View Full Version : Anyone follow religion or belief?


NateDEEzy
07-16-16, 03:00 PM
Is anyone here a REALLY devout follower of a religion or belief? If so, has it helped you at all with your ADHD PI?

WheresMyMind
07-21-16, 10:33 PM
Is anyone here a REALLY devout follower of a religion or belief? If so, has it helped you at all with your ADHD PI?

Not devout...sort of considered it. Finding some external source so that I can follow all their rules seemed like it would make life very simple. But it also felt like cheating.

I have attended services at institutions of many faiths. I have read "this religion 101" texts to understand the liturgy and philosophy. I see common themes...and huge variations.

One variation: Some religions claim that they know the only Truth, there can be no other Truth. These religions all proselytize....let's face it, unless you believe your answer is the only correct one, you could not feel ethical about believing everybody should accept your views!

Another variation: confusing "spirituality" with "mysticism". Until about 1500 years ago, "spirituality" was the seeking of your true self, "as seen by God". The phrase "as seen by God" means you have identified who you are without any filtering, interpreting, etc...it's an accurate view. And, once you know who you are, you know what your highest contribution to mankind is, and you know it's unique to you. Somewhere around year 500AD, a transition occurred wherein it was said you were looking for "God inside you" and the notion of a "personal relationship with God" came about...but that notion would demand we all have the same purpose. Quite a switch from individualism.

In my life, I have seen more noble acts done by individuals than groups or societies, and I have seen more growth and positive change done when there are guidelines, not rules, and people are allowed to do things that maximize the use of their talents.

As such, I prefer faiths that are open-minded, allow that each person is supposed to approach it differently, and do not proselytize. As someone once said "To be a light unto other nations does not mean go out and convince people to follow us. It means to live such obviously good and happy lives that people willingly ask us to lead the way." In other words, be a faith of attraction, not conversion.

Now, having seen the light of day in seven decades, I view a person's search as being, by necessity, undertaken in levels of spiritual ascendance. I would not say I'm religious, but I am spiritual. I don't think I could have become spiritual if I had not tried religion first, though.

Spirituality, as taken from its origins in Hindu (the oldest writings on the topic), is keenly focused on separating "reality" from our views. A great author on this topic is Anthony de Mello, who writes "We do not see people as they are. We see people as we are." Until you are wise enough, you cannot tell whether your interpretations of the world are accurate - because you see everything through all the messages you have received throughout your lifetime, from organized relig...er...education, to your parents, to your own self-talk.

If you can find Anthony de Mello's book "Awareness", it's a fairly comprehensive intro. Even better, if you can borrow the approximately 8-hour audio book which is the recording of his seminar that led to the book, it's better. The audio contains added quips, interaction with the audience, that, to me, really helped enhance the messages and what was important. The whole thing is repetitive, because it has to be. There is no logical way to go from what you think to Enlightenment...you have to simply be exposed to Enlightenment (a more proper interpretation of the Hebrew word that the Romans translated to "righteousness") and let it wash over you and you begin to understand it - and your role in it.

Becoming aware, or enlightened, or whatever you want to call it doesn't mean you'll lead a different life. But it does mean you'll see things more clearly, be more confident in your decisions and probably make better ones and yes...never feel emotional pain again.

I encourage you to go on this journey...it is mind-boggling, mind-expanding, and can lead to an amazing inner peace.


If you want a quick little intro, try Deepak Chopra's "Seven Spiritual Laws of Success", which is a short little paperback...and probably can be found on the 'net in PDF form.

C15H25N3O
07-22-16, 04:57 AM
Following a religion is similar like following science as science is modern religion.

both try to explain human being but are often wrong.

Religion and science can not heal adhd.

I think it is better to listen to your heart, your mind, yourself and enjoy life.

Fuzzy12
07-22-16, 05:41 AM
Following a religion is similar like following science as science is modern religion.

both try to explain human being but are often wrong.

Religion and science can not heal adhd.

I think it is better to listen to your heart, your mind, yourself and enjoy life.

Apologies for going off on a tangent nate but I really want to reply to this.

Yes, both religion and science try to explain human beings (and everything else) and both are often wrong but there is a fundamental difference between science and religion.

Science neither claims nor requires to never be wrong. In fact the scientific method takes into account that everything that science comes up with csn be wrong and that facts are only true till they are disproven. The scientific method inherently involves checking and rechecking it's facts and changing it's tenets when new evidence comes to light. For me that's the beauty of science, this constant self critical feedback loop.

Also at the moment science can't heal adhd but if it's a cure that you are looking for then science is your best bet and there is no reason why in the future a cure for adhd cannot be found.

stef
07-22-16, 06:04 AM
I was very devout as a little girl, in the religion I was raised in;
but i twisted it all around against me and for example would think I was "bad" for daydreaming through the service. (no adult ever said this to me, I just inferred it).

Religion can be a source of comfort and solace, to anyone, so it can be of great help but it can't "cure" adhd.

C15H25N3O
07-22-16, 06:12 AM
true. science has the potential to really compensate adhd one day but until this happens we have to listen to ourselves as science is not individual.

science maybe can measure neurochemics on day but our personalities depend on different chemical levels which are not scientific determinable with limits.

thats why I think it depends most on ourselves.

I dont think daydreaming is bad. it is wonderful.

Unmanagable
07-22-16, 07:37 AM
I was raised and programmed to be a devout believer in a being outside of myself that will supposedly make everything alright if I just pray enough, believe enough, behave enough, think all of the right thoughts, etc.

And I was always taught to just, "Let go and let _____ take care of your worries." Well, after a lifetime of struggling like a mofo, no matter how deeply I believed in all of the above and practiced it just as was expected, I had to finally seriously dive deep within and ask, "How's that working for ya'?"

I luckily, and finally, realized the depths of the damage it was doing to me in trying to live up to yet another external standard set into place to supposedly help me get to know myself and be where I need to be.

But, it just hit me that it was all put into place and was being enforced by a bunch of folks who didn't know themselves at all, they were just parroting the words and following behind the beliefs of others, too, because that's how all the good little boys and girls followed the script, as it was taught to us in the never ending cycle-path of religion.

Now I follow the beat of my own drum (heart) and have found more peace within than I thought was ever possible. Better symptom management being one of the greatest discoveries in the overall journey. Healthily releasing the feelings of never feeling like I can live up to the expectations of others, especially based heavily on texts and beliefs.........absolutely priceless.

Twiggy
07-22-16, 06:49 PM
Even as a child I never believed in any religion/spiritual things. I really tried to believe in something, but never succeeded.

Impromptu_DTour
07-22-16, 07:20 PM
Im postponing watching an episode of Mr. Robot to reply to this.. which is keeping me from cleaning my house, until i watch my episode of Mr. Robot.. but the draw is too tempting. :D I have a complex feeling on this, and i want to apologize at the start here for the magnitude of my thoughts that follow. This whole Science, Religion, Spirituality thing has been a very important aspect of my life.. i dunno.. helps me to put stuff into words, even if for my own therapy. Everything is of course not meant to offend, nor define any "correct" or "incorrect" perspective.. (Religion is always a stupid sensitive subject like that). Sharing is caring and all that, yea?

I was born and raised in a home which was the cornerstone of our community, every Sunday my father would bring me with him while he ministered in churches across several townships (we were pretty rural). Life was simple, until we had our own family problems where my father chose family over image, and did things as best as he could in line with his faith.

The community which he led, wept with, mourned with and celebrated their victories with; whose children he married, sisters fathers brothers and mothers he buried, whose family destroying secrets he kept in confidence.. (for all intents and purposes) burned us alive because they were not able to do the same for us when we needed them as "family" members. We lost everything, not that we had much. We were exiled with little deliberation.

For a child, with a behavioral and developmental disability, growing up through this, my perspectives on many aspects of the human condition, social and emotional ties and trusts, authority, were gravely challenged. My acceptance of my faith was absolute, but my faith in humanity was crippled. Course it didnt help that not only was my father a Reverend, but also a very accomplished Psychologist. So the tools that I personally had growing up, were very powerful... served me ridiculously well but that also might not have been the greatest power for a child my age still developing.

These are aspects of the power of ADHD that neither science nor religion will ever be able to "cure" or "heal". Just like how you cant "heal" a mountain after a river has carved its way through it.. not unless you want to chance to try and rebuild the mountain. I'll watch the youtube video when you post it, but im not going to hold my breath. In my humble opinion, the only "cure" for ADHD will be to circumvent the developmental aspects of the disorder before they take root and affect the personality and the ego, and work to modify the behaviors and nurture a deep emotional intelligence and sense of personal accountability, and develop strategies and mechanisms to mask the neuropsychological developments that managed to sneak through (I want to also focus on ADHD, not as the learning disability.. whole different can of worms). I mean.. we're talking "cure".. lets be realistic though - lol

I have a poor experience with "Religion", but because of how I have shifted the seat of the place that I feel my comforts, I understand that the Reality and the Universe that I am in, is different than all of the infinite number of universes that anyone else is in.. what doesnt "work" for me, doesnt mean that it wont work or isnt working for anybody else and is any less important in that reality that they are in. But (for me) it also doesnt mean that in their reality, the truths that are absolute to them.. cannot be true.. thats a universe that i dont reside in, and the rules of my universe have no bearing in theirs. My choice to reside in any single one of those realities, influences of thought, or acceptance of perspectives, is the result of my choice to either shift towards that influence, shift away from that influence, or to not shift at all.

To pull it back to something a bit less.. uh.. "woo-woo".. for me with my ADHD.. (for me), it serves me no benefit to relinquish my Locus of Control to external forces. I am the only one who should be held accountable for my actions or (in the case of my inattentiveness) my lack of action. The depth of my nurturing in Theology and Psychology and my life experiences prevent me from being a "Yes man" to anybody but myself. My understanding of ADHD as a behavioral and developmental disorder, presents an understanding that I am the only one who is going to change my path, and I am the only one who truthfully has the right to suffer to do that. If i dont have that ownership, and that right to fail, or if i dont suffer to change.. then my behaviors and developments will remain the same, like taking off a cast on a broken limb too early; i have no chance to succeed.

Truth is, i came to a place almost a decade ago where all of the truths that I had grown up with, and what i should expect from the moral and ethical compass that i had become tuned to, did not match the truths that I was being presented, because of the place that my moral and ethical compass led me. Everything was a lie, and every belief system I held to be true, and to be foundational to my core being and my development, was also a crippling illusion and false, i was destroyed. A timid child hiding in a wicker hut, in a hurricane. HUGE internal crisis, and pretty much had to rebuild very crucial aspects of how to understand how to relate to humanity, self and society, and not hate everyone in the process. Needless to say, im not the same person i once was.. but im still here.. and not lieing to myself about it. What i can say from that experience.. is without that philosophical structure, that psycho/emotive development... my ADHD was literally hurling me down into a catacomb of depression, and i became Psychotic. This is a big part about why i feel so strongly about the strength and quality of the development of the emotional and social self of a child, when it comes to having the tools later on in life to help manage the symptoms of ADHD.

While Science seeks to define by current and available observations, the reality that we live in.. in no way is it infallible. Religion in my experience has sought to dictate what our reality should be, infallibly, with no compromises.. whereas Spirituality is a place where we can find harmony to reside in the reality that we are in, and find peace with ourselves, when our reality is wrought with fallacy. Moreso who we are in response to the reality we are presently in.

Buuutt.. Thats me. To me thats the beauty of Spirituality.. it means what it does to us on an individual level, because it helps us define something about ourselves which is undefinable.. and even that is going to vary from individual to individual, the boundary between Spirituality and Religion (or for some, even Science) is going to be more grey than with others.. i remember i was in a writing class, and our instructor wanted to challenge us. So he put us into groups and wanted us to (as a group), come up with a definition of "Spirituality", understanding how treacherous and dynamic that could be considering all of the different people. The group was wavering and getting caught up in needing to make sure that they were representing their specific doctrines, and not betraying the notion of absolute proprietary correctness.. which no doubt is what the instructor wanted.. So i stepped in and I asked some questions and nursed the group along to something generic enough that everyone felt represented, but still felt that it defined what they felt important:

Spirituality - A deep and inspiring connection that serves to define our special identity through personal accountabilities and faiths, rooted in our individual locus of control.

I dunno.. its important.. its all important. Its a very significant aspect of our psyche that people often try and explain away as irrelevant. It doesnt matter if you are an Atheist, Christian, Pastafarian, or from any other wide range of eclectic systems. That "place", whatever that place is defined as to us on a personal and even subconscious level, is our personal batcave where we go to arm ourselves to defend ourselves against crimes on an internal level. I dont think "healing" adhd from that place is an option, but i feel that some powerful tools can be developed there.

sorry for the rant! all my own personal swing on things... ima watch some Mr. Robot now.

iDTour

BellaVita
07-22-16, 08:27 PM
I'm not sure what I actually am....but I'm quite a spiritual person and open-minded. It helps my mood and keeps my mind entertained.

I feel things deeply.

I like exploring things mentally.

Stev'o
08-05-16, 12:53 PM
Religion to me, has never made sense. Or seemed logical.
As a young person, going to church, I always had a hard time fathoming stories like the arc.
Growing up, I tried to reason where my beliefs really fell.
Finally, after reading the bible, really reading it, line a text book, or paper, trying to make sense of it. After extensive researching, I discovered that there are way too many inconsistencies, lack of any historical or scientific basis, I can happily say I am an atheist.
If you do not believe in Zeuss, or Thor, Osiris... You are atheist as well. What evidence supports one God over another?
So with this, I apologize if I have offended anyone. This is my findings, my approach to this topic. And, my moral compass is good. I am not intolerant toward any group, nationality, belief. There are no other race of people. We are all human.

WheresMyMind
08-05-16, 03:27 PM
Is anyone here a REALLY devout follower of a religion or belief? If so, has it helped you at all with your ADHD PI?
Devout has so many meanings.

To a fundamentalist, it means figuring out what you think the rules are and following them without fail, year after year.

To a priest, bishop or other higher-up, it means doing the best to understand the beliefs today, and building on them year by year, tossing away the ones that you think have been superceded by your better higher-level understanding.

For reasons of community, I am an approximate follower of a set of beliefs and traditions from an old religion. There's a community to join, we are pals and do things. When I find myself overwhelmed by choices, I contemplate the more rigid rules that I'm not following, find some wisdom in one of them, and for just this one time, use that as the reason to choose.

On a deeper level, I have evolved out of religion and am growing in spirituality - the knowledge of self, as created by whoever did all this, and the abandonment of material attachments. It has helped immensely, when I find the need to "stop worrying about it".

WMM

Little Missy
08-05-16, 03:35 PM
I believe that most people have it within them.

Fuzzy12
08-05-16, 06:27 PM
I believe that most people have it within them.

Have what in them? A desire to believe? Maybe. I guess it must be reassuring to have something to hold on to, something to give your life a meaning and an anchor but I don't think that's a reason to believe in anything...it doesn't make anything true.

I really, really dislike the whole concept of religion, of faith. What's the point of being human and having such advanced.cognitive functions, the capability to reason and think to then just give them up for the sake of faith?

Little Missy
08-05-16, 06:47 PM
Have what in them? A desire to believe? Maybe. I guess it must be reassuring to have something to hold on to, something to give your life a meaning and an anchor but I don't think that's a reason to believe in anything...it doesn't make anything true.

I really, really dislike the whole concept of religion, of faith. What's the point of being human and having such advanced.cognitive functions, the capability to reason and think to then just give them up for the sake of faith?

In their soul. Good and evil. Right and wrong. Whatever there may or not be.

Just stuff. Who knows? :)

Lunacie
08-05-16, 07:53 PM
Have what in them? A desire to believe? Maybe. I guess it must be reassuring to have something to hold on to, something to give your life a meaning and an anchor but I don't think that's a reason to believe in anything...it doesn't make anything true.

I really, really dislike the whole concept of religion, of faith. What's the point of being human and having such advanced.cognitive functions, the capability to reason and think to then just give them up for the sake of faith?

Not all religion is based on faith in what someone else says they experienced.

Many of the Pagan faiths (Wicca for example) are based on personal experience ... you only believe in what you experience for yourself.

aeon
08-05-16, 07:54 PM
I am not a man of faith. I am a reasonable man.

Inasmuch as I reserve room for doubt in such matters, I am agnostic.
I donít know one way or the other, and I am not going to lie and say I do.

But I do believe in the redemptive power of love, and that after all else fails, love remains.

omnia vincit amor

It is the light when all other lights have gone out.

Beyond that, let me wonder and worship in nature and at the altar of a womanís body.

If that makes me a godless heathen, thatís what it makes me.


Blessťd Be,
Ian

Little Missy
08-05-16, 08:34 PM
In their soul. Good and evil. Right and wrong. Whatever there may or not be.

Just stuff. Who knows? :)

Like Uncle Hub's speech.

Like what aeon wrote.

Like Ragu, "it's in there."

I believe that I have something very, very strong in my soul.

bryanrc51
08-10-16, 11:00 AM
Is anyone here a REALLY devout follower of a religion or belief? If so, has it helped you at all with your ADHD PI?

I do believe in a higher power, even when you look at it scientifically there has to be one as science simply cannot explain everything there is also that last gap that is left unanswered. Guess that isn't really belief or is it?

stef
08-10-16, 01:34 PM
i cant believe in nothing
But i cant believe in a specific religion, either

peripatetic
08-10-16, 02:35 PM
thread closed for review

Greyhound1
08-10-16, 10:59 PM
Thread re-opened after review. Please stay on topic about religion and has it helped with ADHD. Thanks

Hermus
08-11-16, 05:43 AM
Personally I'm somewhat of a follower of the Buddhist teacher Thich Nhat Hanh. Although it's at times very difficult to really practice his teachings, they are very inspirational. Especially following the five mindfulness trainings could be very beneficial in the case of ADHD I believe. They are based on the five precepts that were thought by the Buddha. Moreover, meditation helps a great deal in getting your mind calm and focused.

The Five Mindfulness Trainings (http://www.printfriendly.com/print/?source=homepage&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wkup.org%2Fabout%2Ffive-mindfulness-trainings%2F)

Strict Buddhists would say Buddhism is not a religion or a belief by the way, but I think it has a lot in common with religion.

Fuzzy12
08-11-16, 10:27 AM
I also think that yoga and mindfulness can be hugely beneficial to anyone, adhd or not.

I struggle to do mindfulness exercises on my own but when i did a course and had someone to talk me through them it was brilliant. I've never felt so rested and relaxed like I did in those classes.

Fuzzy12
08-11-16, 10:32 AM
Personally I'm somewhat of a follower of the Buddhist teacher Thich Nhat Hanh. Although it's at times very difficult to really practice his teachings, they are very inspirational. Especially following the five mindfulness trainings could be very beneficial in the case of ADHD I believe. They are based on the five precepts that were thought by the Buddha. Moreover, meditation helps a great deal in getting your mind calm and focused.

The Five Mindfulness Trainings (http://www.printfriendly.com/print/?source=homepage&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wkup.org%2Fabout%2Ffive-mindfulness-trainings%2F)

Strict Buddhists would say Buddhism is not a religion or a belief by the way, but I think it has a lot in common with religion.

I'm guessing Buddhism is similar to Hinduism in that it is more of a collection of philosophies and a way of looking at and explaining life. Theoretically you could be an atheist hindu though i don't really believe in the theories such as reincarnation, nirvana or karma either.

bryanrc51
08-11-16, 10:57 AM
Personally I'm somewhat of a follower of the Buddhist teacher Thich Nhat Hanh. Although it's at times very difficult to really practice his teachings, they are very inspirational. Especially following the five mindfulness trainings could be very beneficial in the case of ADHD I believe. They are based on the five precepts that were thought by the Buddha. Moreover, meditation helps a great deal in getting your mind calm and focused.

The Five Mindfulness Trainings (http://www.printfriendly.com/print/?source=homepage&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wkup.org%2Fabout%2Ffive-mindfulness-trainings%2F)

Strict Buddhists would say Buddhism is not a religion or a belief by the way, but I think it has a lot in common with religion.

Perhaps the best religion is the one that is not religion.

Rockkso
08-11-16, 04:09 PM
I'm an atheist personally but I don't mock or look down on people with religious beliefs. Everyone needs to find meaning and peace in their own way and if religion does that for you, that's great.

Using faith to help cope with ADHD is great if that works for people. My only caution is to remember the key phrase help cope. It should augment, not replace, the scientific approaches to treating ADHD.

julialouise
08-17-16, 05:37 PM
It's hard for me to stick with a practice because I think that there is so much out there, and so much uncertainty around it. I grew up in a Roman Catholic environment, but neither of my parents were very devout, and I stopped believing in the Catholic faith by the time I was in 6th grade when I became an atheist. Since then, though, I've gone from religion-hating to an agnostic atheist to a person interested in Buddhism to the witch that I'm learning to be now. But even still, I've been wary about picking up Witchcraft because I feel like I won't be able to keep up with it and the rituals involved or the time and effort that it takes to prepare for a ritual. But I think that this spiritual step is essential for me at this time in my life, so we'll see how it goes. I'm looking forward to see how it will help me find a sort of Center to my self, by bringing me back to nature, finding my place within the stars, and the meditations and rituals that I will do to help me in the areas of my life that need work. Only good spells, nothing harmful! I know witchcraft is met with a lot of skepticism, even by myself, but honestly who cares lol

Lunacie
08-17-16, 06:32 PM
It's hard for me to stick with a practice because I think that there is so much out there, and so much uncertainty around it. I grew up in a Roman Catholic environment, but neither of my parents were very devout, and I stopped believing in the Catholic faith by the time I was in 6th grade when I became an atheist. Since then, though, I've gone from religion-hating to an agnostic atheist to a person interested in Buddhism to the witch that I'm learning to be now. But even still, I've been wary about picking up Witchcraft because I feel like I won't be able to keep up with it and the rituals involved or the time and effort that it takes to prepare for a ritual. But I think that this spiritual step is essential for me at this time in my life, so we'll see how it goes. I'm looking forward to see how it will help me find a sort of Center to my self, by bringing me back to nature, finding my place within the stars, and the meditations and rituals that I will do to help me in the areas of my life that need work. Only good spells, nothing harmful! I know witchcraft is met with a lot of skepticism, even by myself, but honestly who cares lol

A ritual can be as simple as saying hello or good morning to any gods you honor, to your ancestors spirits, to the four elements, or just taking three deep breaths in and out and then stating or thinking of your plans for the day.

You can include lighting candles and incense if you want. Or you can go full-on traditional and celebrate the changing seasons by casting a circle, burning incense, chanting or drumming or just meditating. You make it happen when you want or need to, and make it as simple or complicated as you want it to be.

Kunga Dorji
03-24-17, 12:29 PM
Yes.
To be brief: Buddhist- Tibetan.
I have taken refuge and taken a number of trainings / empowerments.
Buddhism is a subtle thing, and if you look the right way no rigid beliefs are required- ie you can see ideas like re-incarnation as metaphors, if that is what works for you.

However three core beliefs stand out- the belief in cause and effect (karma), the understanding that our suffering is caused by inadequate attention to the nature of reality (and what ADHD person has not suffered due to inattention to reality??), and finally the idea that one major feature of meditation is training in the ability to pay unbroken attention to a given target for extended periods of time. This form of meditation is called Shamatha (calm abiding) and it really does directly address one of the core problems in ADHD.

We (rightly) see ADHD as a brain disorder- but the real message to be taken home from the knowledge we have about mindfulness and the brain (and that knowledge is almost entirely due to the contributions of Buddhist psychologists and Buddhist Monks who were test subjects for brain imaging studies) is that brains are plastic- and ongoing mindfulness practice will re-shape the brain.

In the end I have found that following the more mystical aspects of this path (even though I do not know that they are really true) is helpful to me- and it helps me learn more, faster.

dvdnvwls
03-24-17, 02:40 PM
I think, despite what people may believe or claim, that all religion is primarily a means of socialization, and that the religious beliefs are always secondary (in every way) to the social bonds created.

I think that religion can make a major positive difference in ADHD by providing a mutually supportive environment, or a major negative difference by providing a judgmental alienating environment.

Greyhound1
03-24-17, 07:25 PM
***Mod. Note***
Please be mindful of the guidelines for this section. This section is for sharing experiences about how meditation and spirituality have helped with ADHD and or other disorders. Please refrain from debating or critiquing religion in this section. Below is a link to the guidelines for this section.
http://www.addforums.com/forums/showpost.php?p=353347&postcount=1

Thanks
Hound

midnightstar
03-25-17, 05:29 AM
Mod Note: Thread closed temporarily for mod review, when this thread reopens please keep this thread about beliefs and ADHD. Thanks from your local friendly moderating team :)

Kunga Dorji
06-09-17, 09:38 PM
Is anyone here a REALLY devout follower of a religion or belief? If so, has it helped you at all with your ADHD PI?

One other comment I would make is that various schools of Buddhism are extremely good at coming up with short and pithy slogans and stories which illustrate important aspects of practice.

While theoretically the aim of Buddhism is to progress towards enlightenment and stay on the path despite death and reincarnation, in practice it is all about your day to day conduct.

Techniques such as Lojong mind training impart very simple, short comments that, over time, will help you move towards being a kinder, more stable person. Because they are short they stay with you more easily than longer and more complex texts.

The whole emphasis is towards becoming calmer, less aggressive and developing more stable attention.

This last point is critical- because at a certain point we need to put the diagnosis of ADHD aside and look closely at what we can do to improve our attentional functioning ourselves.

Emre22
06-28-17, 11:51 AM
I was an atheist between between 12-21 years age ( before that i never had a strong belief because my parents werent conservative and they didnt prefer to teach anything religious at my childhood)

my thoughts about destiny have changed this , and i tried pray and have faith in a Creator/God

but i think it is better for me to not believe in anything

when u have hope and faith , disappointment hurts more than source of disappointment

so i am an ahteist again after a short break , being religious would keep person a motivated but not for me because when i cant see it's possitive effect in my life it disappoints me

Kunga Dorji
07-03-17, 03:30 AM
Is there any proof it works ? Comparing to any sports, which obviously makes me more calmer,
less agressive and gives me more stable attention.
Is it worth trying ?

People practicing it as a path or faith are not concerned with developing a proof, but with following the practice.

However there has been a good deal of study of people who are experienced meditators using various neuroimaging techniques.
We do know that people who do a lot of meditation generally have a lower level of default mode network activity, and the research on meditation has shown measurable changes in as little as 6 weeks of 20 minutes twice a day, with weekly instruction.

From my own position, and I have done a moderate amount but been disrupted by a hypomanic episode last year (the meditation could not stop that), I am sure that it does make a difference, and I am sure that doing the meditation within the ethical framework of Buddhism works better- as it balances the practice with a solid and straightforward background for action.
I had about 18 months off meditation after the big drama- but I find it easy to settle in to now, and enjoyable.

namazu
07-03-17, 06:45 AM
MODERATOR NOTE: The thread's OP asked for the personal stories/experiences of members with devout faith, and whether that faith has helped them with their ADHD-PI.

Please stay on topic. Off-topic posts may be removed and infractions may be issued.

stef
07-03-17, 06:52 AM
I used to be devoutly religious, but it actually didnt help, because this became superstitious about the religion.

I think though, a faith in which one believes in a healthy way (not feeling associated guilt and shame) , could be of great solace.

trmdd1
07-05-17, 01:18 AM
My parents forced a false religion on me when I was a kid, and were very strict about it. I think it may be one of the major factors in what caused my depression and lack of social development