View Full Version : Tiny Houses and livung simply.


ginniebean
04-24-16, 04:32 PM
I have been so jazzed about this idea of having a tiny home since I first heard of it.

I think even the biggest of tiny homes would be too small for me in part because I'm getting older and since my knee surgery the idea of a loft bed us out.

I am considering buying some land and putting a small cabin on it, maybe 500 sq feet with lofts for guests and storage.

I've been pricing it out and land, and the cabin would set me back about 100 grand.

I have always loved gardening and I would like to have chickens a couple of pigs, and some goats, maybe sheep too.

Tell me I'm not alone here, Anyone else have this dream?

Socaljaxs
04-24-16, 04:38 PM
There is a tv show out about this....and it is in a similar setup to "house hunters" it's based on people finding tiny custom homes. Very cool homes too.. However,mwhile I know some cities around the world tend to live in closer living spaces with square footage that is on the lower end. I need space to roam and store my things and closets for shoes :giggle::giggle::giggle:if I grew up in a city that the norm is smaller square footage it may be different

ginniebean
04-24-16, 05:21 PM
Yeah, I've seen the tv show and the sizes those people are talking about are much smaller than I can handle.

BellaVita
04-24-16, 08:19 PM
My dream is to live in the country with dogs! :)

I think that is so amazing.

I've never had more peace mentally than when I was staying in the country - I had no or limited wifi, no tv, no cell service....it felt so amazing. I actually got to focus on the things I cared about. I loved hiking for hours. I loved the stillness of the night.

I grew up in the city, but I never felt I belonged in the city. My heart is out in the country.

If you have a dream, then you should go for it!

Unmanagable
04-24-16, 09:47 PM
I've discovered less is more, indeed.

Moving into a much smaller home in the country and letting so much stuff go has felt incredibly freeing. But their idea of tiny is way too little for my claustrophobic self.

Gardening takes me to all the happy spaces, as well as the laborious, sweaty, painful, and sometimes disappointing ones. I can't recommend it highly enough. There's even science of some sort backing it up by explaining how something in the dirt works as an anti-depressant of sorts, but I don't remember the details.

I could only raise animals if it was a sanctuary type of a setting, which I'm afraid would grow out of control way too quickly as I'd be trying to save all the ones destined to be slaughtered.

There's a guy who built a tiny house on some land in a residential area not far from us who's being forced to remove it. It's such a cool little space, and he made it out of cedar, so the aromatherapy is quite nice, too. Wishing more places would be more accepting of them.

Creating permaculture style villages with tiny, and not so tiny, homes/cabins/yurts/teepees would be so sweet. Accommodating all levels of privacy needed/wanted as well as the community scene that fosters so much growth. Perfection, in my eyes.

ginniebean
04-25-16, 02:03 AM
Bella, one thing I doubt I'd give up on is technology. Internet is a must. I have found myself using it less and less but it's still pretty essential in life.


I grew up on a farm, I don't want all that goes with it, just a few animals and a small garden.

I'd still work in the city and enjoy being able to put in towards my retirement.

ginniebean
04-25-16, 02:07 AM
Unmanageable, Yeah, the idea of such a tiny space is not practical. I do want small tho. I'm not big on having a ton of stuff, just what I need.

I like the idea of having a place for some cats and a dog. Maybe even being an animal foster home.

sarek
04-25-16, 05:01 AM
If all goes well, my gf and I will also be looking for a "pied a terre" for her in the Netherlands, a place which I will then use as my main residence.
Since we do not want to pay rent, nor get a mortgage, we can work with available cash only which is not nearly sufficient for a regular home.

That is why we are considering alternatives. Not easy to find. A tiny house would be a great solution, but in the Dutch situation, rules and regulations make this an uphill struggle.

psychopathetic
04-25-16, 08:18 AM
I've always liked the idea of these tiny homes...I guess it brings me back to my childhood where I loved to build forts and such.
I've also always had a big fascination in having a small camper trailer. The idea of being able to take it up in the mountains and go camping without the fear of having my face eaten by a bear as I sleep (lol xP) is a lovely thought to me (I LOVE camping...but I'm so damned scared of bears I have a hard time sleeping!).

But alas!
I'm too danged messy to take these ideas too seriously. They sound great in my head...but in reality, I know I'd never keep up with things and keep things neat, clean and tidy.

psychopathetic
04-25-16, 08:25 AM
Gardening takes me to all the happy spaces, as well as the laborious, sweaty, painful, and sometimes disappointing ones. I can't recommend it highly enough. There's even science of some sort backing it up by explaining how something in the dirt works as an anti-depressant of sorts, but I don't remember the details.

My neighbor right next to my apartment is very quiet and always seems super depressed and sad :(.
But in front of each apartment there's a small space for gardens and each year she grows different things in hers and mine...and for the whole summer she's a different person! She's outside a heck of a lot more and she takes great pride in our gardens. She's always out there plucking weeds...and always beaming and gushing about how beautiful everything is! lol
Last year she was all upset because she didn't have the money to do much. So she got a few packets of random flower seeds from a dollar store...and man, it turned out great! She went on and on all summer about how pleased she was with those dollar seeds! haha

Kinda makes me wish she lived somewhere in the world where she could garden outside year around. It really lifts her up!

Sorry for going off topic! xP

yurts

They put a bunch of these up at the base of some mountains just outside of my town recently. I'd SO much rather stay in one of them, than a hotel room! I'm very tempted to go stay in one for a few days this summer.

stef
04-25-16, 08:59 AM
I love it but a city version!
Hoping to buy a small 1 bedroom in mpls, put in furniture thats in storage
I would have tv and internet tho and a few books

acdc01
04-25-16, 09:50 AM
I live in a condo that is a little over 600 sqft. The absolute perfect size for me. Any smaller and things would look messy with just the tiniest untidy. More and I'd have too much to clean.

I've always loved the idea of growing all my own food. My sister is actually building a geothermal greenhouse right now and I love the idea of a greenhouse so I could grow all year long.

But I know what I like in theory is absolutely not my preference in reality as I do not like the actual work involved in gardening at all.

Tiny houses are hard to live in where I live to cause of rules and regulations. You have to go way out of the city to live in one. I'm not sure if that kind of lifestyle actually helps the environment where I live. They would have to chop down a ton of trees to make large land for one tiny home. Also, the commute to work would be long so I would increase driving pollution a lot. Not only the commute to work, commute to anything. Right now, living in a city - I can walk or take transit to all my daily needs (though visiting others still requires driving).

Socaljaxs
04-25-16, 11:41 AM
I'm such a big city type of girl! I think I would go stir crazy, living in a small town or out in the country. I could visit though:):o.. For me,I love the hustle and bustle and the people traffic, not car traffic :lol::eyebrow: or sitting in traffic but the congestion of others, and abundance of people always around.

For me Total isolation or rarely seeing others, would freak me out... I could totally see this tiny house idea as a to visit or a vacation type home.. Preferable near water... Like a tiny, beach house lol :giggle: I'm more relaxed and calmer when I happen to be near any body of water... Isolated or even camping in the desert or high in the mountains doesn't give me the same calmness.

As for gardening, my mom loved it.... It was such a positive therapeutic pastime and passion for her, I never got into it. I just don't find it relaxing....

My mom found her passion and love of gardening, when she was first diagnosed with ovarian cancer about 13 years ago. My mom and a close friend of hers, would spend free weekends and any day off one or both had available at my parents house, gardening and creating/maintaining the plants...even now our friend still comes over when she has a day off to garden. She find it keeps her close to my mom:(

My mom would be so exciting to see and smell her flowers and vegetables, herbs and trees blooming in our front/back/side yard..My dad every week, cuts a bouquet of my mom's flowers from our home and bring them to her grave... It's such a loving yer heartbreakingly beautiful scene to watch my dad wondering and choosing which one to bring her each week.

Bella, one thing I doubt I'd give up on is technology. Internet is a must. I have found myself using it less and less but it's still pretty essential in life.


I grew up on a farm, I don't want all that goes with it, just a few animals and a small garden.

I'd still work in the city and enjoy being able to put in towards my retirement.

ginniebean
04-25-16, 12:11 PM
awww so touching and heartbreaking. I'm sorry for your loss. Losing a parent is such a loss. Some days are so much harder than others and it is the memorirs that pop up with both plrasure and pain. My heart goes out to you. <3


I lost my dad a few years back and when he was dying the only acknoeledgement of it was that he didn't want one of those fancy urns with flowers or "****" on it. He was a tough kinda guy. But all of us were aware just hoe much he loved carnations. Every year he would dig them up and then plant them in spring. He told me his mother loved them and I believe they were a connection to her.

I'm going to go and buy a basket of carnations in memory today.

ginniebean
04-25-16, 12:12 PM
I love it but a city version!
Hoping to buy a small 1 bedroom in mpls, put in furniture thats in storage
I would have tv and internet tho and a few books

A littlr hideout! Perfect! <3

dvdnvwls
04-25-16, 12:39 PM
Just my opinion, and maybe just my opinion for today :) :

Simple living and simple houses can be opposed to each other, instead of harmoniously working together. Part of my personal definition of simple living is that when I need something it's there. Tiny-house proponents, on hearing people's complaints or concerns, often say something like "Well, for that, you can always just..."

I don't want to "always just..."! That, to me, is the opposite of simple, and I think with ADHD the problem of having to cobble together creative solutions to self-imposed environmental deficiencies would be particularly troublesome. So (if I get to choose), please give me a big complicated house with room for all my stuff and room to do things, and let me solve the problems once, instead of forcing myself to solve them over and over.

One of humanity's primary skills is our ability to transform our personal environment to make it do what we need and want it to do. I see the "simple house" and "tiny house" and so on movements as voluntarily giving up one of our primary skills, in exchange for - well, nearly nothing. Because when we do live in such a place and we find we need or want to do something that our new house has made difficult, we are going to find a way, and "reinvent the wheel" in the process, with the wasted time and energy that that entails - not to mention that in the final analysis we would then be making a less efficient use of resources.


Shorter version:

It seems to me that what people are calling "living simply" really has nothing to do with simplicity; it's more like "living with reduced capabilities, reduced possibilities, and an exponential increase in wasted time, in exchange for projected benefits that aren't going to happen".

acdc01
04-25-16, 01:33 PM
It seems to me that what people are calling "living simply" really has nothing to do with simplicity; it's more like "living with reduced capabilities, reduced possibilities, and an exponential increase in wasted time, in exchange for projected benefits that aren't going to happen".

I agree and disagree with you. It depends on what you love. If you love gardening, taking care of a homestead - then its a simpler life for you.

If you're talking about actual amount of work you'd have to do, I agree a tiny home out in the wilderness would not be simple.

The simpliest life I think in terms of how much effort you need to put in (short of living on the street) is what I'm living. The tiny condo in a pedestrian friendly area that isn't too tiny (600-800 sqft depending on 1-2 people and how many toys you have). Hardwood floors for easy cleaning. Urban enough for cheap grocery delivery or take out. Everything within walking distance (park, shopping, restaurants, work, bowling alley, movie theatre, bike trails, good transit connections, etc.). Best living arrangement in my opinion if you are ok urban life. I'm not talking about big city either. You can get this in less dense areas now at least where I live cause they are pushing for "livable communities" these days where there's really a bunch of mini cities surrounding a much larger city.

dvdnvwls
04-25-16, 01:41 PM
I agree and disagree with you. It depends on what you love. If you love gardening, taking care of a homestead - then its a simpler life for you.

If you're talking about actual amount of work you'd have to do, I agree a tiny home out in the wilderness would not be simple.

The simpliest life I think in terms of how much effort you need to put in (short of living on the street) is what I'm living. The tiny condo in a pedestrian friendly area that isn't too tiny (600-800 sqft depending on 1-2 people and how many toys you have). Hardwood floors for easy cleaning. Urban enough for cheap grocery delivery or take out. Everything within walking distance (park, shopping, restaurants, work, bowling alley, movie theatre, bike trails, good transit connections, etc.). Best living arrangement in my opinion if you are ok urban life. I'm not talking about big city either. You can get this in less dense areas now at least where I live cause they are pushing for "livable communities" these days where there's really a bunch of mini cities surrounding a much larger city.

Yes, that seems quite different from what the tiny-house people seem to be envisioning.

If my house is truly tiny as some of the experimental units are, I can't invite friends and I can't plan interesting indoor activities that require equipment or space.

acdc01
04-25-16, 04:05 PM
Yes, that seems quite different from what the tiny-house people seem to be envisioning.

If my house is truly tiny as some of the experimental units are, I can't invite friends and I can't plan interesting indoor activities that require equipment or space.

I got interested in the subject because of this thread and spent 15 minutes looking stuff up. In my area, the tiny homes get a steal in terms of property taxes. Like it's the difference between $700 and $7000 per year in property tax cause they put their homes on trailers so the home doesn't get taxed as a house (only property gets taxed).

So unfair as they use the roads, parks, etc. and all the other stuff the property taxes pay for. They actually use them more if they squeeze a whole bunch of tiny houses on one property (more drivers/people). I hope they change the laws on this. People are really supporting tiny homes in my area though so I suspect if rules change it won't be to make the tiny homes pay their fair share of taxes but to help more tiny homes be built.

Guess it's a way for people to not be tied to debt though which is good. Decided I could probably stand living in one though I would never be as comfortable as I am with my 600 sqft home (though perhaps I'd have more money for retirement).

acdc01
04-28-16, 01:09 AM
Ginnybean, I saw some tinyhomes made especially for seniors so easy on the knees. They're actually about 400 sqft and look livable (for me anyway) based on the video. Main bedroom is downstairs and some have lofts too in addition to the ground level bedroom in case you have a guest or something. Loft has ladder but it's optional anyway so doesn't matter.

I don't know about your area but in mine, if your tiny home is on wheels or qualifies as a portable home, you get taxed only on the property and not the home so property tax drops substantionally. I'd have to check the max trailer size to see what qualifies for the tax exemption though.

Interesting topic. I'm a little too interested in tiny homes now.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nSJQGdx0x3w