View Full Version : Adult education options for ADD has gotten easier or not?


optimismhitting
08-08-16, 06:25 PM
I found out that some institutions are considering e-learning and distance learning for ADD students (I like referring to them as students rather than patients). Is this really a good thing? I think that it diminishes the "personal touch." It's probably just me, but I can never learn in an e-learning or distance learning set up. I tried getting a Spanish tutor when I was trying to learn the language. Everything was done through Skype and I felt that I wasted my money. :(

What do you guys think?

spamspambacon
08-08-16, 07:03 PM
I don't know specifically what you're referring to, but I recently read (I forget where) that online classes (e-learning/distance learning/etc) are generally not suggested for students with ADHD.

I've experienced online classes for college, and I agree.

I like being in a classroom; I can interact with peers, get help from the professor, listen to answers the professor is giving to another student, etc.

The structure of being in class means you are THERE, not anywhere else. (like doing laundry, or dragging string in front of the cat)
That's another bonus.

Online teaching is like receiving a wall of information from a computer, and what you do with it is up to you. If you aren't sure of something, you're screw*d. Sure, you can email the professor, but usually, if you're confused to begin with, the reply ends up confusing you even more. (hahaha):doh:

PositiveThinker
08-09-16, 11:12 PM
I have always use Skype for online meetings and this is the my way of communicating with friends and relatives abroad . However, just like you, I'm experiencing issues lately with it. Anyway, about e-learning , I consider it one of the most practical ways to do these days. There's a remote interpreting that makes a student and a tutor easier to understand each other. By the way , I heard about this educational video conferencing services, which could be one of the easiest way to educate everyone online. Personally, I think, it could be more effective in reaching out adults with ADD.

optimismhitting
09-04-16, 05:16 PM
I don't know specifically what you're referring to, but I recently read (I forget where) that online classes (e-learning/distance learning/etc) are generally not suggested for students with ADHD.

I've experienced online classes for college, and I agree.

I like being in a classroom; I can interact with peers, get help from the professor, listen to answers the professor is giving to another student, etc.

The structure of being in class means you are THERE, not anywhere else. (like doing laundry, or dragging string in front of the cat)
That's another bonus.

Online teaching is like receiving a wall of information from a computer, and what you do with it is up to you. If you aren't sure of something, you're screw*d. Sure, you can email the professor, but usually, if you're confused to begin with, the reply ends up confusing you even more. (hahaha):doh:

I agree with you that the classroom experience is completely different and the peer interaction goes a long way in making the learning experience a better one, if not the best.

On the other hand, I've taken some seminars or certificate courses online, for example, I took a course in presentation skills and one of the sub courses is in listening and responding with empathy. I know there's software that also include online training for employees, so this is a bit similar. The good thing about the course is that there are hourly sessions, so you can schedule to join one session and make sure you log in at the right time or hour. Then, you can interact with other participants.

However, there are still times when you really need to be in a classroom. For example, for the same presentation skills course, we needed to do a mock presentation before the final presentation. Imagine doing a presentation on skype instead of the classroom? How is that going to fly? What about peer feedback? That is useful too, right?

Impromptu_DTour
09-05-16, 02:04 AM
The bottom line is that you miss alot by not having the option to be apart of the full classroom experience. Interacting with peers in a community setting and being able to tackle issues and discuss, interact and problem solve as a team of people tasked with learning a challenging topic.

However.. having a learning disability which directly inhibits your ability to cooperate in a sustained focus environemnt, especially if you have needs to move and possibly even leave the class at unexpected times to gather or refocus.. can put you in a stressful place where you're basically being robbed of the freedom of having that "easy" learning experience..

Of course this is with the expectation that ADHD is actually a learning disability for the person in question..

Id love to just.. be in class. As normal. but i cant.

As a parent of a 16 month old.. i would love to be able to get everything i can from an e-course.. but i wont. As someone with ADHD.. i really really need the structure of a classroom environment.

However, as someone who has a need for accommodations.. i cant ever discredit an accommodation.. because learning at the tertiary level will never be "too easy".