View Full Version : why would there be "inattentive" when ADHD is an attention deficit?


baical
06-03-16, 05:30 AM
Are they saying one who is inattentive is twice as ADHD as just "ADHD"? Or are they being sarcastic here?

I'm confused by the term "inattentive" and why there's other types of ADHD? I would assume ADHD is ADHD and meds for ADHD is prescribed for ADHD so what difference would it make if one has a certain "type" of ADHD when one would end up being on ADHD meds regardless of ADHD "type". Explain...

ginniebean
06-03-16, 01:33 PM
All people with adhd have inattentive symptoms. People with combined type have both inattentive symptoms as well as the impulsive symptoms and some hyperactive symptoms or history of these symptoms.

ginniebean
06-03-16, 01:36 PM
I personally don't think there is or should be this big distinction of types. It's strange how people want these differences enforced.

One of the first questions asked when the inattentivr section was created was about impulsivity. Our differences are not so great and i often think the types just create divisiveness.

namazu
06-03-16, 01:40 PM
I personally don't think there is or should be this big distinction of types.

DSM-5 has done away with the official subtype distinctions. Now there's just "ADHD" -- with some specifiers for "presentation" that can change with time, but a single primary diagnostic code.

Lunacie
06-03-16, 02:05 PM
Yes, all ADHD is based on inattentiveness, with three subtypes.

A diagnosis of Primarily Hyperactive) is given when the symptoms of hyperactivity outnumber the symptoms of inattentiveness.

The diagnosis of Primarily Inattentive is given when the sypmtoms of inattention outnumber the symptoms of hyperactivity.

The diagnosis of Combined Type is given when there are equal numbers of inattention and hyperactivity.

The sub-type can change depending on other factors. I was more hyperactive as a child but grew out of some of that hyperactivity.

Impromptu_DTour
06-03-16, 02:37 PM
In times past, a lot of researchers made a lot of efforts to dissect ADHD as a single disorder, to be able to understand more objectively a disorder which for all intents and purposes was only observable because of the destruction it left behind in every day life..

there've been models where ADHD has been split into type1 and type2, where type1 was with hyperactivity (and more prone to aggressive/assertive personality traits), and type2 was without hyperactivity (and more prone to "ditzy", daydreaming behavior).

There've been models where ADHD has been split into 3 different subtypes (which is still the most commonly accepted definition): ADHD, ADHD Combined, and ADHD-pI.

There've even been models that have proposed 6 different subtypes, supposedly supported by different SPECT and fMRI scans.

I guess the new DSM has discarded the distinctions all together.. which personally I agree with Ginny, is a step forward finally. Its impossible to categorize objectively something as subjective as a disorder which is based on a set of symptoms which will be different for every individual, but require only a quantitative appraisal of how many of them are consistently problematic.

Its safe to say that ALL people have experienced TIMES where they have had problems with the symptoms.. but not consistently enough to denote a diagnosis. I feel that its also safe to say that MOST people with ADHD, have the capacity to experience all of the symptoms associated with ADHD (as problematic) depending on environmental grooming, and other situations...

I also have a feeling that different periods of a persons life can present shifting from one "subtype" to another.

In my mind, ADHD is much more of a spectrum based disorder.. some people swing predominately to being hyper, some people swing predominately to being slower.. but all can experience certain symptoms as outliers to their situation.

All of this, of course, is only my opinion.

iDTour

Cyllya
06-05-16, 01:03 AM
Are they saying one who is inattentive is twice as ADHD as just "ADHD"? Or are they being sarcastic here?

The inattentive ones aren't more inattentive or anything; they are less hyperactive.

Although the doctor who diagnosed me didn't specify a type or presentation, it's safe to say I've got the primarily inattentive presentation. I meet all 9 characteristics in the inattentive section, I have a bunch of additional problems along those lines, and they all have a horrible effect on my life. But I only have one measly trait out of the 9 hyperactive characteristics, which is that I fidget almost constantly, and this causes almost no problems. If you had to have impairing hyperactivity to by diagnosed with ADHD, people like me would be in deep trouble.

I'm confused by the term "inattentive" and why there's other types of ADHD? I would assume ADHD is ADHD and meds for ADHD is prescribed for ADHD so what difference would it make if one has a certain "type" of ADHD when one would end up being on ADHD meds regardless of ADHD "type". Explain...

Well, they stopped calling it types, but besides that...

It's helpful to distinguish the fact that two different people with ADHD could have a dramatically different symptoms. Like, it'd be weird if the diagnostic criteria just listed 18 traits and said you only have to have 6.

Although good ADHD treatment almost always requires medication, and it's the same medication for all presentations, getting medication isn't the only purpose of a diagnosis. Disability-related accommodations in work or school, or things like counseling and therapy, will differ based on your presentation.

There are some inattentive people with zero hyperactivity, and for that and others reasons, some researchers are thinking they should be diagnosed with a totally separate condition. However, that proposed condition is not an official diagnostic label, so being diagnosed with ADHD is the next best thing for those people.

sarahsweets
06-05-16, 10:38 AM
The only thing that sticks in my craw is when the topic of severity comes up. That opens a can of worms. I find that the most times severity comes up is when people start talking about subtypes. Then its an issue of which one is worse or more severe and then a you-know-what type of contest begins. Since that never helps anyone I am ok with just dealing with my own adhd and not worrying about my own, or anyone else's subtypes.

Impromptu_DTour
06-05-16, 04:48 PM
The only thing that sticks in my craw is when the topic of severity comes up. That opens a can of worms. I find that the most times severity comes up is when people start talking about subtypes...

Agreed. To say that there are people who struggle (with what was formerly known as) ADHD-pI more than others, is not necessarily UNtrue.. but its not at all accurate either. I suffer more from specific symptoms of ADHD.. than others.. and other symptoms less than others do.

Ive also learned that, at least for me, that balance of symptoms and their severities have shifted at times in my life, depending on a variety of factors and strengths bent to coping mechanisms.

Im pretty pleased at this whole 1 ADHD type thing.

baical
06-12-16, 07:11 AM
but regardless of "types", aren't doctors still going to prescribe ADHD meds regardless of subtypes? I was just wondering what the purpose of it all; I would think not to come up with different formulas of existing drugs but more for theoretic reasoning?

If someone has a youtube video that depicts what a "true" ADHD is point me to it. Does an ADHD person usually lack personal hygiene (aka lazy/spoiled to groom themselves)? I was always well groomed so I guess I'm "clean ADHD". LOL.

I know a guy who was on Ritalin as a child and now he looks like a hobo in the hygiene department, and he tends to talk to himself as if he was hearing "voices". It could be because of his early childhood Ritalin use? Or maybe he was never ADHD but something else? He is aggressive/assertive type so I would think he gets things done (the stuff that he is interested in anyway), yet his hygiene is hobo-material. Is this a sign of ADHD or perhaps he just reached middle age crisis (he is 40 something)?

I would say I'm hyperactive in my high school years but tend to daydream (my calm before the storm) so could I have 2 or 3 of the "subtypes"? So I must be the "combined type"? What could I do about this then? The meds are still JUST for ADHD, not subtype specific, although Vyvanse is also for Oppositional Defiant DIsorder (which could be linked with hyperactivity).