View Full Version : ADDers working in the mental health field?


Lloyd_
05-09-16, 04:08 PM
I was just wondering if anyone here works with those in the mental health field who suffer from various forms of schizophrenia or other mental illnesses?

Being an ADDer and somebody who has dealt with my own struggles, I believe that I could somewhat help those worse off than me.

Fuzzy12
05-09-16, 04:19 PM
Well, the psychiatrist who diagnosed me apparently had adhd. I guess there might be people who want to help those who have gone through similar things. Having some of the same experiences can only help I guess to understand better and have a bit more of compassion and we might be more likely to.keep up to date out of genuine interest.

I wish I'd studied something that would allow me to work in this field.

Lloyd_
05-09-16, 04:49 PM
Well, the psychiatrist who diagnosed me apparently had adhd. I guess there might be people who want to help those who have gone through similar things. Having some of the same experiences can only help I guess to understand better and have a bit more of compassion and we might be more likely to.keep up to date out of genuine interest.

I wish I'd studied something that would allow me to work in this field.

Sadly a lot of those people are more far gone than we are and some of them held in psychiatric care are violent. Now that I think about it being an ADDer working in this field could go terribly wrong too if you blurt out or give the wrong response to a patient that might try to physically assault you! :eek:

Any insights from others is encouraged as well. :)

acdc01
05-09-16, 05:04 PM
I can't believe the incompetency in pretty much every dr. I've seen. I'd rather go to a doctor that has ADHD than one without any day.

I think they would keep up with information more like Fuzzy said and care more too.

Everyone on this board always gives such good advice too so I just believe in ADHDers more.

But it really does depend on your own symptoms. If you do have a habit of blurting out insults to your patients, that might be a problem if you can't figure out a way to solve the issue.

I actually thought about being an ADHD coach as the schooling is limited and the hourly salary is extremely good in my area (I'd do it just for extra income anyway). But I too was afraid of the safety risks with up to 80% of us having comorbids. If you work in a hospital setting though, I imagine there is an alert button you push to bring security in. I think invitrocanibal or karmanmonkey would know more about this stuff than me though.

ginniebean
05-09-16, 05:56 PM
I work in the mental health field. I work with people who are complex meaning they have.multiple diagnosis.

Schizophrenia, bipolar, pd's, anxiety, depression, delusions, paranoia.. autism, adhd you name it.

I like my job very much. Yes, occaisionally someone lands a punch. It happens.

I truly enjoy my work (most days)

Also, I don't think of them as "less fortunate" mostly I think of them as fun sweet clienta who I sometimes want to boot in the bum.

Unmanagable
05-09-16, 06:18 PM
I did, for over 13 years. In the vocational rehab arena as a dorm counselor/life skills instructor/recreation assistant/volunteer outreach.

I got my foot in the door by starting as p/t help in the snack bar, had no college degrees, but was told by many of the staff I needed to be out working with the students and not stuck back in the corner snack bar. So I applied and was hired.

I was initially hired as p/t temporary summer help, then it led to a f/t contract position, then led to f/t state position with full benefits.

I was often asked to create programs, etc. and get them going, but was then asked to step aside so someone with a degree could take over for the credibility scene and accreditation process. Although they were using what the non-credible individuals created much more often than not. Grrrrr

Then I spoke out about unethical stuff and my health took a rapid turn for the worse under the stress of having that administrative bullseye on my back, along with trying to go back to school, being a f/t step-mom, and the domestic diva duties that went along with all of that.

I resigned, have since regained my health in ways I never knew possible, and am now planning to offer some community workshops on the things that most helped me, like mindful eating, mindful breathing, and mindful daily movement.

I would struggle greatly with formally working within the same system that has caused me so much grief as a client/consumer as well as an employee, but gladly volunteer within those arenas on occasion.

I loved the clients and the healing connections and miss the s*** out of that daily, took a few blows through the years, witnessed heart wrenching suffering, along with daily miracles and courage I'd never witnessed before, but the things that are broken within the system are too severely broken for me to ever handle again on a daily basis.

Lloyd_
05-09-16, 07:51 PM
I work in the mental health field. I work with people who are complex meaning they have.multiple diagnosis.

Schizophrenia, bipolar, pd's, anxiety, depression, delusions, paranoia.. autism, adhd you name it.

I like my job very much. Yes, occaisionally someone lands a punch. It happens.

I truly enjoy my work (most days)

Also, I don't think of them as "less fortunate" mostly I think of them as fun sweet clienta who I sometimes want to boot in the bum.

That's really cool! What kind of college degree's do you need in order to do your type of work? A Phd?

I'm sure the clients can be quite fun to work with. :D

Lloyd_
05-09-16, 07:57 PM
I did, for over 13 years. In the vocational rehab arena as a dorm counselor/life skills instructor/recreation assistant/volunteer outreach.

I got my foot in the door by starting as p/t help in the snack bar, had no college degrees, but was told by many of the staff I needed to be out working with the students and not stuck back in the corner snack bar. So I applied and was hired.

I was initially hired as p/t temporary summer help, then it led to a f/t contract position, then led to f/t state position with full benefits.

I was often asked to create programs, etc. and get them going, but was then asked to step aside so someone with a degree could take over for the credibility scene and accreditation process. Although they were using what the non-credible individuals created much more often than not. Grrrrr

Then I spoke out about unethical stuff and my health took a rapid turn for the worse under the stress of having that administrative bullseye on my back, along with trying to go back to school, being a f/t step-mom, and the domestic diva duties that went along with all of that.

I resigned, have since regained my health in ways I never knew possible, and am now planning to offer some community workshops on the things that most helped me, like mindful eating, mindful breathing, and mindful daily movement.

I would struggle greatly with formally working within the same system that has caused me so much grief as a client/consumer as well as an employee, but gladly volunteer within those arenas on occasion.

I loved the clients and the healing connections and miss the s*** out of that daily, took a few blows through the years, witnessed heart wrenching suffering, along with daily miracles and courage I'd never witnessed before, but the things that are broken within the system are too severely broken for me to ever handle again on a daily basis.

You sound like an awesome woman, going up against the system while you had all that on your plate! :eek:

I'm not really the biggest fan of authority and neither a yes man either. Nevertheless it sounds as if it was a hell of an experience, something which would change my outlook on life in a more positive way or even more negative perhaps?

The ADD Advisor
05-10-16, 07:33 PM
I work with ADD clients—and I have ADD myself. Many clients feel more comfortable working with someone they can relate to.

Lloyd_
05-10-16, 08:28 PM
I work with ADD clients—and I have ADD myself. Many clients feel more comfortable working with someone they can relate to.

How did you get started working in your field?