View Full Version : Do all newborn babies express the same crying sound?


mildadhd
07-22-16, 01:23 AM
All babies cry after birth, do we all express the same sound?




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midnightstar
07-22-16, 03:25 AM
My understanding is it's a little bit different for each baby so the mum can tell if it's her baby needing attention or someone else's baby.

Fuzzy12
07-22-16, 05:42 AM
The same baby doesn't even utter the same cries all the time. Apparently there is a difference in how babies cry depending on the reason for them crying.

mildadhd
07-22-16, 08:26 AM
My understanding is it's a little bit different for each baby so the mum can tell if it's her baby needing attention or someone else's baby.

The same baby doesn't even utter the same cries all the time. Apparently there is a difference in how babies cry depending on the reason for them crying.

Interesting stuff.

Focusing on only the very first cry, after being born.

I am wondering, if all babies first cry has the same meaning?

Like saying/meaning, "I am scared and cold.."?




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midnightstar
07-22-16, 03:09 PM
mild - and the other first cry could also help the mum "know" the new baby's voice, perhaps? idk, science makes my brain hurt.

Lunacie
07-22-16, 03:21 PM
The reason for baby's first cry is to get their lungs working. One good cry and their lungs can fill with air and start pumping.

This also helps clear out amniotic residue in the lungs and nasal passage.

It may be just as simple as getting the physical engine working properly.

midnightstar
07-22-16, 03:26 PM
The reason for baby's first cry is to get their lungs working. One good cry and their lungs can fill with air and start pumping.

This also helps clear out amniotic residue in the lungs and nasal passage.

It may be just as simple as getting the physical engine working properly.

But in the wild, crying like babies do would bring the predators over for what the predator would think was a new meal, so I don't understand why babies cry that loud and in that tone anyways.

mildadhd
07-22-16, 10:14 PM
I think you all might be partly right.

There is more than one reason why we cry.

Example.

Baby sea otters are not mature enough to hunt with their mothers. When the mother goes hunting under the water in search of food. The baby otter is floating away on top of the sea. When the baby feels separated. The baby will cry. When the mother returns to the surface. She follows the separation call back to the crying baby otter, reuniting the baby with mother. Floating on top of the sea.

-crying would definitely work the lungs.
-separation anxiety
-sad
-scared
-cold
-tired
-uncomfortable
-hungry
-instinctual communication

(Add to the list)

mildadhd
07-22-16, 10:42 PM
The same baby doesn't even utter the same cries all the time. Apparently there is a difference in how babies cry depending on the reason for them crying.

I think there are different sounding cries with different meanings.

I am wondering if everyone's first cry has the same meaning?





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mildadhd
07-22-16, 10:57 PM
It's interesting because my older brother and I sound almost identical on the phone, people can not tell us apart on the phone, even though we are both adopted, originally from different biological mothers?

It's like some basic cries could be instinctual for everyone (preverbal, crying after birth), and, some complex cries could be learned, like distinct sound of a verbal language describing how we feel, lyrics from sad song, etc?










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mildadhd
07-22-16, 11:42 PM
But in the wild, crying like babies do would bring the predators over for what the predator would think was a new meal, so I don't understand why babies cry that loud and in that tone anyways.


Children sometimes mayhide and freeze, when feeling threatened approached by a predator.. I am not sure if babies hide and freeze? I wonder if the two different responses could partly explain slight differences between ADD and ADHD?

I got to review and read more on all these topics in this thread.


Thanks the discussion really helps me learn.


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Lunacie
07-23-16, 09:38 AM
I think there are different sounding cries with different meanings.

I am wondering if everyone's first cry has the same meaning?

m

Well, they don't have words yet, so maybe that first cry is saying "Geez, what a ride!" :lol:

Although babies born by cesarean section also need to cry in order to get their lungs working.

mildadhd
07-23-16, 10:16 AM
Well, they don't have words yet, so maybe that first cry is saying "Geez, what a ride!" :lol:

Although babies born by cesarean section also need to cry in order to get their lungs working.


Preverbal communication, emotional communication is possible.

What ever the type of delivery, the baby is also separated from the mother for the first time, cannot be a happy experience.

I asked a female doctor who has delivered babies, and she told me babies also cry because they go from a comfortable warm "atmosphere", to an uncomfortable "atmosphere".


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mildadhd
07-23-16, 10:41 AM
The same baby doesn't even utter the same cries all the time. Apparently there is a difference in how babies cry depending on the reason for them crying.

Thanks

It is very interesting that we communicate with different preverbal cries that have different meanings, before we develop the ability to communicate verbally with words.




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mildadhd
07-23-16, 02:49 PM
All babies cry after birth, do we all express the same sound?




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Thanks Everyone!

Great thread discussion so far, helps me learn to better verbally express about preverbal communication.

Expanding on the opening post question..

Do all newborn's first cry, have the same preverbal meaning?





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Lunacie
07-23-16, 03:30 PM
Thanks Everyone!

Great thread discussion so far, helps me learn to better verbally express about preverbal communication.

Expanding on the opening post question..

Do all newborn's first cry, have the same preverbal meaning?

m

I haven't found any info about that on line. With no info I don't really have an opinion. What about you?

mildadhd
07-23-16, 05:10 PM
I haven't found any info about that on line. With no info I don't really have an opinion. What about you?

I think communication is based primarily on common preverbal instinctual feelings.

If all babies have distinct preverbal cries meaning, "I feel hungry" and "I feel tired" etc.

It is possible there may also be a distinct meaning for all newborn's first cry.

Dr. Panksepp has done and cited a lot research on separation cries/calls, that I have been wanting to read more about.

I think I will start there, with the all factors listed in this thread in mind.

All recommendations appreciated.

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badwolf616
07-23-16, 06:41 PM
do all new born babies have the same accent? :-D

mildadhd
07-23-16, 08:57 PM
do all new born babies have the same accent? :-D

I think accents are learned, but the basic instinctual meaning of each preverbal feeling is distinct.


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mildadhd
07-23-16, 09:41 PM
Edit/clarify, my last post.

I think accents are learned, but the basic instinctual meanings are the same, for each of the distinct preverbal cries.


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Laserbeak
07-23-16, 10:07 PM
Yes, but it's only a matter of weeks to months that "baby talk" begins to differentiate according to the language spoken by their parents. Expert linguists can often pick up on this and determine a young baby's native tongue before he or she has even spoken his/her first word. Certain sounds drop out of a newborn's sounds like the guttural sounds in German that don't exist in English, then it's quite difficult to try to relearn them properly when trying to learn that language later in life.

mildadhd
07-23-16, 10:32 PM
Yes, but it's only a matter of weeks to months that "baby talk" begins to differentiate according to the language spoken by their parents. Expert linguists can often pick up on this and determine a young baby's native tongue before he or she has even spoken his/her first word. Certain sounds drop out of a newborn's sounds like the guttural sounds in German that don't exist in English, then it's quite difficult to try to relearn them properly when trying to learn that language later in life.

Neat!

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mildadhd
07-23-16, 10:41 PM
Yes, but it's only a matter of weeks to months that "baby talk" begins to differentiate according to the language spoken by their parents. Expert linguists can often pick up on this and determine a young baby's native tongue before he or she has even spoken his/her first word. Certain sounds drop out of a newborn's sounds like the guttural sounds in German that don't exist in English, then it's quite difficult to try to relearn them properly when trying to learn that language later in life.

Would it be correct to call basic preverbal instinctual ""baby talk"" universal or at least partly "recognized in their membership in the human race a common bond?" (see signature)

Lunacie
07-24-16, 09:59 AM
Yes, but it's only a matter of weeks to months that "baby talk" begins to differentiate according to the language spoken by their parents. Expert linguists can often pick up on this and determine a young baby's native tongue before he or she has even spoken his/her first word. Certain sounds drop out of a newborn's sounds like the guttural sounds in German that don't exist in English, then it's quite difficult to try to relearn them properly when trying to learn that language later in life.

I think it's pretty well accepted that babies can hear sounds inside the womb, like their parents voices. So once they start practicing making sounds themselves, of course they repeat what they've been hearing for a few months already.

mildadhd
07-24-16, 11:42 AM
I think it's pretty well accepted that babies can hear sounds inside the womb, like their parents voices. So once they start practicing making sounds themselves, of course they repeat what they've been hearing for a few months already.

I think we all agree that a parents accents are learned from very early in life by the children. That being said, there is also some basic instinctual preverbal "baby vocabulary" that all babies share, very early in life. The same concept applies to our preverbal instinctual raw feelings. Example, everyone is born with the the same raw emotional feeling response systems. These preverbal instinctual basic raw emotional systems form the bases for more complex individual learned emotional experiences. (Same concept applies to basic homeostatic and sensory feelings.) All completely fascinating to me, because we all have these same basic instincts in common, before these basic instincts plus individual learned experiences makes us each of us to appear to be slightly different.


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Lunacie
07-24-16, 04:06 PM
I think we all agree that a parents accents are learned from very early in life by the children. That being said, there is also some basic instinctual preverbal "baby vocabulary" that all babies share, very early in life. The same concept applies to our preverbal instinctual raw feelings. Example, everyone is born with the the same raw emotional feeling response systems. These preverbal instinctual basic raw emotional systems form the bases for more complex individual learned emotional experiences. (Same concept applies to basic homeostatic and sensory feelings.) All completely fascinating to me, because we all have these same basic instincts in common, before these basic instincts plus individual learned experiences makes us each of us to appear to be slightly different.


m

While we have the same basic instincts at birth, there are also differences at birth.

For example, one baby being more emotionally sensitive than the next baby.

mildadhd
07-24-16, 05:06 PM
While we have the same basic instincts at birth, there are also differences at birth.

For example, one baby being more emotionally sensitive than the next baby.

I agree that there may be temperamental differences.

Some people may have a more robust temperament and some people may have a more sensitive temperament (and every possible temperament in between).

But the biological foundation of all temperaments is basically the same.

Example, all newborn babies cry.




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mildadhd
07-24-16, 05:38 PM
Thread side note.

I would love to discuss and learn more about sensitivity.

But could we direct topics related specifically about ADHD and a more sensitive temperament to the thread discussion in the link below (or possibly start a new thread discussion if you choose, if it is okay with moderators, etc?).

http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?p=1825223#post1825223


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