View Full Version : Has anyone tried Brain Balance?


ADHDWife&Mom
04-09-16, 04:51 PM
Hello,
I am new here. My husband has ADHD and found that meds did not work for him as a child so he learned (and still struggles with) ways to succeed without meds. We have a 10 year old son who we have always considered might have ADHD but this year is the first it has caused him problems in school. We are trying to use some of his dad's techniques to help him but he hasnt had a lifetime to get used to it so its difficult on him. My husband insists we try a non-medicine approach with our son FIRST and if that doesnt work we'll consider meds.

We have a Brain Balance achievement center nearby and I am considering taking him there for some help. I would love to hear some first hand experiences with them if anyone has tried. Their website says they have a "drug-free approach" which is what we are looking for but it doesnt give much other info (of course they cant give away too much since they want you to pay for their services).

If anyone has any other drug-free options, Id love some info. Im just starting to explore this forum so any pointers on where to find this info would greatly appreciated.

dvdnvwls
04-09-16, 05:39 PM
If it doesn't give much other info, it's safe to assume they are a shady operation. Sorry, but that's just the truth.

I'm concerned that your husband is bent on withholding the one thing that is proven to work in most cases. Why eliminate the best available possibility and decide to scrounge for leftovers instead?

It would be right to try "drug-free approaches" first, if they worked. In general, unfortunately, they just don't.

The essential problem is that the things we ADHDers need to learn to do are nearly impossible to do without the support of medication. Medication, in other words, is usually the necessary first step in order to have a hope of accomplishing any of the other things (such as developing useful habits and learning coping techniques) that are going to be needed.

The aversion to ADHD medications is based on misinformation and fear-mongering. There are no reliable facts to support the desire to avoid these medications, and massive long-term evidence of their safety and effectiveness.

peripatetic
04-09-16, 05:52 PM
Greetings and welcome to the forums!

There are parents here who use non medication alternatives successfully and I hope some of them reply. There are also parents who tried different behavior modifications, therapies, schedules, and dietary/activity changes and found they didn't help enough but are useful in combination with prescription medications. This section of parenting has tons of threads on treatment options, but you might want to use the search function instead of slogging through page after page.

In the meantime, as for resources on this forum, I strongly suggest dizfriz's corner as a starting point: http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=60130

dvdnvwls
04-09-16, 05:55 PM
Greetings and welcome to the forums!

There are parents here who use non medication alternatives successfully and I hope some of them reply. There are also parents who tried different behavior modifications, therapies, schedules, and dietary/activity changes and found they didn't help enough but are useful in combination with prescription medications.
It also depends very much on what your definition of "success" is. Sometimes parents can have conflicting definitions of that and it can be the cause of misunderstandings.

This section of parenting has tons of threads on treatment options, but you might want to use the search function instead of slogging through page after page.

In the meantime, as for resources on this forum, I strongly suggest dizfriz's corner as a starting point: http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=60130

Yes, absolutely.

TheGreatKing
04-09-16, 09:23 PM
Welcome to the community.
I hope some one here gives you some insight on what you are seeking.

sarahsweets
04-10-16, 05:40 AM
So...if meds didnt work for your husband as a child-then they will automatically not work for your son?
(btw I wonder if this is some sort of covert plug )

ADHDWife&Mom
04-10-16, 03:13 PM
If it doesn't give much other info, it's safe to assume they are a shady operation. Sorry, but that's just the truth.

I'm concerned that your husband is bent on withholding the one thing that is proven to work in most cases. Why eliminate the best available possibility and decide to scrounge for leftovers instead?

It would be right to try "drug-free approaches" first, if they worked. In general, unfortunately, they just don't.

The essential problem is that the things we ADHDers need to learn to do are nearly impossible to do without the support of medication. Medication, in other words, is usually the necessary first step in order to have a hope of accomplishing any of the other things (such as developing useful habits and learning coping techniques) that are going to be needed.

The aversion to ADHD medications is based on misinformation and fear-mongering. There are no reliable facts to support the desire to avoid these medications, and massive long-term evidence of their safety and effectiveness.

Thank you for your suggestions. My husband isnt completely against drugs, just that he hasnt used them since he was a child and they didnt work well for him so he would prefer we try drug free approaches first to see if they work. He had to work pretty hard to learn techniques for himself. Sometimes it seems like he forgets how hard it was for him when he was a kid though. He has spent a lifetime training himself to do what he needs to do and he seems to expect our 10yr old to just do what he does and it will work too. Ive found that ADHD people often have trouble with empathy though. Right now we are really just trying to figure out our first steps for our son. My husband thinks the meds will make it so he will not bother with the techniques, Im wondering if what you stated would work better, the meds would help to allow him to develop the techniques. It seems like trying to implement these steps is very difficult for him at the moment. We havent had a formal diagnosis yet so we dont have the option for meds at the moment but we are working on that and will discuss meds with the doctor at that time. Thank you for your insight.

Greetings and welcome to the forums!

There are parents here who use non medication alternatives successfully and I hope some of them reply. There are also parents who tried different behavior modifications, therapies, schedules, and dietary/activity changes and found they didn't help enough but are useful in combination with prescription medications. This section of parenting has tons of threads on treatment options, but you might want to use the search function instead of slogging through page after page.

In the meantime, as for resources on this forum, I strongly suggest dizfriz's corner as a starting point: http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=60130

Thank you, I have been doing a lot of reading (both books and online) and have seen so many different options that its hard to decide what might work best. Some things say that there are all of these options and then others say drugs are best. Im thinking combination would work best in many cases so Im open to that, im just looking into drug free first. Thank you for your suggestions and pointing me in the right direction here.

So...if meds didnt work for your husband as a child-then they will automatically not work for your son?
(btw I wonder if this is some sort of covert plug )

First, this isnt a covert plug at all. I have no connection to this business and havent even contacted them yet. I just was hoping maybe someone here might have tried them. Everything like this is so expensive that I worry about if its something I will pay a ton of money trying only to find that its not really credible at all.
As for my husband thinking it wont work for our son because it didnt work for him.... that isnt really the case. I should have explained better. He hasnt used them in over 25years and he has been able to be successful. He had to struggle for it though and still does. He actually has thought about trying some of the newer meds for himself but hasnt yet. He is worried that it might mess him up because he has spent so much time training himself to do what he needs to do, he thinks that if he goes on meds it might make him stop trying and he might be stuck on the meds forever. I cant say that I totally understand because I do not have ADHD. My husband has dealt with this his entire life so I was letting him take the lead with this particular situation with our son. We will definable be weighting all of the options, but I think I would prefer to not have our child used medication if its possible for him not to. At the same time, I dont want him to have to struggle every single day of his life to do what most people can do without worry. I hope that clears things up.

dvdnvwls
04-10-16, 08:08 PM
Your husband is (as far as treating your son's ADHD is concerned) living in a fantasy-land. I do understand his aim - I see "where he's coming from" - but this particular aim is so head-in-the-clouds idealistic that there's little to no hope of it working.

ginniebean
04-10-16, 10:26 PM
Thank you for your suggestions. My husband isnt completely against drugs, just that he hasnt used them since he was a child and they didnt work well for him so he would prefer we try drug free approaches first to see if they work. He had to work pretty hard to learn techniques for himself. Sometimes it seems like he forgets how hard it was for him when he was a kid though. He has spent a lifetime training himself to do what he needs to do and he seems to expect our 10yr old to just do what he does and it will work too. Ive found that ADHD people often have trouble with empathy though. Right now we are really just trying to figure out our first steps for our son. My husband thinks the meds will make it so he will not bother with the techniques, Im wondering if what you stated would work better, the meds would help to allow him to develop the techniques. It seems like trying to implement these steps is very difficult for him at the moment. We havent had a formal diagnosis yet so we dont have the option for meds at the moment but we are working on that and will discuss meds with the doctor at that time. Thank you for your insight.

I have in the past been quite negative to alternatives for a number of reasons. The number 1 reason is that parents pour millions into these alternatives only to later have them completely debunked by science.

The second reason is that parents are routinely are made to feel like bad parents for using medication meanwhile the kid flounders. (this can have long term consequences.

I have other reasons but I suppose those are the best ones.

Having said all this. Research is coming to light that behaviour modification can help improve adhd performance by about 30 %. For some medicarion is a life changer, people can feel that it was as if they were blind but now they can see. Others don't get quite that amount of effextivemess, some get as little as 30%.

But what research is showing that a combined approach if behaviour modification and medication is the most effective across the board.

Also, the single most important factor in a child having a good outcome and success in life is supportive surroundings. Not just while they are young and cute but when they are teens ans young adults. Children with adhd mature slower than their peers and while they may appear like their peers their competence to fly solo just isn't fully there until mid to late twenties. You might want to wring their atubborn defiant necks when they are teens but they still need you a lot.
Hope that helps. Sorry I know nothing about brain training


I think it's wonderful that you are supportive in your husband taking the lead in his own condition. So many partners are preasured into medication and that can bring with it a whole host of problems. It is important to be aware that things can change. Your husband is likely working twice as hard as anyone else for his success. Stressors can and often do kick us in the back of the knees and the strategies we have been uaing don't work as well. There is such a variety of medications available and if there are times in his life his struggle becomes too great being there to reassure him that help is available. Medication doesn't take away skills, motivation or anything elae. What they have been shown to do is make using those skills and strategies much morr effective.

Good luck and do keep checking this place out there is a wealth of information on here.

CrazyLazyGal
04-18-16, 12:59 AM
In addition to your husband being a different person than your son (duh), there are a lot of medications that weren't around when your husband was a kid. The medication I take didn't exist even ten years ago.

Keep in mind that trying medication isn't a commitment, only a trial.

In addition, there is evidence that the brains of kids who are medicated grow to become more similar to non ADHD brains. Not every kid, but a good fraction of them. I've posted links to the findings previously. None of the studies were done by drug companies. They were all done at well known universities.