View Full Version : Is a healthy attachment relationship a "tool" to treat ADHD?


mildadhd
07-17-16, 12:31 PM
This thread is meant to explore specifically a question/topic brought up several times in a different thread discussion.

I am asking the specific question here as to not derail the other opening post thread topic.

In your opinion, is a healthy attachment relationship with at least one aware primary care-giver a "tool" to help treat ADHD and help improve the lives of children suffering from ADHD?



m

Pilgrim
07-17-16, 03:52 PM
I'm not sure if I've answered correctly but I'll give my version. Although both my parents are ADD and I don't have a great relationship with either.

An aunt of mine, who by chance was a psychologist, a high IQ, she didn't understand ADD, I think she saw it in a number of forms for many years.

Her support has been invaluable to me.

aeon
07-17-16, 05:06 PM
In your opinion, is a healthy attachment relationship with at least one aware primary care-giver a "tool" to help treat ADHD and help improve the lives of children suffering from ADHD?

In my opinion, no, absolutely not, and to even think of it that way is to do it the greatest of disrespects.

It is much, much more than that. To call it as such denotes a misunderstanding of what it is.


Cheers,
Ian

Lunacie
07-17-16, 05:08 PM
In my opinion, no, absolutely not, and to even think of it that way is to do it the greatest of disrespects.

It is much, much more than that. To call it as such denotes a misunderstanding of what it is.


Cheers,
Ian

That's pretty much what I just posted on Mildadhd's other thread.

I think that a good parent/child relationship is a need and just as important as food and shelter. Too bad society is so slow to realize this is true.

Fortune
07-17-16, 05:50 PM
Poor attachment will make everything worse so attachment is important for what it does for a child's development. It doesn't specifically cause ADHD, however, and good attachment doesn't mean that ADHD will be milder.

mildadhd
07-17-16, 09:04 PM
Similar to children born with a more homeostatically sensitive diabetic temperament, will require more specific nutritional needs, than normal.

Children born with a more emotionally sensitive ADHD temperament, will require more specific attachment relationship needs, than normal.




m

mildadhd
07-17-16, 09:26 PM
Children born with a more sensorially sensitive temperament, will require more specific sensory needs, than normal.



m

Lunacie
07-17-16, 09:28 PM
Similar to children born with a more homeostatically sensitive diabetic temperament, will require more specific nutritional needs, than normal.

Children born with a more emotionally sensitive ADHD temperament, will require more specific attachment relationship needs, than normal.




m

And parents can hopefully provide those specific needs ... once the child has been diagnosed and the needs are known.

Which is generally around 4 years old or later.

mildadhd
07-17-16, 10:19 PM
And parents can hopefully provide those specific needs ... once the child has been diagnosed and the needs are known.

Which is generally around 4 years old or later.



My parents knew I had a more sensitive temperament than my brother, beginning early in my infancy.

I think next week I might create a thread discussion to learn more about more sensitive temperaments, before severity of ADHD becomes more established.








m

Gilthranon
07-18-16, 05:17 AM
And parents can hopefully provide those specific needs ... once the child has been diagnosed and the needs are known.

Which is generally around 4 years old or later.
How does one get dxed for such ?

Lunacie
07-18-16, 10:13 AM
How does one get dxed for such ?

The child is observed while playing and talking to the doctor.
The parents talk with the doctor and answer questions.
The parents and any teachers fill out a form, often the Connor's evaluation.

Lunacie
07-18-16, 10:24 AM
My parents knew I had a more sensitive temperament than my brother, beginning early in my infancy.

I think next week I might create a thread discussion to learn more about more sensitive temperaments, before severity of ADHD becomes more established.

m

A sensitive temperament is not always an indicator of ADHD.

It can also indicate autism and other mental illnesses. Or nothing at all except highly sensitive. Temperament or Disorder? (http://www.lihsk.nl/temperament-or-disorder/)



I was listening to a Ted Talk on NPR yesterday explaining which things seem to be the result of genetics or environment.

I think this is it: Nature or Nurture? (http://www.npr.org/2016/07/15/485709299/how-do-nature-and-nurture-combine-to-make-us-who-we-are)

Temperament seems to be mainly genetic, although it can be modified through environment.

mildadhd
07-18-16, 08:31 PM
The child is observed while playing and talking to the doctor.
The parents talk with the doctor and answer questions.
The parents and any teachers fill out a form, often the Connor's evaluation.



Hypothetically speaking if the child was 4, when being diagnosed.

Most of the questions asked, would most likely be about the child's present and past history.

Past history meaning before birth, after birth, ages 1, 2 and 3.


m

mildadhd
07-18-16, 09:19 PM
Temperament and nurture and..




m

Lunacie
07-18-16, 09:20 PM
Temperament and nurture

m

:confused: That's not a sentence. What do you mean?

Pilgrim
07-18-16, 10:11 PM
From personal experience having parents with undiagnosed ADD and dealing with them on an ongoing basis.
Definitely doesn't help ones ADD.
Good communication and awareness is a must.

mildadhd
07-18-16, 10:36 PM
:confused: That's not a sentence. What do you mean?

Temperament and nurture.

Consider children who where diagnosed with ADHD about age 4-7. Many of these children epigenetically inherited a more emotionally sensitive temperament at birth.

What accommodations can we provide for children born with a more emotionally sensitive temperament before the age of 4-7?

How can we recognize a more emotionally sensitive temperament from conception til about the age of 4-7?



m

namazu
07-19-16, 12:18 AM
MODERATOR NOTE:

So as to avoid having parallel threads on the same topic (which gets confusing), please continue this conversation here (http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=178827). Thanks.