View Full Version : Doctor gave up, why?


Caco3girl
04-28-16, 02:36 PM
My 13 year old son was diagnosed in December with ADHD. His school did the various mental tests, scales with me and his teachers, and observations and I got a spiffy report that basically said he zones out and has impulsive traits. So, I took that to the pediatrician. She said it sounded like ADHD and we started the medicine train.

Vyvanse low dose no effect
Vyvanse double the dose = aggression/angst boy (stopped on day two)
Aderall XR low dose = no effect
Aderall XR higher dose = no effect
Conerta 18mg = not sure if it's working
Conerta 54 mg = not sure if it's working

Due to some truly special teachers his entire schedule changed in January. His grades are better but no one can say if that is from getting away from the special teachers who wanted him to be in a very specific box and when he couldn't conform they sent him to the office DAILY (yup, still ticked about that one), or was it any of the meds, or was it understanding what his issue was, or maybe it was he just tried harder?

The concerta 54 was the ONLY one he finished the whole bottle of. I called back into the doctors office to say that my son didn't know if it was working and is there something higher, is there something else to try, the doctor said "I give up, go see a psychiatrist, one of those should have worked."

Is that normal?

Socaljaxs
04-28-16, 02:48 PM
My 13 year old son was diagnosed in December with ADHD. His school did the various mental tests, scales with me and his teachers, and observations and I got a spiffy report that basically said he zones out and has impulsive traits. So, I took that to the pediatrician. She said it sounded like ADHD and we started the medicine train.

Vyvanse low dose no effect
Vyvanse double the dose = aggression/angst boy (stopped on day two)
Aderall XR low dose = no effect
Aderall XR higher dose = no effect
Conerta 18mg = not sure if it's working
Conerta 54 mg = not sure if it's working

Due to some truly special teachers his entire schedule changed in January. His grades are better but no one can say if that is from getting away from the special teachers who wanted him to be in a very specific box and when he couldn't conform they sent him to the office DAILY (yup, still ticked about that one), or was it any of the meds, or was it understanding what his issue was, or maybe it was he just tried harder?

The concerta 54 was the ONLY one he finished the whole bottle of. I called back into the doctors office to say that my son didn't know if it was working and is there something higher, is there something else to try, the doctor said "I give up, go see a psychiatrist, one of those should have worked."

Is that normal?

On concerta, has there been any change in his behavior, at all? Even slight changes showing? It won't always be a night/day difference. Subtle changes may be happening. In terms of giving up sadly the doctor is either helping by referring him to a specialist or is lazy. One of the two or both lol.. Did he make any recommendation to a doctor you should see?

There are a ton of medications still available for your son to try. So even if the doctor gives up you don't have too. You son may find group coaching or an ADHD coach helpful as well. But a specialist may be able to give you and your son more help and changes you may not realizes are taking place

psychopathetic
04-28-16, 02:52 PM
No! Not normal. Bad doctor is bad! :mad:

I mean...doctors referring people to other doctors and specialists is one thing...but to give up like yours did and to say it in such a way, is NOT normal. It's unprofessional. How frustrating and I'm sorry that you had to experience this.

In my opinion your doc should've kept trying new things out. You and your son have shown a willingness to find meds and doses that work...so as long as you guys were putting in effort, your doctor should've been doing their job and putting an effort into it as well.

Ah well...I hope you can find someone else and that they can help you and your son. Clearly this doc wasn't up for the task.

(((Hugs)))

Cyllya
04-28-16, 02:56 PM
I think she was trying to say something like, "I've tried all the treatment plans I'm familiar with; if none of these work, you'll want to try a specialist," which is pretty reasonable and not uncommon. She should have given you a referral to a psychiatrist and maybe offered to refill the concerta.

Socaljaxs
04-28-16, 03:00 PM
I think she was trying to say something like, "I've tried all the treatment plans I'm familiar with; if none of these work, you'll want to try a specialist," which is pretty reasonable and not uncommon. She should have given you a referral to a psychiatrist and maybe offered to refill the concerta.

It is possible medications are having some slight effects however, it may be subtle, so it isn't getting noticed, this may be where a specialist can offer more guidance and plans for your son. I hope the doctor meant it as stated above, but if not get a referral and dump that doc

sarahsweets
04-28-16, 04:18 PM
Due to some truly special teachers his entire schedule changed in January. His grades are better but no one can say if that is from getting away from the special teachers who wanted him to be in a very specific box and when he couldn't conform they sent him to the office DAILY (yup, still ticked about that one), or was it any of the meds, or was it understanding what his issue was, or maybe it was he just tried harder?

Im thinking this is sarcasm right? Well stay on top of teachers like this. You dont want him to be left behind because they dont want to be bothered with him.

The concerta 54 was the ONLY one he finished the whole bottle of. I called back into the doctors office to say that my son didn't know if it was working and is there something higher, is there something else to try, the doctor said "I give up, go see a psychiatrist, one of those should have worked."

Is that normal?

Well, even though your son is 13, he is 30% less mature than those of his age and the ability to self evaluate is something that takes time and experience to learn. He probably really cant tell if its working or not because he cant look at himself objectively. This is when your record keeping of his moods, and other things at home combined with on board teachers will be the most benefit to any doctor thats treating him. Yes, he should see a psyche doctor but maybe while your waiting for an appt his doc would be willing to refill the concerta? Just because it didnt seem to affect him negatively so the chance that it could positively help are good.

CrazyLazyGal
04-28-16, 04:18 PM
I think she was trying to say something like, "I've tried all the treatment plans I'm familiar with; if none of these work, you'll want to try a specialist," which is pretty reasonable and not uncommon. She should have given you a referral to a psychiatrist and maybe offered to refill the concerta.

This. She's reached the limit of her training and experience. Most kids respond to the treatments she tried, but your kid is in the minority, and he would be better served by a specialist who is more experienced treating the non-majority cases.

If she didn't refer you to a specialist, get on her case about it but don't assume it's because she was negligent. Sometimes doctors don't know any good specialists for that particular condition. I was sent to a neurologist for Tourette's because that's the neurologist my doctor knew. When I got there, it was full of elderly patients with dementia. The doctor said he really knew nothing about Tourette's because almost all his patients are those with dementia. He wasn't specially trained in dementia, that's just how it turned out because of the demographics of that area and the fact that he developed a good reputation among geriatricians. I had to go to someone else, setting my treatment back a few months due to the waiting time.

Another time my doctor said that the two specialists she knew were both a**h***s :lol: It took her a while to find someone for me.

I'd be surprised if your doctor didn't know of a child psychiatrist though since surely site has patients who see one and are satisfied. She should make some calls for you to get you an appointment because you're more likely to be seen in a timely fashion if your doctor contacts the specialist.

QueensU_girl
04-29-16, 10:10 AM
Has your child seen a Neurologist? They really should rule out Dissociation and Seizure Disorders before sending him to Psychiatry, etc.

Socaljaxs
04-29-16, 10:54 AM
Well, even though your son is 13, he is 30% less mature than those of his age and the ability to self evaluate is something that takes time and experience to learn. He probably really cant tell if its working or not because he cant look at himself objectively. This is when your record keeping of his moods, and other things at home combined with on board teachers will be the most benefit to any doctor thats treating him.
:thankyou::goodpost: this I agree 100% on this. I'm still finding self evaluation extremely difficult. And I'm almost 3 times your sons age:giggle:.. Keep notes and don't rely on him to tell you if it is or isn't working pay attention to his behavior/attention levels, impulses ext on/off medication. Subtle changes are hard to notice on ones self, outside view of ones behavior is usually a very strong indicator as to affects if any on meds.

Has your child seen a Neurologist? They really should rule out Dissociation and Seizure Disorders before sending him to Psychiatry, etc.

Any reason why you say this? or elaborate as to the reason why you say this?

Caco3girl
04-29-16, 11:59 AM
I agree, he can't self evaluate. This was the first time we went through the whole bottle so I asked if he felt it was working, the response I got was something like "Um, no, well maybe, well, no I don't think so, I don't feel any different, so probably not"

The problem I am having is that I wake him up at 6am, give him his medicine, and then I leave for work. I don't see him again until around 5pm, so the medicine may not even be working by then. On the weekends he plays high level baseball, so he's surrounded by other teenage boys in a competitive environment so again, hard to judge his behavior. He's more inattentive than hyperactive, I imagine hyperactive would be easier to see.

I took him off of it this week and have sent emails to his teachers just now telling them what I did and asking if they have noticed any changes in his ability to understand or stay on task. I guess we will see if THEY can tell me anything useful.