View Full Version : Adderall and Synthroid


hlowman
07-13-16, 12:14 PM
I was speaking with my dr about a weight loss drug because I am 5'9" and I weigh 266 pounds. I didn't want anything long term, just a jumpstart.

I am active. I do Zumba, exercises regularly, I eat clean but I do not see any results. When I work so hard but do not see results, I tend to stop doing the exercising and eating whatever I want. Losing weight does take time. I know that. Losing it healthy takes a lot more time than some non healthy alternatives but I want to see instant results to help me stay on track with dieting and exercising.

He suggested I try Synthroid in conjunction with Adderall. He told me that a lot of his patients saw quick results with the two together. I do not have an underactive thyroid but my bloodwork shows that I am borderline. I do not have ADHD or ADD.
I am always tired and want to sleep, but I assumed that was from exercising, full time job, full time mommy and wife and part time student.

Has anyone taken both of these together just to lose weight. It scares me to take any medication, but starting two strong medications at the same time is a little scary.

GoalieMel33
07-13-16, 01:39 PM
I'm a little surprised that your doctor would prescribe Adderall and Synthroid as weight loss aids over approved medications for the matter. Sometimes medical issues can make it harder for someone to lose weight so it's a great thing that was investigated through bloodwork.

I definitely understand the frustration of not seeing results, it happens. Stick with it and be patient, it might not show on the scale but you may notice in how you're feeling (physically and mentally), needing smaller clothing sizes, etc.

Consistency is key. Make sure you do weight training as well in adition to your cardio activities. You might need to tweak with your program on intensit or length, add interval training. For nutrition, food log can be useful. And paying attention to portions, etc.

As for the meds, I never tried any of them. But I've heard that hypothyroidism meds can sometimes cause weight gain. Adderall as well as other stimulants do reduce appetite, but that side effect could fade over time. And I don't see benefits for taking it if someone doesn't have ADHD or narcolepsy :S

It can be prescribed off label for other symptoms but it's always safer and more effective imo to try first line of treatment when it comes to meds (specific to the condition). Taking care of thyroid problems will probably help with tiredness too.

aeon
07-13-16, 03:47 PM
Exercise is good for you for many reasons, but weight loss isnít one of them.

Or so says multiple clinically-validated studies.

If you want to lose weight, you need to eat less - in particular, a caloric intake under your basal metabolic rate.

It really is just that simple.

Synthroid seems a quite drastic thing to do when you already have the freedom of choice to choose to eat less.

Dieting doesnít work, nor does eating clean.

Eating less does. It honors the laws of physics, to say nothing of biology. ;)


Cheers,
Ian

Fortune
07-13-16, 04:16 PM
Although I was just reading a thing that said that the assumption that one calorie equals one calorie of different varieties (protein, carbohydrates, and fat) actually violates the second law of thermodynamics. All calories are not created equal.

I've been losing weight over the past year, which I think is a combination of eating less and the meds I take (which, not going to list here because people shouldn't take those meds for weight loss, although synthroid is one of them - but I definitely have hypothyroid). Also less of an appetite than I used to have. I do get some exercise.

Fuzzy12
07-13-16, 06:07 PM
I'm not sure the key is eating less. It definitely works but it wreaks havoc on your mental health and it's very difficult to sustain.

What I've found works best for me is to curb my appetite and not be hungry. That makes it easier to eat less without the irritability of constantly being hungry, the tiredness or weakness.

One way to curb your hunger is to fill up on fibre. I recommend bran sticks (you can mix them into your cereals, I usually do half bran and half of a slightly more tasty cereal type) and ground flax seeds ( again I sprinkle them over my cereals). For me flax seeds keeo.me full.and more importantly energised till late in the afternoon. So if I have lunch I can make healthy choices since I'm not driven by appetite (often I just have soup and fruits and slices of dry rye bread)

Other things are drinking plenty of water and eating healthy snacks like fruits and veggies..exercise helps.me because it gets me into a healthy mind set.

Intermittent fasting is also not bad I think (and I've always found fasting a million times easier than dieting) though make sure to keep up your fibre intake so you won't get digestive problems.

Having said that I'm a huge emotional eater and then none of my strategies help. I'll eat masses of sugar and fat even when I feel sick and my stomach is hurting already.

I wouldn't go down the meds route though I might just be biased. At least I'd try to explore other avenues first. I'm not sure it's worth the side effects of meds and I think it is important to find something that you can sustain for a lifetime. Stimulants might curb your appetite and slightly rev up your metabolism but only for as long as you take them..

Fortune
07-13-16, 06:15 PM
I eat less because I crave less. I eat until I am not hungry.

Fuzzy12
07-13-16, 06:29 PM
I eat less because I crave less. I eat until I am not hungry.

Sigh that's brilliant. When I'm on a binge I crave food till I feel sick (or beyond).

Fortune
07-13-16, 06:34 PM
Sigh that's brilliant. When I'm on a binge I crave food till I feel sick (or beyond).

I think this worked out because of the meds I'm on. I just don't want as much food as I used to. I do sometimes eat too much, esp. on holidays.

Fuzzy12
07-13-16, 06:41 PM
Dex helped me too because it killed my appetite (so I ate only out of necessity) and because it helped me with emotional regulation.

Ahem...I still don't think it really helps to.kick start a diet as you run the risk that after the initial kick nothing much happens or you bounce the other way. I can relate though to the op. I absolutely thrive on instant gratification and really struggle working tuwards long term goals.

Fortune
07-13-16, 06:43 PM
I agree that dieting very rarely does any good.

I don't take any stimulants. Zoloft and Wellbutrin seem to help with my appetite and Wellbutrin can cause weight loss as a side effect. Synthroid seems to help, too, as I have more energy (although I have been really fatigued this year for reasons I do not know or understand).

stef
07-14-16, 12:36 AM
dieting is miserable
i think you need' both diet and exercise
im very "fortunate"in that anxiety makes me lose my appetite so i don't binge
I went through a very bad time winter 2015 and i lost these maybe 15-20 extra lbs inadvertanrly ( im only 5"2 and small framed so it made a visible difference) and then when iwas feeling better in spring i realized that i had been eating fairly well bur just way too much for me, for years.and felt physiclly better so i justwent with that and kept the weight off all year and i can tell now when i've had enough to eat and " extra" food i dont need doesnt appeal to me. also i have no choice but to walk at least 40 mn per day i dont have a car.

there is just so much junk food available in the first place,its awful
also i think everyone's metabolism is different.

this is just my personal expeience though! i would say eat less and more friut and vegetables and much less processed food,

aeon
07-14-16, 12:36 AM
I'm not sure the key is eating less.

Read up on the clinically-validated studies and then you will be sure.

Your body needs to utilize a certain number of calories per day. Give it less than that, and it has to use what it has on-hand.

Do that enough times in a row, and you will have lost weight, simple as that.

In fact, there is no other way to lose weight (save surgical procedures and whatnot).


Cheers,
Ian

Fuzzy12
07-14-16, 03:22 AM
Read up on the clinically-validated studies and then you will be sure.

Your body needs to utilize a certain number of calories per day. Give it less than that, and it has to use what it has on-hand.

Do that enough times in a row, and you will have lost weight, simple as that.

In fact, there is no other way to lose weight (save surgical procedures and whatnot).


Cheers,
Ian

I'm not questioning the validity of it. Far from it. If you eat nothing or very little for a period of time you will lose weight.

I just don't think that merely reducing the volume of how much you eat will lead to healthy and happy successful and longer lasting slimming down.

Fortune
07-14-16, 04:24 AM
https://nutritionj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1475-2891-3-9

It's not so simple as cutting calories. What the calories come from also matters. Also, food restriction diets don't really work. People tend to gain the weight back.

Unmanagable
07-14-16, 08:25 AM
Speaking strictly from personal experience as someone who struggled with morbid obesity (300lbs+) for most of my adult life, I actually eat more than I used to, I just eat much cleaner versions and pay much more attention to the combinations and timing of the food I eat.

I tried every diet imaginable, joined the gym a few times, tried OTC diet pills, etc., etc. None of which genuinely helped, and typically made me feel worse, either emotionally or physically. And if I did lose a little weight, it never stayed off.

Exercise can help, if you do what's best for your specific biology. Hard core workouts can often create more issues than they help, depending on the state of your innards, from what I understand. Gentle exercise can be just as effective for some, if not more so. And for those severely suffering, rest is much more important than exercise, initially.

It seems to work incredibly well for me. I've lost 110 lbs in the past year-ish. I eliminated meat, eggs, dairy, caffeine, and alcohol as an attempt to nurse my gall bladder back to health, little did I know I'd regain health and vitality that the docs had told me to never expect to regain and just learn to live with and manage through their highly suggested synthetic methods. No thanks. My body is finally clean enough to more properly absorb nutrients.

You may be seeking instant rewards in this arena, but I'm afraid instant doesn't equal healthy or sustainable. Your body and brain will likely retaliate in many unpleasant ways.

BellaVita
07-14-16, 11:15 AM
I think I've read somewhere that stress plays a way bigger role in weight than people think - and that people often focus too much on calories. (As in, thinking it's the only main reason they aren't losing weight)

I think stress affects the body in many ways.

Once you lose some of the stress you might find yourself losing some of the weight too.

aeon
07-14-16, 11:27 AM
Stress does influence how the body processes all sorts of things.

But calories, and calories alone, determine whether or not you will maintain,
lose, or gain weight.

Both biology and physics agree on this!

How you get there is up to you, and some choices are better than others
in terms of nutrient value and variety thereof.


Cheers,
Ian

BellaVita
07-14-16, 11:36 AM
I don't know, I think that since stress affects body processes it might affect how the body works with weight gain/weight loss.

There have been times where I'd eat a lot and didn't gain because I wasn't very stressed, and times when I ate normal but gained when I was stressed.

It's as if when my body is holding onto stress it holds onto fat, but when it releases the stress it lets go of weight.

None of this is scientific just my own personal experiences.

aeon
07-14-16, 01:06 PM
I don't know, I think that since stress affects body processes it might affect how the body works with weight gain/weight loss.

There have been times where I'd eat a lot and didn't gain because I wasn't very stressed, and times when I ate normal but gained when I was stressed.

It's as if when my body is holding onto stress it holds onto fat, but when it releases the stress it lets go of weight.

None of this is scientific just my own personal experiences.

Understood, and thanks for sharing that. Those experiences tell you something about your animal self, and that is invaluable.

Stress may change what your body needs, yet the rule still applies...

Eat less than it needs, and it will use what it has. Done over and over again, it will weigh less.

All kinds of things, stress included, will influence what a body needs.

But the laws of physics remain the same, and the body answers to those laws.

Medication, exertion, emotional states, and so on can all have an effect on what a body needs in a given day.

That said, eat less, and watch the weight come off!

Of course, it would do anyone well to eat a healthy, nutritious less if they are going to eat less. And be sure to include even those things that might be naughty indulgences. Just include less of them. ;)


Cheers,
Ian

Fuzzy12
07-14-16, 01:24 PM
I'm not convinced there is a linear relationship between the amount of calories you consume and the weight you put on (and vice versa). I could be wrong but I think there are individual differences in our metabolisms and body functions...eg how we process sugar.

So yes, if you consume less calories that YOUR body requires you will lose something but you don't know how much exactly your body requires. Hold on..I think that might be what you said in your previous post anyway.

Also weight isn't just fat and muscle isn't it? There is water weight, bones, etc.

aeon
07-14-16, 02:04 PM
I'm not convinced there is a linear relationship between the amount of calories you consume and the weight you put on (and vice versa). I could be wrong but I think there are individual differences in our metabolisms and body functions...eg how we process sugar.

Oh, for sure it is not linear, and yes, each and every person will differ in this way based on a number of factors. That said, the actual numbers, per person, do not vary much across a population, attributing for factors of sex, height, weight, body fat, and exertion. The science is deep and long on this.

So yes, if you consume less calories that YOUR body requires you will lose something but you don't know how much exactly your body requires. Hold on..I think that might be what you said in your previous post anyway.

Yep, exactly. And it is fairly easy to get a good idea of your BMR, or basal metabolic rate.

Also weight isn't just fat and muscle isn't it? There is water weight, bones, etc.

Of course. Water weight will fluctuate day-to-day and hour-to-hour, and is not to be worried about. Stay hydrated!

Bones, well, you can lose weight in that way, but thatís not what we are talking about here. In general, losing bone weight is a very bad thing!

Optimally, it would be good to replace fat with muscle in a state of overall anabolism while losing weight.

Losing weight in a state of catabolism means the body is breaking down all kinds of things to sustain itself, resulting in loss of fat and muscle. This is not good for many reasons, those cardiac having primacy.


Cheers,
Ian

Fortune
07-14-16, 02:13 PM
Stress does influence how the body processes all sorts of things.

But calories, and calories alone, determine whether or not you will maintain,
lose, or gain weight.

Both biology and physics agree on this!

How you get there is up to you, and some choices are better than others
in terms of nutrient value and variety thereof.


Cheers,
Ian

I posted a link that is a scientific study that said all calories aren't the same, that what you get from them matters, and that if they were the same it would violate the second law of thermodynamics. It's worth reading.

Laserbeak
07-18-16, 03:39 AM
It sounds like you are abusing both drugs:

You don't have hypothyroidism, yet you take Synthroid.

You don't have ADD/ADHD, yet take Adderall.


The Dr. prescribing these medications for you is committing malpractice and could be arrested, especially for Adderall which is a Schedule II Controlled Substance.

This sounds no different than using anabolic steroids (Schedule III Controlled Substances) to gain muscle mass.

namazu
07-18-16, 04:15 AM
It sounds like you are abusing both drugs:
You don't have hypothyroidism, yet you take Synthroid.
You don't have ADD/ADHD, yet take Adderall.

The Dr. prescribing these medications for you is committing malpractice and could be arrested, especially for Adderall which is a Schedule II Controlled Substance.
This sounds no different than using anabolic steroids (Schedule III Controlled Substances) to gain muscle mass.

Laserbeak, I'm not sure where you're getting all that...

The OP posted to inquire about these medications, which the doctor had merely talked about possibly prescribing.

The OP is hardly "abusing" anything if they haven't even been prescribed yet!

Amphetamines are sometimes prescribed off-label (and perfectly legally) as part of medical treatment for obesity and obesity-related complications. As GoalieMel mentioned above, the appetite-suppressant effects of stimulants do tend to fade, and ADHD meds aren't generally considered first-line medications in treating obesity or for weight loss (in the absence of ADHD), but they're not illegal when prescribed this way.

The OP has borderline low thyroid hormone levels.

I agree that, even if these medications were determined to be appropriate, it seems questionable to prescribe both Synthroid and Adderall at the same time -- both because of potentially increased risk of side effects, and greater difficulty figuring out which of the medications is responsible.

But to claim with any certainty that the doctor "is committing malpractice and could be arrested" seems like a stretch...

sarahsweets
07-18-16, 04:24 AM
Laserbeak, I'm not sure where you're getting all that...

The OP posted to inquire about these medications, which the doctor had merely talked about possibly prescribing.

The OP is hardly "abusing" anything if they haven't even been prescribed yet!

Amphetamines are sometimes prescribed off-label (and perfectly legally) as part of medical treatment for obesity and obesity-related complications. As GoalieMel mentioned above, the appetite-suppressant effects of stimulants do tend to fade, and ADHD meds aren't generally considered first-line medications in treating obesity or for weight loss (in the absence of ADHD), but they're not illegal when prescribed this way.

The OP has borderline low thyroid hormone levels.

I agree that, even if these medications were determined to be appropriate, it seems questionable to prescribe both Synthroid and Adderall at the same time -- both because of potentially increased risk of side effects, and greater difficulty figuring out which of the medications is responsible.

But to claim with any certainty that the doctor "is committing malpractice and could be arrested" seems like a stretch...

I also remember reading that there are some studies being done on using stimulants for treatment resistant depression.

Laserbeak
07-18-16, 05:10 AM
Laserbeak, I'm not sure where you're getting all that...

The OP posted to inquire about these medications, which the doctor had merely talked about possibly prescribing.

The OP is hardly "abusing" anything if they haven't even been prescribed yet!

Amphetamines are sometimes prescribed off-label (and perfectly legally) as part of medical treatment for obesity and obesity-related complications. As GoalieMel mentioned above, the appetite-suppressant effects of stimulants do tend to fade, and ADHD meds aren't generally considered first-line medications in treating obesity or for weight loss (in the absence of ADHD), but they're not illegal when prescribed this way.

The OP has borderline low thyroid hormone levels.

I agree that, even if these medications were determined to be appropriate, it seems questionable to prescribe both Synthroid and Adderall at the same time -- both because of potentially increased risk of side effects, and greater difficulty figuring out which of the medications is responsible.

But to claim with any certainty that the doctor "is committing malpractice and could be arrested" seems like a stretch...


I originally wrote that someone with low thyroid who takes levothyroxin (Synthroid) should have no problems taking Adderall.

But on second reading of the OP, it seems he simply wants to lose weight, and has none of the various diseases these drugs are approved for by the FDA. So at best it would be an "off-label" use; however, the DEA is really cracking down on off-label uses for controlled substances. So maybe the Synthroid would be OK, but the Adderall would definitely not be OK.

It would be like "I want a prescription for Hydromorphone (Dilaudid) because I want to feel good all the time." Obviously it's not so obvious, but, in the end, it's the same thing, an off-label use.

Laserbeak
07-18-16, 05:15 AM
Note that I'm just commenting on "the way things are" not the way I would want them to be.

Laserbeak
07-18-16, 05:20 AM
Adderalll is currently a highly controlled substance and is illegal, even for a doctor, to dispense for any reason other than a diagnosis of ADD/ADHD or narcolepsy.

Cocaine is a Schedule II Controlled Substance just like Adderall, but any doctor who wrote a prescription for someone to use it at home would lose their license. It is used only in surgical settings in certain surgical procedures.

namazu
07-18-16, 05:53 AM
Obesity is recognized as a medical diagnosis, and according to family medicine practice guidelines (http://www.aafp.org/dam/AAFP/documents/patient_care/fitness/obesity-diagnosis-management.pdf), pharmacotherapy may be considered for adults who haven't been able to lose weight through diet and exercise and whose BMI exceeds 30 (or 27 with obesity-related comorbid conditions). The OP meets these criteria.

Adderalll is currently a highly controlled substance and is illegal, even for a doctor, to dispense for any reason other than a diagnosis of ADD/ADHD or narcolepsy.
I'm pretty sure this is false (at least at the federal level -- though there may be some states with more stringent requirements). Can you cite statutes or regulations that indicate this?

From a 2013 case discussed on the DEA's website:
"In Gonzales, the Supreme Court explained that the CSA and its case law "amply support the conclusion that Congress regulates medical practice insofar as it bars doctors from using their prescription- writing powers as a means to engage in illicit drug dealing and trafficking as conventionally understood. Beyond this, however, the statute manifests no intent to regulate the practice of medicine generally." 546 U.S. at 270.
[...]
...a physician can lawfully prescribe a drug, including a controlled substance, for an off-label use as long as the physician acts in the usual course of professional practice and has a legitimate medical purpose for doing so..."

AddAnxiousMe
07-18-16, 09:00 AM
I am uniquely qualified to speak on this since I've been on Synthroid for 21 years. First for hypothyroidism, and then because of a thyroidectomy due to cancer. I can tell you that Synthroid is not a medication to mess around with, especially since they keep me on a dose that basically makes me hyperthyroid in order to suppress the chance of cancer returning. I feel sweaty/overheated a lot, have heart skips and even some chest pain. I also have hand tremors. I've recently been put on a stimulant for ADD and find it difficult to mix the two meds, even with a relatively low dose of stimulant. It is a tricky thing to mix both and you need to watch your BP and heart rate. I usually need to take Inderal with the mix in order to control the fast/irregular heart beat and nervousness it causes.
Synthroid can be a blessing when given in the right dosage for hypothyroidism, but when given in excessive amounts, it can make life miserable.
I don't know what dose of Synthroid or Adderall the OP takes (if any), but please be careful, you don't want a heart attack.

Laserbeak
07-18-16, 04:22 PM
It's a murky topic, certainly not one I want to get into a fight over. But at least the OP doesn't have anything to worry about, only, perhaps, the prescribing doctor.

klegirl3
08-23-16, 07:06 AM
He suggested I try Synthroid in conjunction with Adderall. He told me that a lot of his patients saw quick results with the two together. I do not have an underactive thyroid but my bloodwork shows that I am borderline. I do not have ADHD or ADD.
I am always tired and want to sleep, but I assumed that was from exercising, full time job, full time mommy and wife and part time student.

I'm somewhat amazed your doc would prescribe a controlled substance so freely. It's an act of Congress half the time to just get the dang prescription filled month to month. I'm ADHD taking 25 MG a day. It's actually lower than a normal dosage from my understanding. I don't like taking anything, but I needed to take the edge off my wandering brain. I'm a log truck driver, so I need to stay focused. :D I'm still my happy go lucky, somewhat hyper self & I'm able to function with minimal "squirrel!" moments. See wandering brain?!?! So to answer your question.... Did you by chance read your medical chart after the office visit? Maybe glance at the screen as they were entering the diagnosis? Sometimes they'll enter a bunch of crap without your knowledge. Maybe with your symptoms of being fatigue feeling all the time; it puts you in that narcolepsy bracket? I'd be asking a lot of questions.

A low dosage of Levothyroxine may help with some weight loss. I wouldn't put too much stock on that though. I'm on 112 MCG & along with the Adderall; I'm not really losing or maintaining. Maybe when I first started Adderall it helped with that. Over time you're body will form a tolerance to it. Like anything, you'll be increasing the dosage. You don't want to do that. Lowest dosage possible in my opinion is key. They tried putting me on a higher dosage a few years ago. Let's just say I was showing signs of being a "legal" tweaker. Sleep was non existent & I really had an urge to work on my car at 0200. a Not to mention the twitching feeling. No thanks!

However, I have incorporated Plexus TriPlex Combo into my every day life. It was introduced to me by a co worker back in February. It's a cleanse of sorts. The Plexus Slim drink alone lowered my thyroid numbers. I know it also helped with my blood pressure. It's supposed to also help with blood sugar & cholesterol. I started at 245 lbs & I'm down to 207 lbs. Not a quick loss by any means. You already have the foundation of making better food choices covered, so this may be an option. I was ordering it from my co-worker, but it was getting pretty spendy. I do better buying it off eBay from one of the wholesalers. I'm able to get two months for the price of one that way.

Well hopefully my ramblings made sense. If anything it entertained you maybe. Good luck!