View Full Version : My first day at work


Jacksper
06-01-16, 05:57 PM
Today was my first day at my new job and I am so excited! I realize how lucky this job is. I think most people would be totally miserable with this function, but I love it: I can spend the next 6 jobs doing loads of e-learning (60-80% of the time), following some trainings and workshops (10% of the time), visiting clients with colleagues to get a bit of hands-on experience (10-20% of the time) and doing some chores for the company (10% of the time). My main goal will be to become a skilled GIS-IT professional, meaning I will have to refresh some GIS skills and I will have to build a lot of IT skills. It is also my responsibility to figure out what I will have to learn exactly and how I will do it. My boss gave me a bit of a starting direction, but I will also be responsible to figure out the rest. This means that I will have to ask my colleagues which skills they use most and if they know good (online) materials to learn these.

I am a bit of an information junky, so I like this. Over the last few weeks I have spent a few dozens of hours learning programming and I find this very enjoyable; it feels like I am really learning a craft, I love the feeling that I get every few minutes of understanding a little bit more, I like that it's all (so far) very logical and if this is not immediately apparent I like the challenge of figuring out how something makes sense, or how to solve a puzzle. I guess that later it will become more challenging when I have to figure out algorithms and have to build software architectures. But I have decided to take it step-by-step, trusting that things will make sense.

My boss told me that the thing he was most anxious about is how steep my learning curve will be. Fortunately he explained that if it was not as steep as he hopes that there is still a place for me, it's just that he would like to see me go to a high level. He is investing a lot of time and money in me so it is logical that he would like to see a good return-on-investment. He also mentioned that he trusts me.

I have decided not to worry about the future, I will just do my best each day to learn as much as I can (while doing this on a pace that I can sustain). I expect to be successful. If not then I will worry about it when that happens. I think if I can stay cool and confident that I have the best chance to get forward.

Gypsy Willow
06-03-16, 12:17 PM
Today was my first day at my new job and I am so excited! I realize how lucky this job is. I think most people would be totally miserable with this function, but I love it: I can spend the next 6 jobs doing loads of e-learning (60-80% of the time), following some trainings and workshops (10% of the time), visiting clients with colleagues to get a bit of hands-on experience (10-20% of the time) and doing some chores for the company (10% of the time). My main goal will be to become a skilled GIS-IT professional, meaning I will have to refresh some GIS skills and I will have to build a lot of IT skills. It is also my responsibility to figure out what I will have to learn exactly and how I will do it. My boss gave me a bit of a starting direction, but I will also be responsible to figure out the rest. This means that I will have to ask my colleagues which skills they use most and if they know good (online) materials to learn these.

I am a bit of an information junky, so I like this. Over the last few weeks I have spent a few dozens of hours learning programming and I find this very enjoyable; it feels like I am really learning a craft, I love the feeling that I get every few minutes of understanding a little bit more, I like that it's all (so far) very logical and if this is not immediately apparent I like the challenge of figuring out how something makes sense, or how to solve a puzzle. I guess that later it will become more challenging when I have to figure out algorithms and have to build software architectures. But I have decided to take it step-by-step, trusting that things will make sense.

My boss told me that the thing he was most anxious about is how steep my learning curve will be. Fortunately he explained that if it was not as steep as he hopes that there is still a place for me, it's just that he would like to see me go to a high level. He is investing a lot of time and money in me so it is logical that he would like to see a good return-on-investment. He also mentioned that he trusts me.

I have decided not to worry about the future, I will just do my best each day to learn as much as I can (while doing this on a pace that I can sustain). I expect to be successful. If not then I will worry about it when that happens. I think if I can stay cool and confident that I have the best chance to get forward.

:thankyou:

That's the key, right there: staying at a pace we can sustain to learn properly and effectively. I started a new job about 3 weeks ago and it's fast paced, detailed work but the benefits are awesome and the work itself is super interesting. I finally had to tell my trainer, that I absorb new info one step at a time and then I can go to the next project. Once she understood that, she stopped throwing 15 things at me in a span of 5 minutes. LOL!

bluejay14
06-03-16, 04:38 PM
That sounds really positive - great that you've found something that is enjoyable and motivating for you. Good luck. I hope it works out!

Little Nut
06-03-16, 05:47 PM
GG Jack and gratz. Just a thought...For a new job and a great boss that has high expectations and gives you alot of latitude I was always concerned about a disconnect between me and my boss that could go on for a long time before it was caught and resolved. I found it helpful to have scheduled routine (say monthly) performance checks with my new boss. BRIEF AND TO THE POINT, to go over established objectives, personally added objectives, desired out comes, timetables, risks, potential problem areas. Sum it up in an email, send to boss beforehand so he/she could review if they wanted to and then go over quickly in the review. I would always solicit +/- feedback from my boss on how I was doing and offer my opinion on how I thought I was doing. Through the month I would jot down items as they occurred to make it simple to pull together the monthly notes. After a couple of meetings it always went really quick w/ the boss. Anywhooos, Congratulations, -LN

Jacksper
06-05-16, 06:29 AM
@Gypsy Nut - That is true! It is very important to not get overloaded with work/information, and if you feel like you do it's your responsibility to communicate your boundaries. During my studies I found that a lot harder then during my work, because the university does not really seem to care whether or not you are doing fine, but the company benefits from me functioning well. I have only worked for 3 days now and it is going fine, but I really notice the importance of taking good care of yourself: getting enough sleep, eating right, exercising, relaxing, etc. These things can really impact your level of focus at the workplace. So, I give them priority.

If I may ask, what is your job/role?

@bluejay - Thanks! :)

@Little Nut - That is a good thing to keep in mind. Fortunately, my boss often works at the office, where I am almost the only person (because all of my colleagues are on secondment at other companies - that is how we work), so I have a lot of opportunities to talk to him (though I am sure that this can have downsides as well). I agree with you that it is important to do this brief and to the point, I don't want to waste his time (and be seen by him wasting my own time on the job). Actually I agree with everything you say, good advice that I will apply!