View Full Version : Ketogenic Diet


NateDEEzy
04-07-16, 11:48 PM
I always listen to Joe Rogan's podcast at work and I think he's a bit Add, possibly PI. Anyways, recently he's been talking about this ketogenic diet he's been on for about a month or so and how he's noticed a big gain in mental clarity. Anyone on here tried this diet?

TheGreatKing
04-08-16, 01:27 AM
I don't know about it. How much research have you done on it?
here is links
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ketogenic_diet

and here are the side effects of such a diet:
Although the adverse effects related to the ketogenic diet are generally less serve than those of anticonvulsant medications used to treat epilepsy, individuals following the diet may experience a number of undesirable effects.

Short-Term Side Effects
There are several short-term side effects that are most evident at the beginning of therapy, particularly when patients commence the diet with an initial fast.

Hypoglycemia is a common side effect in this instance, and noticeable signs may include:

Excessive thirst
Frequent urination
Fatigue
Hunger
Confusion, anxiety and/or irritability
Tachycardia
Lightheadedness and shakiness
Sweating and chills
Additionally, patients may also experience some constipation and low-grade acidosis. These effects tend to improve when the diet is continued, as the body adapts to the new diet and adjust the ways in which it sources energy.

Alteration in Blood Composition
As a result of the changes in dietary consumption and the body’s adaptive mechanisms to cope with the reduced carbohydrate intake, there are several changes in the blood composition of individuals following the ketogenic diet.

In particular, the levels of lipids and cholesterol in the blood are commonly higher than what is considered to be normal. More than 60% of patients have raised lipid levels and more than 30% have high levels of cholesterol.

If these changes are profound and there is some concern about the health of the child, slight changes to the diet can be made for the individual patient. For example, saturated fat sources can be substituted for polyunsaturated fats. In some cases, it may be necessary to lower the ketogenic ratio and reduce the proportion of fat to carbohydrate and protein in the diet.

Long-Term Effects
When the ketogenic diet is continued for extended periods of time, there are other adverse effects that become more evident and have a greater impact on individuals.

Kidney stones, also known as nephrolithiasis, are a common complication for children following the diet, with approximately 5% of patients suffering from the condition. It is, however, treatable and the current recommendations suggest that the diet should be continued. The formation of kidney stones is believed to be linked to hypocitraturia and hypercalciuria, when acidosis causes the bone to demineralize. Additionally, low pH in the urine can encourage the formation of crystals and, eventually, kidney stones.

There is some evidence that supplementation with potassium citrate reduces the incidence of kidney stones, as it binds to and reduces the level of calcium in the bloodstream. More research on this is required, however.

Children following the ketogenic diet may be affected by stunted growth, due to reduced levels of insulin-like growth factor 1. This hormone usually plays an important role in the growth of children and is reduced as a result of the diet. For this reason, patients have an increased risk of stunted growth.

Additionally, patients have an increased risk of bone fractures. This arises from the altered levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 and the effects of acidosis. Acidosis leads to the erosion of bone, weakening the bones and leaving them prone to fractures.

In order to manage these side effects, supplementation of vitamins and minerals are routinely administered to patients following the ketogenic diet. This commonly comprises of a multivitamin, calcium and vitamin D supplements.

Side Effects in Adults
For adults following the ketogenic diet, the most common complications include weight loss, constipation and increased levels of cholesterol and triglycerides. Women may also experience amenorrhea or other disruptions to the menstrual cycle.

SB_UK
04-08-16, 02:40 AM
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17011713
Low-carb diets, fasting and euphoria: Is there a link between ketosis (beta-hydroxybutyrate) and gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB)?

The beauty of chemistry can be seen in the almost imperceptible difference between BHB and GHB, between the 2 markedly different bio-effects of racemers in adderall, in the completely different effects of glutamate and GABA in the brain despite variants of one another.

The story nearly making sense.

I won't be able to make it make sense until I can work out how 2 human mental signatures can 'combine' (bond) at a certain frequency (theta frequency) of operation.

Long story - but the entire model of bhb dominance (see the well documented but 1 man tale of 'Jimmy Moore's livin la vida low carb' experiment where he takes bllod glucose and blood ketone readings (you can get skin prick devices which do this - but I'm after the next generation 'smart' contact lens (nobody's had this idea yet - but somebody will - with 11% of the planet now with T2D) which'll give real-time feedback on human metabolism).

If you read through his blog you'll see that there're occasions when he's placed under distress where he loses ketosis.

That's the problem.

The entire model of medicine is incorrect.

We're not tasked with correcting pathophysiology and so can eliminate almost every pharmaceutical company, almost every medical researcher -

- and can replace them with intelligence plus that device above (as we need real-time proof) - plus a series of life-events which're monitored and thanks to the wonderful google - we'll be able to obtain real-time feed-back on blood pressure (I've tested the wearable monitors - they're OK), heart-rate (wonderfully accurate when worn with a belt) maybe not so in the latest smart watch range, blood glucose, ketone body levels, skin temperature, potentially also EEG frequencies (via a hat) -

- all done (bar the ketone body smart contact lens).

Not real-time but

Then all we need do - is place these devices onto people and real-time monitor. I might also like exhaled gas composition under exercise, monitoring heart rate reactivity/recovery rates under fixed exercise programs, and *definitely* some automated method (a suit - not yet produced) to asssist in flexibility training - which is emerging as a major marker in human longevity.
eg
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2858804/Can-exercise-test-predict-DEATH-People-struggle-sitting-rising-test-five-times-likely-die.html

-*-

I think that we can work out nearly everything we need to know just by living life - but there's a core problem which humans suffer in that the stimulation which is offered by stress supplies one of 2 opposing mechanisms of obtaining reward.

-*-

Summarising
[1] Distress will knock you out of ketosis.
[2] The pursuit of distress (ie killing oneself) is the favoured (in our current society) method of obtaining reward
[3] I know how to reverse this
[4] Potentially through reversing this - the individual will be driven towards behaviours which activate the reward system which do not cause distress
[5] However - the tech route above should be used to validate (experimental evidence is always nice) health benefits in certain (those other) pursuits

HAVE TO GO

... [6] To be continued ... ...

SB_UK
04-08-16, 02:01 PM
Important switch here

- continued on science forum
http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?p=1800963#post1800963

Complex II mitochondria - blocked - oxaloacetate (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxaloacetic_acid)

Complex II mitochondria - activated - beta-hydroxybutyrate (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12975474)

willow129
04-09-16, 11:06 AM
I think that my best friend is doing this diet, and he says his diet does make him feel better but honestly as someone who has known him very well for MANY years, I do not see a drop in ADHD symptoms [and I think it could be dangerously misleading for a person to think that's happening if it's not actually!!! I mean, the thing is, ADHDers are known to be poor self observers on top of everything else...]

Just my 2 cents. :)

Strutsen
04-10-16, 04:32 AM
I've tried all diets and its no difference at all in the long-term.

weareacc
04-15-16, 03:25 PM
It's a useful diet in so far as low carb is generally advised for ADHD anyway - this is just a more extreme carb restriction (or else it won't work), with higher fat taking the place of increased protein (which is the difficult part to consistently achieve).
I can recommend it's structure as an alternative to impulse buying huge amounts of sugary stuff and the highs and lows associated with that (he says, with 10 empty wrappers sat next to him).

Unmanagable
04-15-16, 04:05 PM
That's one of the few diets I hadn't tried prior to my drastic nutritional intake changes.

Strict plant-based eating and learning about mucus forming foods, proper food combining, and rational fasting has totally flipped my entire functioning script, internally and externally.

I've gained vitality that I had been told, diagnosed, and convinced I'd never see again. Lost a whole person's worth of weight in the process, too.

Life is no where near perfect and I still struggle like a mofo in some areas, but it's a lot less complicated to navigate those struggles from this newfound level of health that I had been otherwise educated to believe would likely be more harmful than healing.

Eliminating meat, seafood, dairy, eggs, caffeine, alcohol, most grains, fast foods, and all of the ultra-processed stuff, and sticking it to it for just a little over a year now, has convinced me it's worth while to keep unlearning, as it's clearly proven to be the key to my overall wellness.

Every synthetically-filled and violently-killed meal and beverage moment that it took to get my innards gunked up enough to send me to the ER, which prompted the drastic changes, are ones I vow to never live again, as long as I remain able to choose.

NateDEEzy
04-17-16, 09:07 PM
That's one of the few diets I hadn't tried prior to my drastic nutritional intake changes.

Strict plant-based eating and learning about mucus forming foods, proper food combining, and rational fasting has totally flipped my entire functioning script, internally and externally.

I've gained vitality that I had been told, diagnosed, and convinced I'd never see again. Lost a whole person's worth of weight in the process, too.

Life is no where near perfect and I still struggle like a mofo in some areas, but it's a lot less complicated to navigate those struggles from this newfound level of health that I had been otherwise educated to believe would likely be more harmful than healing.

Eliminating meat, seafood, dairy, eggs, caffeine, alcohol, most grains, fast foods, and all of the ultra-processed stuff, and sticking it to it for just a little over a year now, has convinced me it's worth while to keep unlearning, as it's clearly proven to be the key to my overall wellness.

Every synthetically-filled and violently-killed meal and beverage moment that it took to get my innards gunked up enough to send me to the ER, which prompted the drastic changes, are ones I vow to never live again, as long as I remain able to choose.

This might seem like a silly question but did you notice any oddities in your bowel movements, from all the stuff that was stuck in your guts coming out? Also, where do you get your protein from if you don't eat meats or fish?

Unmanagable
04-17-16, 09:38 PM
Not a silly question at all. Yes I did notice. Lots of thick black rubbery-like substance has been, and still is, occasionally released.

There's been much more of the loose orange-ish like release than I'd like to remember. Those tend to be the most painful and drawn out, as well as the most unpleasantly aromatic. And that kind is easily triggered by poor food combining.

I also did a gall bladder flush in the beginning of my plant-based transition and released what appeared to be multiple stones and liver flukes. It freaked me out, initially.

I celebrate like a mofo on the mornings when things are eliminated as one solid release that is sort of snake-like. And I'm forever thanking my body for that healthy release, because I painfully remember the days of being repeatedly told I had IBS and a nervous stomach.

Protein can be found in MANY sources other than meats and fish. The protein theory, as with many other theories, aren't all that accurate, it seems, at least from my direct experience. Here's a list I found to be incredibly helpful in trying to sort it all out:

http://yumuniverse.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/YumUniverse_Plant_Protein_Chart.pdf

KarmanMonkey
04-21-16, 01:51 PM
All I can suggest is healthy skepticism. Every credible source I've read discourages ketogenic diets except in specific circumstances, and even then only recommends them in the short term.

Nothing is all good or all bad, except for the vast amount of misinformation to be found on the net. Do your homework.

dvdnvwls
04-22-16, 08:59 AM
I also did a gall bladder flush in the beginning of my plant-based transition and released what appeared to be multiple stones and liver flukes. It freaked me out, initially.

Gallstones are not released by "gall bladder flushes". It's easy to tell if you analyze the output; those lumps are simply undigested oil, and the gallstones are completely unaffected. The people who convinced you to do this "flush" are quacks, plain and simple.

Unmanagable
04-22-16, 09:38 AM
Gallstones are not released by "gall bladder flushes". It's easy to tell if you analyze the output; those lumps are simply undigested oil, and the gallstones are completely unaffected. The people who convinced you to do this "flush" are quacks, plain and simple.

You are incorrect, plain and simple, as far as my direct experience goes, and that of many others. I'll gladly invite you to analyze the output next time I do it so you can see for yourself. Until you've lived or experienced it directly, I'd appreciate it if you would stop trying to discredit the personal experiences I share that I've found great success with as far as my individual health goes.

You appear to have quite an axe to grind for whatever reason. I can respect that, most especially if you've personally tried it and had a bad experience. Otherwise, I view your responses as a repeated attempt to persuade folks to ONLY follow the widely accepted and heavily funded scripts that may or may not be contributing to keeping them stuck in a loop of illness. I personally want better things for our society than what has been typically offered up in my pursuits of wellness, therefore I learned the benefits of readily thinking outside of the proverbial box.

I've listened to all the data that is most often shared and heavily funded for most of my life, only to witness and experience my health continually and rapidly decline, along with that of many loved ones who also strictly follow doctor's orders, only to become stuck in vicious cycles of hellish sick care with no end in sight.

All the things you refer to as quackery are the very things that helped me find and regain my health on a level I never thought was possible. Unfortunately, many closed minds, and those who are so easily and heavily influenced by them, will never find relief in any of the places they've been taught to fear or view as subpar.

KarmanMonkey
04-22-16, 02:17 PM
I work in an environment where I sometimes see people's quality of life get worse as a result of "treatment". The unit where I work is for people who the system has failed; people with multiple hospital admissions, often overmedicated and undersupported; people with destructive families or a lifetime of marginalization.

The medical system needs to follow an evidence based approach, but there's also the point at which professionals need to take a step back and re-evaluate their assumptions.

What one person refers to as "quackery" is a saving grace for another. I know someone who for years was treated for a mental health issue to no effect, only to discover that they had been exposed to a nasty toxin because of the home they lived in. Once the toxin was flushed it was like the "mental illness" never happened.

In the end, anything that works for the person is okay by me; I just am bothered when anyone takes their experience and broadcasts it as the approach EVERYONE should use.

I dislike broad statements (including this one) that assume that science or experience is infallible. I know many people personally who have been "transformed" by alternative treatment. The thing is, my own experience has been that about 2/3 of those transformations either are for the worse, or come at a great cost to a different aspect of the person's health.

I get quite concerned when people state as fact things that are either anecdotal or from a non-credible source. I don't dismiss a person's experience, and I'm thrilled for that 1/3 of the transformations that have been truly positive. I just also don't want people to assume that their experience will be shared by anyone that takes their approach.

In my job I rarely tell people what to do. I try and keep my focus on sharing what worked for me and why, and letting the person take or leave what they will. I'll also connect them to resources, research, and I run a group that has content that's about 3/4 developed by former clients in the place where I work. Always, though, my emphasis is on self-determination and self-discovery, coupled with a healthy level of scepticism.

I often hate the media for their habit of presenting a new study as fact, often convincing large populations that one thing is responsible for all their ills. In the '70s it was carbs, in the '90s it was cholesterol, and now it's gluten. The sad thing is that there are many people who adopt a gluten free diet because they heard something about it on TV, and meanwhile the study the TV was talking about only applied to 1% of the population. Don't get me wrong; I don't see much harm in going gluten free (except maybe to your checkbook) I just would rather people not believe everything they see on the internet or on TV.

I'm not saying to exclude the possibility that a change in nutrition would have a dramatic impact on your life; I've seen it do amazing things for people! I simply feel that we need to go into such choices with our eyes open, and to be mindful of any potential risks.

Cyllya
04-27-16, 05:10 AM
Anyways, recently he's been talking about this ketogenic diet he's been on for about a month or so and how he's noticed a big gain in mental clarity.

What kind of diet was he on before that? If he was previously on the Standard American Diet, I'm not surprised he had cognitive benefits, but you probably don't have to go on the actual ketogenic diet to get those benefits.

From stuff I've read, I get the impression that the best diet for most people would be something like this...

DON'T EAT:
Anything your mom would consider junk food (candy, soda, ice cream, cake, potato chips, etc)
Highly processed foods, especially processed meats like sausage and bacon
Most grains (including wheat, corn, bread, pasta, crackers, oats, granola)
Diary
Fruit juice
Synthetic colors


EAT:
Vegetables, especially leafy ones
Fruit
Nuts
Seeds
Meat (red meat, poultry, and seafood) and eggs should be okay health-wise; ethics are another matter
Use caution with dried foods (dried fruits are high in sugar relative to volume; dried meats are high in salt)
Honey and coconut sugar are okay in limited quantities
Hydration mainly from water


MAYBE EAT?:
Legumes (beans, lentils, peanuts, soy)


Depending on exactly what proportion you had the allowed foods in, the above would probably have a heck of a lot of carbohydrates while still having a lower amount of carbs than the standard diet and therefore being considered a "low carb" diet.

The downsides are:

(a) If you normally eat a standard high-grain carb-heavy diet and then switch to the above, you'll probably feel like crap for at least a week. (You shouldn't get actual hypoglycemia though, unless maybe you accidentally consume too few calories, which is quite possible.)

(b) It's a pain in the butt. Almost all the available foods are perishable, anything you might get from a restaurant will usually have the non-allowed foods mixed in, and you'll probably need to eat at least three square meals per day plus snacks.

(c) All the tasty stuff is off limits. :(:(:(

So it's pretty hard to eat this way if you have executive dysfunction, low income, sensory issues, and/or issues with emotional eating. It seems like it'd be worth it to try this sort of thing if you could, but I know I get really, really stressed out when I restrict my diet much at all.

When I lived by myself, I had to forbid myself from buying perishable foods, because they always went bad before I could eat them. Nowadays, I have a roommate who is on the paleo diet (similar to the above), and sometimes it feels like he's constantly hungry. He's not actually constantly hungry. It just feels that way to me because he's always offering to cook dinner, or asking me when I'm making dinner, or what will be for dinner, or did we buy anything from the store to make dinner with, etc, while I'm not hungry because I just had a plate of microwaveable chicken nuggets and a liter of diet coke and I am busy trying to engage in other non-food activities thankyouverymuch.

Plus if your ADHD meds suppress your appetite, you might have trouble making yourself eat adequate amounts of the allowed foods, since there tends to be a lower calorie-per-volume level compared to junk food.

SB_UK
04-27-16, 07:45 AM
Inserted


EAT:
Vegetables, especially leafy ones
Advice I've seen
Pesticides what does the organic label actually mean ?
Fruit
Advice I've seen
Fruits comes in different GI's - the higher the worse - controversy over whether any level of fructose is healthy
Nuts
Advice I've seen
Tree not Ground
Soak them to release lectins
Seeds
Advice I've seen
Soak them to release lectins
Meat (red meat, poultry, and seafood) and eggs should be okay health-wise; ethics are another matter
Advice I've seen
Don't touch any animal product under any circumstance
Use caution with dried foods (dried fruits are high in sugar relative to volume; dried meats are high in salt)
Same idea as 'fruit' above
Advice I've seen
These should be in the 'do not eat' category.
Honey and coconut sugar are okay in limited quantities
Advice I've seen
These should be in the 'do not eat' category.
Maybe a small amount of coconut water
Hydration mainly from water
Advice I've seen
Lots of stuff on optimal pH, mineral levels, non-fluoridated



All of the above have some underlying sense.

I'm operating under occasional whole lemons (organic), fermented cabbage, green leaf (not yet organic), cold-pressed EVOO, tree nuts [appropriately treated but not yet organic], stevia, low GI vegetables [not gone organic with these yet just frozen for ease].
- nearly forgot - pure (to 100%) dark chocolate's on my list also - btw - I use 'pain' as my marker for a 'bad' food. Earl Grey tea hit the off limits foods yesterday !

I can be convinced to eliminate chocolate and switch to organic veggies/nuts/seeds. Organic has a major price markup though and organic frozen veggie choice is limited.

The take-home here - isn't that we need a very specific diet - it's that we do best on a simple natural diet.

The benefit - cooking times are pretty much zero.

-*-

The other theories I think could be severe (1/4 recommended) caloric restriction on an eat what you like basis - obviously the list above would be optimal though.

And fasting periods - up to 4 days.
Followed by eating from the list above.

The take-home here from this second half is that we just plain eat too much.

So - the problem of what to eat is difficult as 'what we eat' vs 'quantity of what we eat' alters the balance.

Haven't worked out the balance between food restriction and food variety ie the less one eats - the more (%-wise) of the dangerous foods you can eat ?

But I don't think that you'll be attracted to 'danger' foods on Intermittent fasting and caloric restriction -
both of which're ketogenic-compatible.

Apparently ketogenic diets previously began with a 2 day fast -

- nearly forgot - have managed to get MCT oil to work - but only at VERY low doses.

It's not natural though - and isn't required.

-*-

Bit complicated all of the above - the point I'm trying to make is that a healthy ketogenic diet is possible but is hard work; your relationship with food (my experience) changes - and it becomes 'aversive' ie you don't really want to eat.

SB_UK
04-27-16, 08:07 AM
[QUOTE=Cyllya;1805846]
Depending on exactly what proportion you had the allowed foods in, the above would probably have a heck of a lot of carbohydrates while still having a lower amount of carbs than the standard diet and therefore being considered a "low carb" diet.
ADDED - ketogenic often comes in at <20g - that's really low ie 1 slice bread per day - however I'm banking on there being a GI factor ie unlimited carbs (excluding fibre) as long as zero GI eg leaves <- could be wrong - simple expt to test and physical activity partic intensity will complicate things ... ... see Peter Attia on internet
The downsides are:

(a) If you normally eat a standard high-grain carb-heavy diet and then switch to the above, you'll probably feel like crap for at least a week. (You shouldn't get actual hypoglycemia though, unless maybe you accidentally consume too few calories, which is quite possible.)
ADDED - called the 'low-carb flu' I think - not sure what I think about this name. Transition off carbs isn't easy.

(b) It's a pain in the butt. Almost all the available foods are perishable, anything you might get from a restaurant will usually have the non-allowed foods mixed in, and you'll probably need to eat at least three square meals per day plus snacks.
ADDED - EXACTLY - masses of perishable foods which need cutting with arthritic hands - restaurants off limits - sometimes just take 2 spoons of EVOO with 1 drop of balsamic vinegar for palatability

(c) All the tasty stuff is off limits. :(:(:(
ADDED - there's a reason for that !!! Programmed to locate the foods which save us in a food scarce environment - but kill us in a Walmart 'rich' environment.

So it's pretty hard to eat this way if you have executive dysfunction, low income, sensory issues, and/or issues with emotional eating. It seems like it'd be worth it to try this sort of thing if you could, but I know I get really, really stressed out when I restrict my diet much at all.
ADDED - You will feel extreme pain on fasting, caloric restriction and restricted raw vegan simultaneously - BUT IT GETS EASIER.

When I lived by myself, I had to forbid myself from buying perishable foods, because they always went bad before I could eat them. Nowadays, I have a roommate who is on the paleo diet (similar to the above), and sometimes it feels like he's constantly hungry. He's not actually constantly hungry. It just feels that way to me because he's always offering to cook dinner, or asking me when I'm making dinner, or what will be for dinner, or did we buy anything from the store to make dinner with, etc, while I'm not hungry because I just had a plate of microwaveable chicken nuggets and a liter of diet coke and I am busy trying to engage in other non-food activities thankyouverymuch.
ADDED - experience the pain of cooking for your family during an extended fast BUT IT GETS EASIER. - [/COLOR]

Plus if your ADHD meds suppress your appetite, you might have trouble making yourself eat adequate amounts of the allowed foods, since there tends to be a lower calorie-per-volume level compared to junk food./QUOTE]
ADDED - This is an interesting subject - several years back I brought up the peculiar (not so peculiar) observation that my (all of our) dexedrine (though most of the rest of the world permits adderall so this is an easier observation for the UKked to make.) schedule was spaced at the exact same periodicity as eating ie 4 hrs separated 8am, 12pm, 5pm

SB_UK
04-27-16, 08:14 AM
'A tiny bit of what you fancy does you good'

might actually be true - but we're best seated before we're told portion sizes.

SB_UK
04-27-16, 08:21 AM
and released what appeared to be multiple stones ... It freaked me out, initially.



Yes. Definitely.

SB_UK
04-27-16, 08:48 AM
http://yumuniverse.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/YumUniverse_Plant_Protein_Chart.pdf


excellent list didn't explicitly mention

berries (lowest GI fruit) [go for colour variety/intensity in fruit/veg],
* rocket (arugula) [always organic - use as snack],
asparagus,
avocado [hard to buy ready to eat],
* brussels <- can be cooked by just microwaving
macadamia [too expensive],
flax (posted today on laxative effects),
hemp [bought powder - apparently hard to 'de-hull'],
* almonds

* go to foods but care with almond portion size

SB_UK
04-27-16, 09:22 AM
sorry - post should read

excellent list I didn't explicitly mention (ie specifics instead of just fruit,veg,nuts)

berries (lowest GI fruit) [go for colour variety/intensity in fruit/veg],
* rocket (arugula) [always organic - use as snack],
asparagus - expense vs 2 min cook time - tough one !
avocado [hard to buy ready to eat],
* brussels <- can be cooked by just microwaving
macadamia [too expensive],
flax (posted today on laxative effects),
hemp [bought powder - apparently hard to 'de-hull'],
* almonds

* go to foods but care with almond portion size

SB_UK
04-28-16, 10:03 PM
Advice I've seen
Fruits comes in different GI's - the higher the worse - controversy over whether any level of fructose is healthyToday's newspaper

Researchers at the University of California in Los Angeles found that fructose - a type of sugar naturally found in fruits and vegetables, but also present in soft drinks and sweets - damages brain cells and can lead to a wide range of diseases, from diabetes and heart disease to Alzheimer's and ADH.http://www.telegraph.co.uk/food-and-drink/news/sugar-can-cause-brain-damage-claim-scientists-but-salmon-reverse/

Oily fish absorb organic carciogens (which we create).

The answer is to pull fructose intake back to a basal minimum.
zero ?

Nuts, seeds (pumpkin+sunflower), veggies to the rescue as long as human omega-6 levels are brought right down; which'll happen on the diet outlined above.

Salivating at the thought of one's own premature, painful death ?

http://static.srcdn.com/slir/w459-h344-q90-c459:344/wp-content/uploads/Hansel-and-Gretel-fairytale.jpg