View Full Version : Careers for people with ADD


guffman44
05-03-16, 01:47 PM
I'm 57. I have failed many in many jobs. I have been in I.T. for many years and have done many things except programming. A handful I was fairly good at. Most I have not been. I have struggled not only with the A.D.D., but with auditory processing, which cost me the job before my current one. I could not get on the same page as my manager as far as what she wanted, and she fired me after 3 months. Now I'm in the worst job possible for a person with my....er....disabilities? I'm in an I.T. call Center. All kinds of noise around me. I literally can't think. I'm taking calls, but I can't understand what they want half the time, so I need help a lot.

So it's late for me in life, and I would like opinions on what kind of jobs are best for an inattentive ADD'er like me with auditory processing deficiencies? I'm at the end of my rope. If I'm going to make a change in careers, the time is now. Anyone have suggestions? I'm Googling this too, but I would like feedback from you all.

Thanks

Cyllya
05-05-16, 04:12 AM
Besides poor auditory processing, what are your other impairments? Even among people with ADHD, we're affected differently, so people might be better able to give you more personalized recommendations if you describe yourself more. (Sometimes I see waiter/waitress suggested as a good ADHD job, which always baffles me. I'm terrible at pretty much every skill that would require, mostly for ADHD-related reasons.)

I've had good results as a scripter (programmer/developer) for a law firm. Previously, I was a legal assistant at the same law firm, which had its downsides but was doable.

While there are some jobs that are guaranteed to be horrible fit, I feel like generally it has more to do with the specifics of a particular employer/boss than it does with the industry or type of job. For example, I'm terrible at punctuality. If an employer requires me to consistently show up on time, regardless of whether I work late, they'll eventually fire me (or take away PTO so I can't take a day off). There are a lot of employers who require punctuality even when it's not legitimately required for the work. (My current employer is actually one of those, but I managed to get in a particular job position where nobody really enforces a schedule.)

acdc01
05-07-16, 09:51 AM
You're someone that clearly needs accommodations if you can't find meds that help you (if you haven't tried meds, recommend you do).

After you get a job offer letter and signed it and gave it back to them, my recommendation is to disclose immediately that you have a disability that affects your auditory processing if it's the only thing that really holds you back. Have a doctors note proving that you have a disability - note should be vague just saying you have a disability and not specifying what that disability is. There isn't as much stigma against poor hearing so disclosure isn't as much an issue.

For accommodations, have them write down any instructions to you to the extent possible or/and just warn them you may have to ask a few times before you get it but you will get it eventually.

If you have more issues than just auditory processing that affect your job, what are they?

Pretty much every job you need to listen to someone to get your initial instructions so accommodations are needed for you. But do pick a job that lets you work with less speaking. A security guard (for a business that's closed at night - not a residential condo as people ask security guards questions all the time) doesn't have to talk much. Mail delivery person. There was a job I knew of where the person just went from business to business bringing rented plants to people and watering them.

InvitroCanibal
05-08-16, 06:00 AM
Well my fiancee does at home correspondence work as a PHP junior software developer. It seems like most of their interwork discussion is through Slack.

Other than that, what I do is Peer work, mentoring, and Advocacy for adult to youth with disabilities and disorders of all kinds.

I also do internal consulting and care coordination EHR logistics software management on the side using PHP applications that I design which are then implemented by my fiancee... She really does most of the work honestly.

In spite of that, I am treated pretty bad and paid pretty low lol but I like working 1:1 with the clients I work for and I guess having auditory processing issues myself, I sort of narurally tune out the clinicians that try to bring me down about my job.

I can only do 1:1. It becomes difficult to follow and pay attention to an entire group.

Anyways, I'd try telecommute. My fiancee has made it to tier 3 junior development in two months without really having much experience prior and no college degree either.


Sometimes it just takes a good cover letter lol.

Pilgrim
10-11-16, 07:01 PM
Not to state the obvious, but if you have auditory processing issues it may not be best to work at a call centre.

From personal experience when I need to remain focused and I'm having trouble blocking things out this can be a form of torture.

One suggestion, ask people who know you what they think, they will probably understand and see you better than you do.

I have to believe there is always somewhere where you can make a crust, I think in regards to ADD there's lots of factors.

It may, in my case pretty much essential a coach or therapist who can point you in the right direction. This was a bit easier than I thought.

Steer away from industries that don't play to your strengths you will have enough challenges.

My 2 cents.

Lloyd_
10-24-16, 09:56 PM
I'm 57. I have failed many in many jobs. I have been in I.T. for many years and have done many things except programming. A handful I was fairly good at. Most I have not been. I have struggled not only with the A.D.D., but with auditory processing, which cost me the job before my current one. I could not get on the same page as my manager as far as what she wanted, and she fired me after 3 months. Now I'm in the worst job possible for a person with my....er....disabilities? I'm in an I.T. call Center. All kinds of noise around me. I literally can't think. I'm taking calls, but I can't understand what they want half the time, so I need help a lot.

So it's late for me in life, and I would like opinions on what kind of jobs are best for an inattentive ADD'er like me with auditory processing deficiencies? I'm at the end of my rope. If I'm going to make a change in careers, the time is now. Anyone have suggestions? I'm Googling this too, but I would like feedback from you all.

Thanks

This is the very same problem with following verbal directions and soon as I can afford to go to an audiologist I'm going to see if they have anything solutions for me.

One thing that has helped me a little bit is getting into the habit of asking people to repeat themselves, so many times I thought I heard them say one thing when in reality they said something entirely different.

People like us or at least in my case I'm pretty confident I wouldn't have any issues with workplace performance if all my information and directions were in written form.

diagoro
11-04-16, 10:20 AM
I'm in a similar boat, almost 50 and struggling at work. I work in the Financial Aid dept of a small university, mostly processing documents. I've had the chance to advance, but even with meds, can't wrap my mind around the immense amount of federal/state/local regulations, etc. I'm also dysfunctional/dyslexic when it comes to math, not a good thing for someone who would be determining loan amounts.

I'm also highly distracted by noise, and have a hard time with 'verbal only' directions. My boss originally trained me. I tried to take notes, but ended up lost within about 30 seconds, and had to ask several times later. It's a struggle. What someone said before works, as for written directions, take compulsive notes (and go back over them/rewrite).

As for noise in your current position, I'm assuming you use a headset. Do they have one ear piece or two? Using a stereo headset might help block out noise, especially if you can find one that also has noise cancelling!