View Full Version : Regaining my physical health


anonymouslyadd
07-12-16, 03:19 PM
I'll never forget when I got tendinitis in both of my ankles. The pain pulsated into the tendon and struck like a lightening bolt. It ended my running career and sent my physical health downward.

Several years later, the pain has subsided and so has much of my exercise routine. I kept up a physical therapy regimen, addressing stability issues, and was relatively faithful to it. I need help getting back on the routine.


Can I find a trainer who will use the original PT exercises that helped me overcome the tendinitis?

Are there any exercises that I can do in the mean time to help me maintain what I have?

What are the steps I need to take to begin this process?
I seek an apartment, and I guess that will impact a gym that I'm going to attend. I think I need accountability and structure, and help with restoring my confidence. I want help fusing weight training with cardio, for the ADD. I haven't been exercising for a very long time, and I've suffered because of it. I have a hard time inhibiting my impulses something exercise can help with.

Thanks for your help!

Pilgrim
07-12-16, 03:53 PM
I'm not an expert, but usually this problem arises due to instability in foot and arches. Common problem. Orthotics help.

Also running can be one of the heaviest exercises on the body. Unless your built like a runner. The more I think about it physical exercise is a must in regards to ADD. Perhaps fast walking.

salleh
07-12-16, 04:15 PM
Perhaps a local YMCA ? if they even have those anymore .....

also check out your local college, a junior college kind of place ...

anonymouslyadd
07-12-16, 04:38 PM
I'm not an expert, but usually this problem arises due to instability in foot and arches. Common problem. Orthotics help.

Also running can be one of the heaviest exercises on the body. Unless your built like a runner. The more I think about it physical exercise is a must in regards to ADD. Perhaps fast walking.
Good points, Pilgrim. I've done fast walking with a back pack with weights in it. It's helped.

Chicky75
07-12-16, 07:12 PM
[LIST=1]
Can I find a trainer who will use the original PT exercises that helped me overcome the tendinitis?


I think any good trainer would use the exercises you have in addition to others. You could try contacting the physical therapist to ask if they have recommendations of trainers. If that doesn't work, I'd suggest looking for a trainer who has a degree in kinesiology or something like that, instead of just some sort of certificate.

aeon
07-12-16, 07:50 PM
My doctor has a doctor-friend who is an orthopedist.

One time she came down to visit my doctor right at the start of my checkup.

My doctor introduced her, and I asked if I could ask her a question based on some information I had heard on BBC.

She said “Yeah, go ahead.”

And so I asked “From your point of view as a doctor, what do you think of running as a form of exercise?”

Her response:

“Running is what you do to get away from a bear.” :lol:


Lulz,
Ian

GoalieMel33
07-12-16, 08:01 PM
I'm not familiar with tendinitis but have suffered from various injuries (like swollen knees, heel pain, etc) from doing sports and physical activity. My knees were so fragile because I neglected to let them heal properly that I had to stop for more than a year.


A lot of things can help depending on the areas affected and how much it hurts. For most minor injuries, I found that applying cream (muscle rub or tiger balm), icing, compression/orthotics, glucosamine pills and stretching were the most useful. It's a good thing to focus on reducing activity instead of stopping completely.


Not sure if that applies or not but having extra weight or doind weight bearing movements (repetitive tasks like cleaning, kneeling as a gardner, etc) can increase risks to develop joint problems.

When I first injured my knee I was overweight which did contribute to the pressure that transfered to my knee when I fell. No matter what I tried to relieve it, it would always get injured again. It was frustrating.

Since I started going to the gym and shed several pounds, I was able to gain strength with weight training and now my knees are fine. I can run, bike, squat, use weight machines and do bodyweight exercises, things I never thought I would do again.


I know a lot of people who are into exercise, sometimes see chiropractor or masage therapist. A foot specialist might be needed if it's due to aligment, how pressure is distrubuted, etc.

Other professionals that could be part of the team helping you include: personal trainer (gym or independant), kinesiologist, occupational therapist (physical health). For trainers, look at their expertise. Some of them are specialized in working with clients who deal with specific issues.

The first two are more knowledgeable about physical activity while the OT can advise you with day to day living based on your current condition. Your doctor might be able to recommend someone as well.


The key points is to find someone who will understand your issues and know about your situation (tendinitis and past injuries, medical history, ADHD, what worked for you and not, your preference, amongts other things) and if you start a workout program to start slow then building up and incorporate weight training.

Knowing what you like is something to take into consideration as you'r emore likely to stick to it. Do you like group classes? Would you work better with a gym buddy or trainer?

Do you prefer the gym environment or exercising at home? How much time do you have? Would you rather work several times with shorter periods or a long session? Are you more into sports or different stuff (boxing for example)?


It's a long and tough process, but you took the first step in deciding to get into it again. I remember when I first started, I got out of breath pretty quickly and my body was aching all over. Everyone has to start somewhere.

Then I made a program and started slowly, building strength and stamina. It gets easier when it becomes a habit (Once ''I have to'' turns to ''I want to'') and you see the results. Find what motivates you.

Make that reason part of your values. It would be a lie if I said I never fall into my old pattern (especially with eating), I still do sometimes lol. But now that I saw that my hard work pays off, there is no way I'm going back to where I was again.


Sorry for the writing a novel, I get enthuasitic when it comes to fitness and such haha. Hope I was able to help somehow.

anonymouslyadd
07-13-16, 10:35 PM
I'm not familiar with tendinitis but have suffered from various injuries (like swollen knees, heel pain, etc) from doing sports and physical activity. My knees were so fragile because I neglected to let them heal properly that I had to stop for more than a year.


A lot of things can help depending on the areas affected and how much it hurts. For most minor injuries, I found that applying cream (muscle rub or tiger balm), icing, compression/orthotics, glucosamine pills and stretching were the most useful. It's a good thing to focus on reducing activity instead of stopping completely.
I was in PT twice for this issue and was prescribed orthotics. I think my situation is stable.

Not sure if that applies or not but having extra weight or doind weight bearing movements (repetitive tasks like cleaning, kneeling as a gardner, etc) can increase risks to develop joint problems.

When I first injured my knee I was overweight which did contribute to the pressure that transfered to my knee when I fell. No matter what I tried to relieve it, it would always get injured again. It was frustrating.

Since I started going to the gym and shed several pounds, I was able to gain strength with weight training and now my knees are fine. I can run, bike, squat, use weight machines and do bodyweight exercises, things I never thought I would do again.
I do not have any weight issues.
Knowing what you like is something to take into consideration as you'r emore likely to stick to it. Do you like group classes? Would you work better with a gym buddy or trainer?

Do you prefer the gym environment or exercising at home? How much time do you have? Would you rather work several times with shorter periods or a long session? Are you more into sports or different stuff (boxing for example)?
I think I need the one-on-one help. I think I need a trainer. I don't mind the gym environment and sometimes feel that it would be best for me to leave the house to workout.

Perhaps the shorter periods would be best. I've never given that much thought. I would like to try boxing again, but I don't know if I'm strong enough to handle it.
It's a long and tough process, but you took the first step in deciding to get into it again. I remember when I first started, I got out of breath pretty quickly and my body was aching all over. Everyone has to start somewhere.

Then I made a program and started slowly, building strength and stamina. It gets easier when it becomes a habit (Once ''I have to'' turns to ''I want to'') and you see the results. Find what motivates you.
Good job on getting back into it. I have a very hard time starting slowly and can often be impulsive.

Thanks for posting.

Make that reason part of your values. It would be a lie if I said I never fall into my old pattern (especially with eating), I still do sometimes lol. But now that I saw that my hard work pays off, there is no way I'm going back to where I was again.
What reason?

Unmanagable
07-14-16, 08:44 AM
Just an idea that I found works wonders for me. I have bone spurs on each heel, an extra bone growth protruding from one of my ankles, and a knee injury from a fall, along with, according to the docs, severe osteoarthritis and fibro, which makes running painful, to say the least, but this doesn't hurt a bit.

Meanwhile, if you see me running, you better run, too!!!! Hahahahaha!

A low impact mini-trampoline that you can have wherever you are might be a good start to get you back into daily gentle movement to build some momentum to venture back into the gym arena.

You can use it outside, too, and take it with you when you travel. Or simply make it a part of the decor, right next to the stereo, as I do. :)

And a huge bonus is it really helps keep the lymph fluids moving, which is very necessary for overall health.

stef
07-14-16, 09:11 AM
Hey, what about swimming? no impact!

Little Missy
07-14-16, 09:12 AM
Hey, what about swimming? no impact!

No swimming yet this summer?

stef
07-14-16, 09:18 AM
No swimming yet this summer?

for me you mean?
hopefully Sunday! the pool should be open sunday afternoons by now.

lzôits just great for your back

DJ Bill
07-14-16, 02:12 PM
What works for me is going to a local mall early in the morning before it officially opens and walking around inside for an hour along with all the other older folks. If the weather is good, I can walk around the outside of the parking lot, and go inside to cool off in the summer. I started out at 1/2 hour and now do as much as I have time for, usually an hour and a few minutes beyond. I can also walk the neighborhood but the lack of shady characters and drivers in a hurry makes it a lot less stressful.

It has done wonders for my mood also. The outside walking especially. I'd like to go back to my daily bike riding but with the hernia surgery it will have to wait a bit longer. So for now, I walk.

No gym member ship required, and lots of folks of all ages doing it along with you so you might make a friend or two to meet every day at the same time to walk.

I just picked up a small (40??lb) dumbbell set at Walmart for $17. and now am starting to work on my arms and back muscles. I am wayyyy out of shape but I can feel the difference already after a few days.

For all the above, no gym membership required.

A trainer sounds like an accountability partner - Unless you need their specialized knowledge, anyone that cares about you can do that.

Good on you for pursuing this!:yes::yes::yes:

GoalieMel33
07-14-16, 09:53 PM
What reason?

The reason that motivates you to regain physical health, if it comes from you, what you value and see as important, it will be easier to keep going (as opposed to external/extrinsic motives such as because a family member wants us to do it, etc)

anonymouslyadd
07-15-16, 08:58 PM
Hey, what about swimming? no impact!
Swimming is good, and I might be strong enough for that. I don't know.

stef
07-16-16, 01:54 AM
Swimming is good, and I might be strong enough for that. I don't know.

Im not a strong swimmer at all and I dont count lenghts or anything. im kind of uncoordinated, its the only exercise that feels pleasant to me. i might have this joint hyperflexibility thing and i can just feel the muscles in my lower back actually working in the water. its lovely and relaxing. and no one can "see "you ( as opposed to working out in a gym). i am just one of several people coming alone and quietly swimming ( there are also families and couples its super low key).

acdc01
07-18-16, 10:25 PM
Since you're getting a new apartment anyway, you could consider getting one close to a gym or somewhere where there are some nice walking trails. Distance to exercise place is an enormous factor in whether I exercise or not.

anonymouslyadd
07-18-16, 10:54 PM
Since you're getting a new apartment anyway, you could consider getting one close to a gym or somewhere where there are some nice walking trails. Distance to exercise place is an enormous factor in whether I exercise or not.
Good point. I definitely don't want to have to take a long drive to work out.

Pilgrim
07-19-16, 12:33 AM
I read something about swimming recently that I thought was interesting. With swimming you always have to be situationally aware or you will swim all over the place. I just thought this was interesting in regards to someone with ADD.