View Full Version : How long should you be in a job before looking for something else?


midnightstar
04-22-16, 04:20 PM
How long should you be in a job before you look for something else to avoid employers thinking you are "job hopping"?

dvdnvwls
04-22-16, 04:37 PM
It depends on several things; some of those are things I don't know anything about.

If you're in the kind of business where frequent job switching is considered relatively normal, it's less of an issue.

If your current employer is causing you a lot of distress, then it might be best to get out soon, regardless of how it might look.

And so on, with probably many factors that I've missed.

Bouncingoffwall
04-22-16, 04:58 PM
I don't if there's a "right" answer to this.

It doesn't matter what an employer thinks if they end up hiring you, right?

In certain industries, frequent job shifts might be frowned upon. I think this would be true with certain unionized industries, or industries where long-term commitment is highly valued.

"Job hopping" hasn't prevented me from getting jobs. In fact, I say you should always be looking for a better job, unless you have some sort of contractual obligation to your current employer. Getting too secure in a position can be dangerous, as the universe is unpredictable. Taking a job for granted and getting too attached can cause you to miss better opportunities and leave you unprepared for sudden changes.

I can only post my own experience with this: I applied for both the mental health dept and Social Services Agency of a local government entity at the same time. The mental health position was the one I *really* wanted, but I got picked up by Social Services first. I knew how to do the Social Services job, because I had been doing it for several years. However, I wasn't really happy being a Child Welfare worker (long story), but I took the position anyway. My wife was four months pregnant, had obtained a new job several months earlier, and was having to commute 3.5 hours per day to her job. I also needed a change of scenery, because our current apartment was a slum, with roaches, etc. The area was dangerous, and I didn't want to raise a child in that environment. The Social Services job gave us the added justification to pay a few hundred $$ extra to move to the same county as our jobs.

I was okay with the Social Services job, but I still wasn't quite satisfied. I really wanted to work in the Mental Health field instead. After being employed with Social Services for a year and two months, I finally got hired (after three or four interviews) by the Mental Health Agency. The pay was the same, and I had no qualms about leaving.

As a result of my decision, I am far less stressed, and much more satisfied with my work :D

Pilgrim
04-22-16, 05:18 PM
If I completely loose interest, and this isn't hard to do. So I always try to keep it interesting.

A manger that's just not the right cut for me. They have to be supportive and be live that I'm an asset to the organisation.

A toxic workforce. People around me that spend more time gossiping than working.

A feeling that it's time for a change in general. Only if I've got another job to go to, and I have the ability to move to a job I want. I find this one the most difficult of all.

acdc01
04-22-16, 05:45 PM
Have you been job hopping quickly already? If this is your first job or if your past employment history is steady and you just hate your current job, I'd start looking for a new one asap.

One fast job hop isn't going to taint your resume forever if the rest of your resume looks good. People do find a place just isn't a good fit for them so instead of wasting your time and the companies, it's better to just leave asap.

Socaljaxs
04-22-16, 05:48 PM
It will really depend of your career history. Also type of field you are In.

Some career fields such as sales for example, it's common to see high turnover and movement. If you can show your success and accomplishments. It isn't usually a deal breaker...

If you have a career history of longevity but leave a new job relatively quickly. it's usually not an issue. If your history is every few month like 9 months or less at each location. In a career field that is usually steady It would look like you aren't sustainable and move on quickly or if terminated often, it may look bad ext.

Also, if the economy/ unemployment in your area is bad. Companies tend to see that more often.

Just like gaps I'm resume when there is a substantial gap between employment it gets looked at unless you can justify the gap positively

midnightstar
04-22-16, 05:55 PM
First job I was there for just over a year before I left because I got a job with more hours (and it would be too hard to do both jobs), second job I was there for nearly a year I think before then moving away, then I have a large carreer gap because I was helping look after disabled family member (moved away to help family look after him), then went to college then got this current job a few months later. I've been at this job nearly 11 months and when I find something in the company nearer home I'll be going for it.

Just didn't know (assuming if I get something else in the company quickly) whether it would count as "job-hopping"

Socaljaxs
04-22-16, 05:59 PM
First job I was there for just over a year before I left because I got a job with more hours (and it would be too hard to do both jobs), second job I was there for nearly a year I think before then moving away, then I have a large carreer gap because I was helping look after disabled family member (moved away to help family look after him), then went to college then got this current job a few months later. I've been at this job nearly 11 months and when I find something in the company nearer home I'll be going for it.

Just didn't know (assuming if I get something else in the company quickly) whether it would count as "job-hopping"

Something else inside the company isn't considered job hopping. As for moving that's noticeable based on locations of companies.. The caretaker even if not paid could be considered working..if you aren't employed by a company most hr's want to see that you are doing something even if it's volunteering. Or school..

acdc01
04-22-16, 06:15 PM
Something else inside the company isn't considered job hopping. As for moving that's noticeable based on locations of companies.. The caretaker even if not paid could be considered working..if you aren't employed by a company most hr's want to see that you are doing something even if it's volunteering. Or school..

Agree. I'd switch positions asap. It actually looks good to switch jobs within the company to new locations. If you sucked, your company would find all sorts of excuses not to let you switch hoping that would encourage you to leave the firm since you are unhappy with your current location (at least that's how it is in my industry).

EuropeanADHD
04-28-16, 01:42 PM
How long should you be in a job before you look for something else to avoid employers thinking you are "job hopping"?

It depends on the field you're in, country and your age.

Among young people today the average job duration is low. One of the reasons is the prevalence of fixed-term contracts of course, but that's not the only reason.

I want to stay at least a year in my management consulting job. If I manage to stay 18 months I will treat it as a huge success. I won't be trying to stay longer than that. It's so intense that I'm not sure I will manage to stay even that long. To be honest, I'm counting days. In a few days I'm starting my 8th month.

midnightstar
04-28-16, 06:02 PM
I mean I adore the people I work with and I don't mind the job itself, transport is the issue (because I have to get 2 buses there and when winter gets here transport is going to get horrendous), transport is the reason I'm considering leaving. There's a lot of benefits to remaining in the company but the workplace nearer where I live doesn't have any suitable vacancies and they take ages with CRB etc even if you already work in the company.