View Full Version : Repetitive work or switching between tasks?


Hermus
07-24-16, 03:09 AM
Recently I had an interview with a guy who could connect me to some job coaches. We talked about my ADD inattentive and he suggested I might need a job that focuses on doing one task for a longer duration of time. However, as I told him my experience is that I need to do work in which I'm required to switch between tasks. Doing the same thing for too long leads to me getting distracted in my own thoughts. However, since I don't have much work experience I'm not completely sure what works best with ADD.

Does anyone have any thoughts on whether in general it would be better for people with ADD to do repetitive work or work that requires them to switch between tasks?

Little Missy
07-24-16, 09:01 AM
What type of work have you done?

stef
07-24-16, 09:30 AM
twell'it would depenf,
the repetivte either has to be interesting, or so easy that i can just do it automatically and think about something else;
and the tasks to swtich between have to each be simple.

Radio Hiker
08-08-16, 05:57 PM
Are we talking "repetitive" as in, sitting on an assembly line all day and slapping stickers on widgets--i.e. the kind of repetitive where you can't get up and move around? They'd be carrying me out of there in a straitjacket jibbering unintelligibly after the first few hours!

I thrive when I work in an environment that allows me to switch between tasks, either as a requirement of the job, or as a natural outcome of the type of work I'm doing. In my job as a supervisor for a building maintenance company, I am never in one place for too long, unless I'm doing a special project. My responsibilities are varied enough that, even if I do the same thing several times during my work shift, it is broken up over the whole shift so that it doesn't feel repetitive. I don't like doing work that allows me to "zone out". I want to be fully engaged in what I do.

bryanrc51
08-10-16, 11:19 AM
Everyone is different but for me if I am unmediated and I try to do some filing of papers after a few minutes I will start freaking out. I will feel like I need to do this faster because it just needs to end but my brain is going 100 and my hands are going 5 then I will start noticing little things all the noise around becomes much more distracting, the edges of the file cabinet feel like they are trying to poke me in the eye I go back to my desk and start hand flapping (sorta not really sure what it is called) and rocking back and forth.

Medicated I can spend hours calmly filing.

spamspambacon
08-10-16, 03:50 PM
Recently I had an interview with a guy who could connect me to some job coaches. We talked about my ADD inattentive and he suggested I might need a job that focuses on doing one task for a longer duration of time. However, as I told him my experience is that I need to do work in which I'm required to switch between tasks. Doing the same thing for too long leads to me getting distracted in my own thoughts. However, since I don't have much work experience I'm not completely sure what works best with ADD.

Does anyone have any thoughts on whether in general it would be better for people with ADD to do repetitive work or work that requires them to switch between tasks?

I like to have a VARIETY of things to do.
Some writing, some moving around, some calculations, some organizing.

I don't mind repetitive work as long I call the shots as to when I can stop doing it. Like after the second time I do it. :D

I especially dislike doing repetitive work that could be done by automation. Like writing the return address on 500 envelopes instead of using pre-printed labels. Or something like that. Those times are when I want to chew my arm off and usually end up saying "this is dumb....why am I doing it like this?" and then getting fired. So....no....repetition is not for me. :D

DJ Bill
08-10-16, 05:56 PM
Today I spent a couple of hours vacuuming dog hair out of my boss's car so he could bring his family to a funeral in it. Yesterday I painted a truck frame - Two days before I spent 8 hours getting it ready to paint sanding, etc. They were all boring, repetitive jobs, but none were permanent. I knew once I got the paint laid down, I would be doing something completely different, for example, like working in the store. Each task was mindless, for the most part. I can obsessively clean, or polish, etc....and then again my kitchen is a total disaster until some day the urge hits.

So I guess my answer is ....repetitive work as long as there is something different around the corner.

There is one caveat....if I get interrupted..........I may not go right back to what I was doing. The same boss likes to interrupt me in the middle of a writing project and I totally loose my "groove" because of the interruption.

At least now I am aware of it ----I have always been this way but never noticed the cause and effect. Some days I was painfully aware something was wrong but I couldn't get my head wrapped around whatever it was. I'd find myself in what I call "stare mode" just lost totally in space or my thoughts or totally blank and not knowing what to do next or unable to get to what I was supposed to be doing.

Jenn1202
08-17-16, 08:14 PM
I can do repetitive work as long as I have something interesting and relatively low-attention going on in the background like a good audiobook. It makes the repetitive work significantly less boring and turns it into a mindless task that I wouldn't mind doing for long periods of time.

Jobs that require constant task switching are great because you never get bored :)