View Full Version : Adhd kids do better with therapy first? Article....


sarahsweets
05-01-16, 06:28 AM
http://www.nbcnews.com/health/kids-health/kids-adhd-do-better-therapy-first-study-finds-n563651
I get it. Therapy with meds is best but therapy first instead of meds? I don't know if I can get behind this. How did they determine that a first line treatment is now a second line treatment ?
Granted I know this is a media article and the media hypes adhd in one way or another but I feel like this could really sway parents because it's so mainstream.
I'll comment more later.
What do you all think ?

casper
05-01-16, 08:41 AM
Interesting. I would like to see more studies on this.

Seems like it could hold some weight

aeon
05-01-16, 10:48 AM
The article was simpleminded.

Of course operant conditioning works, on children as well as adults, with ADHD or not.

This should be part of parenting any child, in my opinion, but whether or not it can become a first-line treatment for ADHD
is still very much up in the air.

First, the rest of the world isn’t going to interact with the child in such a fashion.

Second, it may miss out on the neuroplastic effects of psychostimulant medication which would be beneficial at that
stage of development.

“Praise good behavior, ignore the rest” only goes so far.


Cheers,
Ian

ginniebean
05-01-16, 02:38 PM
I found this on web MD.

http://www.webmd.com/add-adhd/childhood-adhd/news/20160218/behavioral-therapy-adhd

However, some experts noted that the researchers focused on behavior and not on other issues, such as attention and learning problems, that can quickly improve with drug treatment.

I am a huge fan of behaviou therapy and it is effective. It's wonderful for things like social skills training and for relationships with parents. It's a huge cost up front, the 2k mentioned seems under quoted. I'd like to see follow ups as well six months, a year and two years later.

This is a bit misleading tho, many kids with Adhd-Pi do not have problems with social behaviour issues so this leaves many out.

Behaviour therapy can't work on attention issues or distractability. Naturally the media chose to cherry pick and ignore the limitations of Applied Behaviour Therapy.

Cyllya
05-01-16, 08:06 PM
Yeah, behavior therapy is not going to cure you of a medical condition.

Both articles were a little vague on exactly what difference the therapy made, but it sounds like "behavior problems" were the only thing they were targeting or measuring. Yay, it reduces ONE symptom. :rolleyes: (Fun fact: I have ADHD, but I was apparently the world's most convenient child, judging both by my own memory and by my mom's stories.)

Part of me wishes that that society would indeed push more for some kind of "family therapy" which would actually be thinly disguised parenting classes. What they described in the first article is generally how most parents should act regardless of whether their kid has special needs. (There's one camp of parenting gurus who feel that manipulating your kids' behavior with rewards and punishments is actually a bad idea in the long term, but even those guys would probably agree that this approach is the lesser of evils compared to traditional habits of ignoring good behavior and punishing bad behavior. And even if you aren't going to actively use rewards/punishment, you should still acknowledge that it's an existent psychological phenomenon.) But it would be bad if the "therapy" was basically an obstacle in the way of real treatment. Not only would it be a waste of time and money for people who already took parenting classes or read books, etc, but some parents wouldn't be able to attend therapy because of their job.

sarahsweets
05-04-16, 04:42 AM
Yeah, behavior therapy is not going to cure you of a medical condition.

Both articles were a little vague on exactly what difference the therapy made, but it sounds like "behavior problems" were the only thing they were targeting or measuring. Yay, it reduces ONE symptom. :rolleyes: (Fun fact: I have ADHD, but I was apparently the world's most convenient child, judging both by my own memory and by my mom's stories.)

Thats interesting. Now that you bring that up, all of my kids have adhd, but my youngest has always been such a good, rule following child.

Part of me wishes that that society would indeed push more for some kind of "family therapy" which would actually be thinly disguised parenting classes. What they described in the first article is generally how most parents should act regardless of whether their kid has special needs. (There's one camp of parenting gurus who feel that manipulating your kids' behavior with rewards and punishments is actually a bad idea in the long term, but even those guys would probably agree that this approach is the lesser of evils compared to traditional habits of ignoring good behavior and punishing bad behavior. And even if you aren't going to actively use rewards/punishment, you should still acknowledge that it's an existent psychological phenomenon.) But it would be bad if the "therapy" was basically an obstacle in the way of real treatment. Not only would it be a waste of time and money for people who already took parenting classes or read books, etc, but some parents wouldn't be able to attend therapy because of their job.
I think therapy is good for about 99.9% of the world. I havent met a single person who wouldnt benefit from therapy yet. And family therapy would be great for special needs kids for sure. So many parents want to punish the adhd out of the kid, or think their child is deliberately trying to push their buttons, when in actuality the child cant find their voice or the right words to express their feelings related to adhd.
Family therapy would certainly be good for all, but IME its lacking in homes with special needs kids.