View Full Version : Women an adhd (article)


sarahsweets
08-12-16, 04:38 AM
http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/us_57978ac5e4b01180b5304ea0

Cool article about about women and aDHD.

acdc01
08-12-16, 07:04 AM
Interesting article. Do you think it's true what they say about females usually being called lazy and dumb while males are more often called disinterested and unmotivated?

I was called lazy (not by family till I was an adult but teachers) but not dumb when young. Does seem like my male cousin was called disinterested instead of lazy.

We are definitely missed more often. I bet that's true for many conditions as the medical field seems extremely sexist to me. Hopefully it's changing.

Lunacie
08-12-16, 10:26 AM
From the article:

But ADHD is not just a childhood condition, and 60 percent of kids do not outgrow it.

I would say that no one actually "outgrows" it.

Some who have only mild symptoms may learn to manage those symptoms, but when life becomes very stressful the ADHD symptoms may resurface.

Sort of like when your treatment is working and the illness goes into remission?


And yeah, the reason I didn't even think about the possibility I had ADHD was because the accepted reality was that only boys had it, acted hyper, and then grew out of it.

I was an adult and a woman, so it couldn't be that, eh?

Greyhound1
08-12-16, 07:13 PM
Sarah,
I am not trying to hijack or take away from your article or thread. It was very interesting. Thanks for sharing!

I read another article recently about women with ADHD. It's kinda disturbing but wanted to share it as well. I hope you don't mind.:)

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160720122838.htm

One third of women with ADHD have anxiety disorders, almost half have considered suicide, study finds -- ScienceDaily

"The prevalence of mental illness among women with ADHD was disturbingly high with 46% having seriously considered suicide, 36% having generalized anxiety disorder, 31% having major depressive disorder and 39% having substance abuse problems at some point in their life," reported Esme Fuller-Thomson, Sandra Rotman Endowed Chair at University of Toronto's Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work and Director of the Institute for Life Course & Aging.

"These rates are much higher than among women without ADHD, ranging from more than four times the odds of suicidal thoughts and generalized anxiety disorders to more than twice the odds of major depressive disorder and substance abuse" said Fuller-Thomson

Investigators examined a representative sample of 3,908 Canadian women aged 20 to 39 of whom 107 reported that they had been diagnosed with ADHD. Data was drawn from the 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey-Mental Health.

"We were surprised at the high levels of physical health problems that the women were experiencing" said Danielle A. Lewis, co-author of the study and a recent MSW graduate of the University of Toronto.

"More than one in four (28%) of these relatively young women said that physical pain prohibited some of their activities, which was much higher than the 9% of their peers without ADHD who had disabling pain. Insomnia was also more prevalent in the women with ADHD in comparison to those without ADHD (43.9% vs 12.2%) as was smoking (41% vs 22%)" stated Lewis.

"Unfortunately, our study does not provide insight into why women with ADHD are so vulnerable. It is possible that some of the mental health problems may be caused by and/or contributing to financial stress" Fuller-Thomson suggested. The study also found, one in three of the women (37%) with ADHD reported they had difficulty meeting basic expenses such as food, shelter and clothing due to their inadequate household income. For women without ADHD, only 13% had this shortfall."

"Many people think of ADHD as primarily a boys' disorder which has little relevance for girls and women. Our findings suggest, to the contrary, that a large portion of women with ADHD are struggling with mental illness, physical health concerns and poverty," said Fuller-Thomson.

"In light of these problems, it is important that primary health care providers are particularly vigilant in monitoring and treating their female patients with ADHD," suggested co-author Senyo Agbeyaka, a graduate student at the University of Toronto.

The results were in a study published online this week in the journal Child: Care, Health and Development.

Lunacie
08-12-16, 07:18 PM
Sarah,
I am not trying to hijack or take away from your article or thread. It was very interesting. Thanks for sharing!

I read another article recently about women with ADHD. It's kinda disturbing but wanted to share it as well. I hope you don't mind.:)

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160720122838.htm

Those facts were also mentioned in the article Sarah linked.

Greyhound1
08-12-16, 07:47 PM
Those facts were also mentioned in the article Sarah linked.

Sorry, will stay out of the Women's section.

Lunacie
08-12-16, 09:41 PM
Sorry, will stay out of the Women's section.

Don't be silly. I appreciate that you thought it was important to the rest of us ... women. ;)

Socaljaxs
08-13-16, 01:05 AM
Sorry, will stay out of the Women's section.

Noooo noo,noooooooo hound you are always welcome here.. I'm someone that wonders to the men AND ADD SECTION QUITE often:lol: it's fun having perspectives from all genders

Greyhound1
08-13-16, 01:19 PM
Thanks you ladies for making me feel welcome!:)

Little Missy
08-13-16, 02:55 PM
Thanks you ladies for making me feel welcome!:)

I like Hound-Abouts. :)

TheFitFatty
08-14-16, 02:15 AM
Great article Sarah. I was never called dumb, lazy yes, but never dumb. However, I was also never scared to try new things, but rather the opposite. I impulsively throw myself at the next thrill or task, and then get bored with it.

I did try to commit suicide (twice) so I guess I fit in there. And I certainly have substance abuse issues.