View Full Version : First Day On Concerta: Sleepiness? Happiness?


ADHDH3LP
04-16-16, 12:04 PM
Hey everyone,

Recently, I am a 15 year old male and was diagnosed with ADHD primarily inattentive. I was prescribed 36 mg of Concerta by my doctor and took it today morning at around 10:55 AM. I took the pill with water and swallowed it.

Immediately (within 15 to 20 seconds) of taking the pill, I felt happier (do not know if this is part of the drug). This continued for 5-7 minutes afterwards. However, my mood continues to feel elevated. I also felt lighter at first but not anymore.

Lastly, and more importantly, I am feeling sleepier after taking the pill, like I am not distracted but I feel sleepier. I did not really feel sleepier before taking the pill and slept a good amount of time last night and at the same time as other nights.

Is this normal when you first take Concerta? I read elsewhere that this sleepiness effect will wear of after 10 days or so but is this supposed to happen?

Thanks!

NOTE: AT THE TIME OF WRITING THIS, 1 HOUR AFTER TAKING THE PILL, I AM STARTING TO FEEL SLIGHTLY LESS SLEEPY

Greyhound1
04-16-16, 12:22 PM
Welcome to the forum!

It usually takes some time for our body's to get adjusted to the medication. It's tough to evaluate effectiveness until you get adjusted.

I hope it works out well and improves your symptoms.

Best of wishes and I hope you enjoy the forum!

Cheers
Hound.

aeon
04-16-16, 01:18 PM
Disregard most everything you experience in the first three days, as most all of it is placebo effect and projection of expectation.


Cheers,
Ian

Simargl
04-16-16, 04:36 PM
I feel like we should get a manual when we're prescribed these meds. The doctor can fill a script but there are so many questions left unanswered- many questions we didn't even know needed to be asked. We're left floundering with varied expectations.

Are we doing this right? Is this how I'm supposed to feel? Am I eating the right things? Drinking enough water? Is how I'm feeling right now normal?

There's good advice above this post. It takes time. That can be a hard thing to accept when all you want to do is improve yourself and the quality of your life.

Concerta made me tired at first and from what I've read on here-- it makes a lot of people tired at first. It's the opposite of what you'd expect from a stimulant. It depends from person to person but the sleepiness will probably wear off. The sleepiness may come back when you need to raise the dosage. I think our bodies are just overwhelmed by the introduction of new chemicals.

aeon
04-16-16, 07:46 PM
I feel like we should get a manual when we're prescribed these meds. The doctor can fill a script but there are so many questions left unanswered-
many questions we didn't even know needed to be asked. We're left floundering with varied expectations.

Are we doing this right? Is this how I'm supposed to feel? Am I eating the right things? Drinking enough water? Is how I'm feeling right now normal?

Agreed, and the info guides that pharmacists are so lax about giving out do a poor job in this regard, even the consumer-oriented ones.

There's good advice above this post. It takes time. That can be a hard thing to accept when all you want to do is improve yourself and the quality of your life.

Especially if and when you are really struggling or in a particularly bad place, and start a med therapy filled with hopes, fears, expectations,
anecdotes of others’ experience (most often not applicable due to variation per each person’s unique response), misinformation, the FUD of
people who care about you, as well as strangers with agendas, and otherwise. That will almost ensure placebo effects of all kinds.

Concerta made me tired at first and from what I've read on here-- it makes a lot of people tired at first. It's the opposite of what you'd expect from a stimulant.
It depends from person to person but the sleepiness will probably wear off. The sleepiness may come back when you need to raise the dosage. I think our bodies
are just overwhelmed by the introduction of new chemicals.

Concerta never made me sleepy, and neither of us are wrong about Concerta.

Which is why if someone asks if Concerta makes you sleepy, the best answer is “it might,” or “for some people it does.”

But the industry does a poor job of communicating that in a way that is easy to understand, and actually gets the relevant information to the patient.

Most people would not define a 1-in-10 occurrence as a common occurrence. But the industry does! If 1-in-10 people get purple spots from a drug,
purple spots becomes a common side-effect.

Most people who read that a given med has purple spots as a common side effect will be afraid of getting purple spots in a way that is not commensurate
with the actual likelihood, or risk.

And that doesn’t help anyone.

Bodies do have responses to drugs, and they are typically very similar, shared, and predictable responses. Science can tell us that, and it has, and it does.

But human subjective experience is where the action is, for good and bad, and that, I think, has more to do with how reports vary from each other,
as well as from what we might reasonably expect given the science of it within the body.

And those experiences are real and valid. But they must be considered in context of how our subjective experience is informed, colored, filtered, distorted, etc.,
and I think some effort is worthwhile in considering what came from the med and what came from the wonder that is the mind.

That’s true of any med, but is particularly so when it comes to meds that affect subjective experience itself, and ADHD meds are certainly that.

So some guidance from the industry, relevant and good, would be most welcome when it comes to meds, especially ADHD meds that offer promise when we
have known so much failure. How could we not pin our hopes and dreams to that, project a part of ourselves onto that, when we are suffering and struggling
to cope?

That’s a psychological dynamic no pill could ever hope to explain or support. We need to remember we bring a lot to the table, and own that, so we don’t make
the pill something it is not, and so we have a greater chance of being helped in our disability.

To the degree the industry could help us with its part in that, I hope it will, and to everyone’s benefit.


Cheers,
Ian

Simargl
04-16-16, 10:24 PM
Agreed, and the info guides that pharmacists are so lax about giving out do a poor job in this regard, even the consumer-oriented ones.

Especially if and when you are really struggling or in a particularly bad place, and start a med therapy filled with hopes, fears, expectations,
anecdotes of others’ experience (most often not applicable due to variation per each person’s unique response), misinformation, the FUD of
people who care about you, as well as strangers with agendas, and otherwise. That will almost ensure placebo effects of all kinds.

Concerta never made me sleepy, and neither of us are wrong about Concerta.

Which is why if someone asks if Concerta makes you sleepy, the best answer is “it might,” or “for some people it does.”

I see your point.

I should have been more broad. It does seem like sleepiness as a result of taking Concerta comes up a lot but I don't know the statistics. I made a point of using 'might' or 'some' in previous posts for that reason. I slipped this time.

I believe my last post came from my own frustrations; I wasn't being as thoughtful as I could have been. I would never want to give someone the wrong impression on a new medication.


Most people would not define a 1-in-10 occurrence as a common occurrence. But the industry does! If 1-in-10 people get purple spots from a drug, purple spots becomes a common side-effect.

Most people who read that a given med has purple spots as a common side effect will be afraid of getting purple spots in a way that is not commensurate with the actual likelihood, or risk.

And that doesn’t help anyone.



It's helpful and it isn't. It's helpful for the 1-in-10 that's getting that side effect. It's validation that they're not making things up-- That what they're experiencing could be a result from the medication they recently started taking.

It's not helpful in the way the information is presented. Common isn't the right category for the 1-in-10. Although, they need to be represented in some way; I personally don't consider 1-in-10 rare.

Although, I suppose that brings it back around to the industry doing a poor job of not providing the information we need in a useful way.


So some guidance from the industry, relevant and good, would be most welcome when it comes to meds, especially ADHD meds that offer promise when we have known so much failure. How could we not pin our hopes and dreams to that, project a part of ourselves onto that, when we are suffering and struggling to cope?

That’s a psychological dynamic no pill could ever hope to explain or support. We need to remember we bring a lot to the table, and own that, so we don’t make the pill something it is not, and so we have a greater chance of being helped in our disability.

To the degree the industry could help us with its part in that, I hope it will, and to everyone’s benefit.

Cheers,
Ian

You sum it up perfectly. Thank you, Ian.

sarahsweets
04-17-16, 12:47 PM
Something that I noticed with concerta and all drugs in the methylphenidate family was the lethargy or sleepiness was very dose dependent. Too low or too high gave me the same side effect.

mariposa29
05-07-16, 07:02 AM
I'm on day 3 of 18mg concerta. Day one I felt calmer and though I seemed to get a bit more done than usual, I didn't feel that motivated. Day 2 I was absolutely zonked out. Horribly tired.....falling asleep on my feet practically late morning and ended up sleeping for most of the afternoon. Today I feel calm and again I'm not conscious of feeling motivated but I am getting a bit more done than usual (nowhere near as much as I'd like but hey ho!).

This is quite intriguing actually.....didn't expect what is happening to me or the variation in the first few days.

DJ Bill
05-07-16, 10:32 AM
Within an hour of my first Ritalin dose I was yawning....but I wasn't sleepy. I still after about 2 months, do yawn a bunch but I don't know if it is the methylphenidate or what all is causing it.

Yeah the first few days turned out to be placebo effect for me.. I was doing really wonderful, I thought. Now, not so much but I can tell when the dose has worn off. (3-5 hrs later)