View Full Version : MRI AND X-Ray ?


Laserbeak
06-23-16, 12:44 AM
Isi there any sense to scheduling you for an X-Ray of the same body part (elbow) you just had an MRI done yesterday?

I'm seeing a new doctor so maybe he ordered it without realizing I have a VERY recent MRI on file, or maybe there is something an old fashioned X-Ray can show that the latest and greatest (and most expensive) MRI can't and my GP ordered it too?

I'm confused, anyone know the answer? :confused:

Thanks!

Laserbeak
06-23-16, 12:51 AM
For anyone interested this what an MRI Radiologist report looks like, it's of my old broken elbow:


History: Chronic elbow pain.

MRI of the left elbow

Technique: Multiplanar, multisequential images were obtained on a 3T scanner according to standard protocol.

Prior studies: None

Findings:

Bones/Joints: Evidence of prior radial head resection and osteochondral injury of the capitellum with broad-based full-thickness capitellar chondral loss and underlying bony defect. There is associated micrometallic debris related to prior surgery. Mild/moderate ulnohumeral chondral loss.

Flexor tendons: Intact with mild tendinosis.

Ulnar collateral ligament: Intact

Extensor tendons: Evidence of prior common extensor tendon repair with metallic artifact along the proximal course. The tendon is thickened, however appears intact.

Radial collateral ligament: limited evaluation.

Biceps tendon: Intact with mild tendinosis.

Triceps tendon: Mild insertional tendinosis.

Nerves: Mild focal thickening and increased intrasubstance signal of the ulnar nerve at the level of the cubital tunnel. The median nerve is within normal limits. Extensive low signal intensity scarring within the radiocapitellar fossa, adjacent supinator musculature, near the course of the posterior interosseous nerve.

Musculature: The visualized musculature is diffusely atrophic. Low signal intensity scarring within the supinator musculature at the level of the radial head/neck junction.

Subcutaneous tissues: Unremarkable

Impression:

Prior radial head resection and remote osteochondral injury of the capitellum.

Extensive low signal intensity scarring within the radiocapitellar fossa, supinator musculature, and near the course of the posterior interosseous nerve raising the possibility of posterior interosseous nerve injury.

Final Report: Dictated by Fellow Elisabeth Garwood MD and Signed by Attending Renata La Rocca Vieira


So that's why I take Oxycodone.

Not that much text for like a $2500 scan of my arm! At least I'm not paying!!!

Greyhound1
06-23-16, 06:50 PM
Isi there any sense to scheduling you for an X-Ray of the same body part (elbow) you just had an MRI done yesterday?

I'm seeing a new doctor so maybe he ordered it without realizing I have a VERY recent MRI on file, or maybe there is something an old fashioned X-Ray can show that the latest and greatest (and most expensive) MRI can't and my GP ordered it too?

I'm confused, anyone know the answer? :confused:

Thanks!

No, that is confusing. Usually, it's X-Ray first in order to justify MRI for insurance purposes. Let us know when you find out why they need an X-Ray just after having MRI.

Laserbeak
06-23-16, 09:16 PM
I saw the pain management doctor who likes MRIs before I saw the Orthopedist who likes X-Rays. Supposedly MRIs are better at showing soft tissues (such as nerves) than X-Rays, while the MRI isn't that great at showing bones since it shows so many other things so the Orthopedist wanted an X-Ray. Anyway, it worked out.

But the whole thing may have been a waste of time just to CYA my general practitioner who writes my Oxycodone prescriptions... Everyone i saw said to continue with medication treatment, there really wasn't anything they could do that would be better.

The only good thing is I MAY get 180 Oxycodone pills per month rather than 120. The pain management doctor said 120 5 mg tablets of Oxy was a very small dose and is talking with GP about getting it raised. The insurance company will pay for 180. Of course I could get a higher mg tablet instead.

aeon
06-23-16, 09:34 PM
When I had my CVA, i.e., stroke, they CT scanned my head and then later MRI scanned my head, and those for sure showed different things.

When I participated in that medical study about amphetamines, they gave me an intravenous preparation of dexedrine whilst I was being fMRI’d. Then they played me some songs I had indicated I liked, and then after, to my surprise, they showed me photographs of nude women, then men, and watched what my brain did.

Sex, drugs, and rock and roll in the name of science, all with fancy machines.


Right on,
Ian