View Full Version : Do you think it's good to grow up with several languages?


Fuzzy12
04-29-16, 03:56 PM
Summary: do you think it's confusing or detrimental in any way for a child to grow up with more than one or two languages? Does it aid or impede their development?

Here is the uber long background story:

We've been wondering what language we should use to talk to lil fuzzling. I'll have to do some research on this but thought it would be interesting to hear your opinions. Everything is welcome from anecdotal experience to opinions to research.

It's a bit complicated. Hubsy speaks 5-6 languages fluently and I speak 2 fluently and a third (my mother tongue) crappily. The only language that hubs and me have in common is English so we speak to each other in that. Hubs is planning to speak to lil Fuzz in the national language of my country and suggested that I speak to her in the language of the country I grew up in. The hope is that she'll naturally pick up English since we live here.

I think it's good to grow up bilingually (I've heard that apart from the benefit of knowing another language it stimulates your brain but that could be rubbish. As I said I still need to do my research on this) but more than that I'm not sure. Wouldn't it be too confusing for her? Would it impede her learning English or in general picking up language and communication skills?

It feels a bit fake to me to speak to her in English and I've got a rubbish accent in English but then I've got very little connections left with the country I grew up in so that seems odd too. Also it might be a bit odd then that hubsy and me won't really understand what the other is talking to lil Fuzz. Hubsy is a whiz with languages though and I might slowly pick up his languages too. I wish we both naturally spoke a common language (that isn't English). Maybe it's not such a big deal. In my home country most kids grow up with at least 2 languages but often many more than that and they do perfectly fine.

Anyway I'm rambling..what do you think?

midnightstar
04-29-16, 04:08 PM
Having more than one language used for little Fuzzy shouldn't be a problem because if you grow up with something you think it's normal :grouphug: hope this helps :grouphug:

Roundmouth
04-29-16, 04:17 PM
Multiligualism is good for brain developement. By the way, I saw a TV program about a child growing up with Klingon as first language. Abandonned it very soon though on own initiative, realizing nobody else speaks it.

stef
04-29-16, 05:03 PM
OMG
its a mega advantage!!!
I didnt know and i spoke both french and english to my son and well he totally rejected english until age 11 ( although he understood it and then suddenly spoke in full sentences one summer)and this caused huge problems with my parents, and he still has a bit of a french accent.

ech parent needs to cosistently speak the language they choose. it will all click with the child dont worry!

Fuzzy12
04-29-16, 05:15 PM
But 3 languages? Is that too many? And then hubs and me would still be speaking in English with each other because that's our only common language. If she has adhd would that make a difference?

Also once she joins nursery will she struggle to make friends if she doesn't speak lots of English by then?

Roundmouth
04-29-16, 06:02 PM
But 3 languages? Is that too many? And then hubs and me would still be speaking in English with each other because that's our only common language. If she has adhd would that make a difference?

Also once she joins nursery will she struggle to make friends if she doesn't speak lots of English by then?

Use signs too along with the verbal languages. If possible, try and mix verbal French or whatever with Estonian or whatever signs. Or signs along with whisteling to encourage synaestethic connections. Stimulation for a brain with possible ADHD traits. Imagine her developing something like tourette... expressed in three verbal languages and some complex signlingual motoric tics on that. English will be the least problem if that's what's spoken around her. Children learn in zero time and small children don't seem to bother much if verbal communication isn't 100% perfect.

Roundmouth
04-29-16, 06:45 PM
Kind of like a general advice, not only language specifically but the whole parantal thing: Don't be so anxious, just mangle ahead. Some people obviously really fail with their parenting but not because they've not been anxious enough. In fact that's not only true about parenting but actually about most things. I'd say everything. Self-regulation is a threat against humanity, maybe far worse than any skrulls, reptile men or body thetans.

Fuzzy12
10-13-16, 07:04 AM
I'm getting seriously confused about the whole language thing.

She's almost 2 months now and so far we have predominantly been speaking to her in English. The original plan was for me to speak in my language, fuzzlish, and hubby to speak to her in one of the half dozen languages he knows.

The problem is that now both of us are most comfortable in English, think in English and we also speak in English with each other. I feel odd speaking to her in fuzzlish though I'm fluent in it and unlike English don't have a sucky accent.

From this week on i thought i should really make an effort to speak to her in fuzzlish but I keep forgetting. I instinctively speak in English. It's a tad more comfortable for me though I think I could get used to fuzzlish if I just stuck with it. Also, hubby doesn't understand much fuzzlish. He doesnt mind and we have discussed this but still it seems a bit odd.

All the advice I've read keeps insisting that whatever you do be consistent. Each parent should only speak in one language. I just can't remember though. I'm close to giving up. With everything else that's going on its not a priority but at the same time it seems like a wasted opportunity if she doesn't learn at least one other language.

psychopathetic
10-13-16, 08:15 AM
I don't have any research or any sort of education on this at all...all I have is an opinion...

And I'm STRONGLY for children growing up learning multiple languages. I wish all schools taught kids a second language...I also wish all schools taught kids to learn to read music.
Like I said, I don't have any research backing me on this or anything...but I just can't imagine how it wouldn't be a very positive thing for kids. They'd be at a strict advantage as adults compared to others who weren't able to speak a second language or read music.

(((((((Lil-Fuzz-Fuzzling)))))))

psychopathetic
10-13-16, 08:16 AM
The original plan was for me to speak in my language, fuzzlish...

:lol:

...okay, what is fuzzlish? lol

Little Missy
10-13-16, 08:22 AM
I don't have any research or any sort of education on this at all...all I have is an opinion...

And I'm STRONGLY for children growing up learning multiple languages. I wish all schools taught kids a second language...I also wish all schools taught kids to learn to read music.
Like I said, I don't have any research backing me on this or anything...but I just can't imagine how it wouldn't be a very positive thing for kids. They'd be at a strict advantage as adults compared to others who weren't able to speak a second language or read music.

(((((((Lil-Fuzz-Fuzzling)))))))

They USED to do this but sports began to take over fine arts.

psychopathetic
10-13-16, 08:26 AM
They USED to do this but sports began to take over fine arts.

:( :mad:

stef
10-13-16, 08:44 AM
I'm getting seriously confused about the whole language thing.

She's almost 2 months now and so far we have predominantly been speaking to her in English. The original plan was for me to speak in my language, fuzzlish, and hubby to speak to her in one of the half dozen languages he knows.

The problem is that now both of us are most comfortable in English, think in English and we also speak in English with each other. I feel odd speaking to her in fuzzlish though I'm fluent in it and unlike English don't have a sucky accent.

From this week on i thought i should really make an effort to speak to her in fuzzlish but I keep forgetting. I instinctively speak in English. It's a tad more comfortable for me though I think I could get used to fuzzlish if I just stuck with it. Also, hubby doesn't understand much fuzzlish. He doesnt mind and we have discussed this but still it seems a bit odd.

All the advice I've read keeps insisting that whatever you do be consistent. Each parent should only speak in one language. I just can't remember though. I'm close to giving up. With everything else that's going on its not a priority but at the same time it seems like a wasted opportunity if she doesn't learn at least one other language.

Wow this is complicated! if English is the language used at home but then neither of you are native speakers (is that the right word), that's complex. If I was at my old law firm i could have asked one of my bosses about this.
Do you know any other parents who speak "Fuzzlish" ? ( :giggle: ) (that is cute)

Fuzzy12
10-13-16, 09:33 AM
I don't have any research or any sort of education on this at all...all I have is an opinion...

And I'm STRONGLY for children growing up learning multiple languages. I wish all schools taught kids a second language...I also wish all schools taught kids to learn to read music.
Like I said, I don't have any research backing me on this or anything...but I just can't imagine how it wouldn't be a very positive thing for kids. They'd be at a strict advantage as adults compared to others who weren't able to speak a second language or read music.

(((((((Lil-Fuzz-Fuzzling)))))))

Oh..I should definitely teach her how to read music...but not right now. She can just acout focus on my face for a few seconds :lol:

In my country of ethnic origin most people speak 2-3 languages or more and English is heavily mixed in while talking but kids still don't get confused so maybe I shouldn't worry.

In English speaking countries thr problem, or maybe the advantage, is that you don't really need any other language so I guess the motivation and ajso the opportunity to learn other languages is less.

That's my problem as well. There is no need really for her to learn any other language except that I yhink it might be advantageous for her development. And it would seem odd to always have to speak in English when we are obviously not native British.

Funnily enough I almost always speak to my parents in English except when we are in public. Then for some reason I tend to speak to them in our mother tongue. Maybe I'm just naturally secretive but I instinctively switch over. I don't really know why but I'm used to having a language that other people arojd4 us can't understand. It annoys me a bit that hubby and me don't have that and can't have private conversations in public.

Fuzzy12
10-13-16, 09:35 AM
Wow this is complicated! if English is the language used at home but then neither of you are native speakers (is that the right word), that's complex. If I was at my old law firm i could have asked one of my bosses about this.
Do you know any other parents who speak "Fuzzlish" ? ( :giggle: ) (that is cute)

No, just my parents but they prefer to speak to her in their mother tongue though if they heard me speak to her in fuzzlish they could and probably would easily switch over.

aeon
10-13-16, 11:37 AM
The more the merrier, I think. Good for the brain, good for the world.

For sure, the predominant language in the home when I was a child was English.

But my mother would always pepper what she said to my sister and I with bits and pieces of what she had learned from her things of interest...mainly French, and bits of Russian and whatnot.

And there was always music on the stereo from all over the world, so I knew songs from here and there in their native tongue.

I think it is good for a child (and adult) to learn languages if they have the opportunity and environment to do so.


Cheers,
Ian

finallyfound10
01-24-17, 02:27 PM
I'll bet that there are whole forums about multi-lingual families with tips and experiences.

Fuzzy12
01-24-17, 08:59 PM
Hubby speaks to fuzzling in English and I speak to her in fuzzlish as planned.

Also my mom and dad speak to her in both English and their mother tongue, mil speaks to her in her mother tongue and fil speaks to her in English and his mother tongue. :lol::doh:

So she's exposed to 5 different languages but she's realistically only going to pick up English and fuzzlish. Apparently kids need about 30% exposure to learn a language.

It would have been Brilliant if our parents could have picked either English or fuzzlish to reinforce them but i guess they'd rather speak to.her in the language they are most comfortable with. I didn't ask them to do me that favour. Let them be comfortable interacting with Fuzzling however they want.