorta help. I can't seem to focus enough to meditate at all.

Unmanagable
03-27-16, 11:48 AM
I had to eventually redefine how I viewed the term "meditate" to have it become effective for me.

I initially viewed it, based on all the stuff I read about it, as meaning to be able to sit still and be quiet and not think of a damn thing. Beep. Wrong answer. lol

I discovered meditation in motion, doing the things I most love, on purpose, discovering beauty I never took the time for, creating beauty where it was sorely lacking, and learning to connect with self on a level I truly understood, within.

In order to reach that depth, I had to immerse myself in spaces where others practiced it as a way of life. I had to allow myself to be taught one on one by others who had already found it within themselves. Then, and luckily, it finally clicked.

Not having the f/t job stressors hanging over my head daily was the gateway relief to finding what all works for me.

I found it impossible to healthily recognize my stress triggers while drowning and being repeatedly suppressed in the very environment that brought it ALL to the surface.

Greyhound1
03-27-16, 11:57 AM
I like how you redefined meditation and the term meditation in motion. That makes a lot of sense.

Remembering to take the time "to stop and smell the roses" is basically what you mean?

Unmanagable
03-27-16, 12:05 PM
I like how you redefined meditation and the term meditation in motion. That makes a lot of sense.

Remembering to take the time "to stop and smell the roses" is basically what you mean?

Pretty much. Make time to stop and smell the roses that bring the most life and healing energy out of you.

If you enjoy nature, but never make time for it, then figure out a way to bring it to you.

Anything from getting a plant, planting something, taking a daily walk in it, making time to listen to the birds, being near a natural water source, etc.

Grounding self within self via the things you love, and doing it on purpose vs. waiting until you find time, because we tend to stop looking for the time when buried under stress.

Pencil it in on your calendar if that helps. Make an appointment with self daily. Increase the time increments as you practice, at least bi-weekly, or you'll likely get stuck in a rut, as I did. No major increases, just slowly and steadily.

Priority must absolutely be on self in order to build the foundation that can withstand all the stress others stack upon us. It's in no way selfish, it is VERY necessary.

Greyhound1
03-27-16, 12:26 PM
Priority must absolutely be on self in order to build the foundation that can withstand all the stress others stack upon us. It's in no way selfish, it is VERY necessary.

Very well said!
I agree 100%. I just wish, I could realize it in the moment when I need it the most. I usually feel guilty, selfish or slack when I can turn my attention away from stress to something more enjoyable. It doesn't last long normally because it's not enjoyable having these feelings either.

Unmanagable
03-27-16, 12:51 PM
Feeling all the feelings. What no one ever prepared us for.

They just taught us how to suppress what we felt to be able to accomplish what we're told we need to accomplish. Period.

Fake it til we make it.

We were sort of set up for failure, in so many ways.

In my opinion, we're all pretty bad a** just to make it from one day to the next in these crazy a** times.

Mad props to us for getting this far.

Twiggy
03-27-16, 01:16 PM
Unmanagable, thank you for your thread and your posts about meditation in motion. You have very good advice.

My boyfriend is always very stressed out and that stress always turns into anger very quickly.
I will try to get him to de-stress using your methods.

Greyhound1
03-27-16, 01:46 PM
Feeling all the feelings. What no one ever prepared us for.

They just taught us how to suppress what we felt to be able to accomplish what we're told we need to accomplish. Period.

Fake it til we make it.

We were sort of set up for failure, in so many ways.

In my opinion, we're all pretty bad a** just to make it from one day to the next in these crazy a** times.

Mad props to us for getting this far.

:thankyou::goodpost:
My whole life has been fake it till you make it. I just assumed or realized at a young age that it was the only way I could get by.

My whole life feels like it's been one big fake acting role.

I need to spread around more green reps. or I would have for your posts!

BellaVita
03-27-16, 04:37 PM
Wow, this video was eye-opening. I already knew lots of the info, but just hearing it again was like a "slap in the face." (I apologize if that is the wrong metaphor, I am terrible with metaphors)

When I went to a doctor for bio/neurofeedback sessions as a child, the doctor became very worried about me and my stress levels.

He told my parents, over and over, that if I didn't have less stress in my life NOW I would definitely end up sick and in the hospital.

Sadly, they couldn't care less, and his predictions came true.

I've been hospitalized countless times for many things - gastritis, heart issues, nutrient deficiency, Crohn's partial blockage, infections, several ruptured cysts, the list goes on....

I've been diagnosed with stomach ulcers, intestinal ulcers, ulcerations, intestinal inflammation, chronic and often severe constipation(basically, all stuff with Crohn's) GERD....

And then I have C-PTSD, and anxiety disorders, and wake up several times each night due to nightmares and adrenaline....

Also, when I'm stressed I cannot eat.

I can't wait to one day be able to have treatment.

I manage by eating foods that won't trigger me, taking a digestive aid that has probiotics, take stool softeners, daily ibuprofen, using nicotine patches, spending time with my dog, and daily exercise. And receiving love from myself and love from others.

But I also fear that I might die young, as my body slowly eats itself. I know all of this stress is destroying me, that this is the result of stressful abuse for many years and now my body has just failed me. It couldn't take it anymore and these are the results.

Sorry that was dark, just very real concerns I have that keep me up at night sometimes.

Unmanagable
03-27-16, 04:56 PM
I have very similar concerns, to be honest, Bella. I remain amazed I made it this long.

Even when we find a treatment that helps one thing, it often creates the rapid deterioration of something else, and the domino effect begins.

We are stuck in a state of having to simply choose the lesser evil, so to speak, in so many arenas.

Although many of the arenas no longer leave us much of a choice, it's "take what you can get and just be damn glad for it, even if it does greatly lessen the quality and or length of your life".

Wishing our health and state of overall well-being wasn't so easily taken for granted by so many who stand to profit from our suffering, and by those who are too overworked to even pay attention to new/old findings or methods of addressing our struggles. It saddens and sickens me daily.

aeon
03-27-16, 05:13 PM
And when the stress is chronic and inescapable, and you are a young child
whose brain is still plastic, you become stuck in a stressful state, forever
swimming in a dead sea of cortisol.

Itís no wonder people with high ACE scores have all manner of later poor health
outcomes and early death.

That I had high blood pressure, high cholesterol, type 2 diabetes,
lifelong insomnia, and had suffered a stroke by age 39 was no accident.

Iíve had my cortisol tested. My cortisol level at a restful state is at a level that should
suggest, e.g., I am being chased by a bear. :doh:

I isolate myself and control my sensory inputs so I have a safe,
predictable environment where I will not be overloaded by stimuli.

Thatís a life, but thatís not living.

Stress-relieving techniques really do work, but you canít use a broken
system to fix a broken system.

Give me some ******* lorazepam already.

This part of being alive drains so much potential out of everything.

It takes a lot of energy to be hypervigilant. Always on guard, always on watch.

To never know, on a body level, what it means to relax. :faint:

Stress. I canít escape it. It is literally a part of my being, stuck in the
ďonĒ position.

I donít mean to sound morbid or melodramatic, but knowing I can eat
a shotgun and make this hell stop if I really need to is comforting to me.


Whatever,
Ian

Little Missy
03-27-16, 06:48 PM
And when the stress is chronic and inescapable, and you are a young child
whose brain is still plastic, you become stuck in a stressful state, forever
swimming in a dead sea of cortisol.

Itís no wonder people with high ACE scores have all manner of later poor health
outcomes and early death.

That I had high blood pressure, high cholesterol, type 2 diabetes,
lifelong insomnia, and had suffered a stroke by age 39 was no accident.

Iíve had my cortisol tested. My cortisol level at a restful state is at a level that should
suggest, e.g., I am being chased by a bear. :doh:

I isolate myself and control my sensory inputs so I have a safe,
predictable environment where I will not be overloaded by stimuli.

Thatís a life, but thatís not living.

Stress-relieving techniques really do work, but you canít use a broken
system to fix a broken system.

Give me some ******* lorazepam already.

This part of being alive drains so much potential out of everything.

It takes a lot of energy to be hypervigilant. Always on guard, always on watch.

To never know, on a body level, what it means to relax. :faint:

Stress. I canít escape it. It is literally a part of my being, stuck in the
ďonĒ position.

I donít mean to sound morbid or melodramatic, but knowing I can eat
a shotgun and make this hell stop if I really need to is comforting to me.


Whatever,
Ian

Yesss

Fuzzy12
03-27-16, 07:01 PM
I can really recommend 'why zebras don't get ulcers' by Robert sapolsky on how stress affects the body.

(Apologies haven't watched the video. Hopefully tomorrow but couldn't resist the chance to plug a book by my favourite human being in the world).

Unmanagable
03-27-16, 07:58 PM
Nice, Fuzzy. I look forward to diving in a bit deeper. I remember seeing him before, but can't remember the context. I just watched this one of his, specifically, to see what his thoughts are like. Diggin' it:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bEcdGK4DQSg

Unmanagable
03-28-16, 08:27 AM
Just found this regarding meditation and thought it was appropriate and a helpful addition for this thread:

"Though you can start meditation any time, it’s harder if your life is chaotic, if you’re feeling paranoid, if you’re overwhelmed with responsibilities, or if you’re sick.

But even starting under these conditions, meditation will help you to clear things up a bit. Slowly you reorganize your life to support your spiritual journey.

At each stage there will be something you can do to create a supportive space. It may mean changing your diet, who you’re with, how you spend your time, what’s on your walls, what books you read, what you fill your consciousness with, how you care for your body, or where and how you sit to meditate.

All these factors contribute to the depth and freedom that you can know through meditation.

You are under no pressure to rush these changes. You need not fear that because of meditation you are going to lose control and get swept away by a new way of life.

As you gradually develop a quiet and clear awareness, your living habits will naturally come into harmony with your total environment, with your past involvements, present interests, and future concerns.

There need be no sudden ending of relationships in order to prove your holiness. Such frantic changes only show your own lack of faith. When you are one in truth, in the flow, the changes in your life will come naturally." ~Ram Dass