View Full Version : New...starting assessment process


maple17
08-22-16, 06:14 PM
This will be long, so I apologise in advance.

My daughter is 11, turning 12 in November. I recently met with her music teacher to discuss her transition to grade 7 in February to a new high school and to get some input about her skill and knowledge gained to date (the new school was one she chose and it has a music focus). We chatted for almost an hour. The music teacher mentioned that my daughter had been showing pretty good promise until about a year ago, and since then she's just plateaued. During lessons, her attention wanders off, she doesn't hold eye contact for long. She gets bored, and resists learning the formal fundamentals. The teacher is experienced and has taught a wide range of students, and can accommodate a wide variety of learning styles, and she noticed my daughter is willing to experiment on her own and do her own thing, but not actually focus and learn on what is being taught.

Her regular class teacher and I have not discussed adhd to date, but at the last parent teacher conference, we had talked about my daughter being distracted and forgetting to finish assignments or turn them in. She got 5/10 on effort and organisation (ie. out of 10 weeks, she was fully prepared for half of them). She's quite sensitive in class (has always been an anxious, introverted kid and socially awkward) and it affects her ability to make and keep friends ("why does everyone else get invited to birthday parties except me?"), to take any kind of criticism in a learning setting (she'd often burst into tears last year). We constantly hear that she is able to do more, to achieve more, but doesn't work to her ability. She was an A student in grade 3, above average by grade 4, but then last year, the wheels seemed to come off with her grades and she went to just passing. Standardised country wide achievement testing that she used to do very well in, she failed last year. We had just done a cross country move by that time, so I put it down to the move. I brought my concerns to the teachers at the time and was told it was due to her settling in and the new school and not to worry about it.

What I thought were just her quirks and her personality traits seem to be getting more problematic now the past 18 months as well. She has always been stubborn, determined, creative. Her teachers joke that she is the spark, the personality that shines the brightest in class. She plays music by ear effortlessly. Her artwork is very good. She's apparently a year to 18 months ahead of her peers in tech skiils. She taught herself to read at age 3 by memorising the words. Her preschool teachers at the time had never seen anything like it. In grade one, she was reading at a grade 5-6 level just because of her memorisation and decoding skills, but it took until grade 3 for her comprehension to catch up.

But these days, the impulse stuff is driving us around the bend. She'll often want to start a detailed craft project right at bedtime and we'll argue about it. She is unrelenting with the nagging and demanding. Once she gets something fixed in her head, she just latches onto it and will keep pursuing the topic until it results in a fight and subsequent meltdown for her. One recent trip to the shops, she wanted a particular toy and although she had money in her savings for it, I told her that was savings money (she has trouble with the concept of saving), and it led to a full out meltdown in the shops, the kind you see from toddlers, not kids nearly 12. Afterwards, she was remorseful and I asked her (like all the previous times, before I started even thinking adhd), why oh why she couldn't see what was going on in the midst of it and change her behaviour and she said she just couldn't. She's always sorry and remorseful after the fact, but in the midst of these episodes, she struggles with control.

Her daily life in the past year is a trail of disorganisation...items dropped on the floor at home and never picked up, the school ipad she never remembers to charge it for the morning, forgotten lunch money, forgotten homework book. The impulse control stuff and outbursts are affecting our daily lives more. When she wants to do something, it's "now, now, now" and we struggle against this. The relationship with her younger brother has been affected and he is bearing the brunt of the bad days: outings cancelled etc. because of her behaviour. The amount of times he's tried to talk to her mid-meltdown ("just calm down," "listen to mom,") and he's 8 years old. His maturity is far above hers and he takes everything with a quiet stoicism.

I'll ask her to do something, follow directions, and it's like she only hears part of it. I often get back, "I didn't hear you." We'll tell her to go get something, do something, and she forgets part of it if it was a multistep process. We did hearing tests and vision tests and they were normal.

I talked to a couple of friends since the chat with the teacher. One has a daughter who had been diagnosed a few years ago, and with treatment, she's now in the gifted class at school. Another friend thinks my daughter is just a regular tween and that I'm overreacting and that adhd is a made up diagnosis to medicate kids. I guess I just wanted to share some of my reflections here to see if this is my imagination or worth getting checked out. I was going to call the doctor today and start the process for getting an assessment.

If anyone is in the Melbourne area and has any recommendations for a practitioner to see, please PM me. I'd also like to hear if our experiences sound like anyone else's daughter. I understand that adhd often presents differently in girls than in boys. I don't know yet if she has adhd or some other learning issue. I know though something is amiss and this can't be just ignored. Thanks for listening.

sarahsweets
08-24-16, 02:08 AM
I can identify with your daughter and I also have three kids- all adhd that this reminds me of. It reminds me most of my youngest daughter who can get fixated on things and used to have meltdowns very easily. She cant seem to tolerate stimulants and has depressions so we are using lexapro for the depression and therapy to address all the other stuff.

KeepKalmK
08-24-16, 03:12 AM
Has autistic spectrum disorder been suggested as a co morbid condition? If she has control issues and refuses simple commands she may have ASD subgroup of PDA (pathological demand avoidance). Many people with this condition are first diagnosed with ADHD. If you google PDA you will soon be able to work out if it's a possibility.

maple17
08-24-16, 10:53 PM
Thanks so much for the replies.

I had never heard of PDA before. I just read some of the sites and while a couple of characteristics sound like her, to me anyway, looking at her history and my perspective of her, much of it does not...or maybe I should say, it could resemble it now, but definitely does not reflect her younger years (ie. she never melted down in preschool when asked to do something, didn't have the passive history, and she was a fluent and early speaker). I'm reading some of the blogs from parents who have had their children diagnosed with PDA and it doesn't ring true to what we experienced with our daughter, although the adhd material does.

I will bring it up to the psychologist anyway, but as it isn't a recognised condition here, I'm not sure what they will say.

I did speak with her regular teacher and she echoed some of my concerns. She reaffirmed that she is bright, "so, so creative," and the teacher is always laughing at some of the ideas she comes up with. That said, the issues are there with having to do things the prescribed way vs what my daughter wants to do, the attention span and distractability, and the emotional resilience. But then as the teacher said, this is Grade 6, the kids she's teaching are "hormone soup," and from one day to the next, the emotions of all the students are all over the map and change from minute to minute.

That said, I have booked in a cognitive and educational assessment with child psychologists and I've been assured that the possibility of adhd will be considered during the evaluation process. Anyway, it's the first step. As we're not sure yet if it is adhd, or some other learning issue, then I thought this would be a good first approach.

maple17
08-24-16, 10:59 PM
I can identify with your daughter and I also have three kids- all adhd that this reminds me of. It reminds me most of my youngest daughter who can get fixated on things and used to have meltdowns very easily. She cant seem to tolerate stimulants and has depressions so we are using lexapro for the depression and therapy to address all the other stuff.

Thanks Sarah. I was pretty upset when I first realised last week this could be the issue (and we haven't even got the diagnosis yet), but now I'm just at the stage that I want the evaluations done, want to know what is going on, and how we can help and support her as she moves into high school and the demands on her will increase so much. If that means medication, then that is what it means, but first and foremost I just want to figure out what is going on and help her find her feet. I'm so nervous about the big changes to come next year for her.

maple17
09-20-16, 12:43 AM
Update.

We managed to get her in to see a developmental paediatrician. One who actually had a cancellation and a spot available (otherwise, we would be waiting until March).

The paed is a specialist in developmental paediatrics and has worked in the Learning Disabilities Clinic, Behaviour Clinic, ADHD Clinic and the School Function Program clinic. So, it's fair to say that she knows her stuff, even if I don't find her manner particularly warm and fuzzy.

We talked for about an hour during the initial appointment. She questioned my daughter as well. Based on that first meeting, she said that her history, her symptoms, and our observations (parents and teachers) strongly suggest ADHD. She scored 8/9 on a scale for inattentiveness and 5/9 for the hyperactivity-impulsiveness. She did not mention any PDA or other co-morbidities although the anxiety seems to spin off from the ADHD.

Anyway, the next plan is to get more information from the teacher (more surveys and notes at the request of the paed), and another survey from us, and she would like to start a meds trial after my daughter comes home from the week long school camp in October. I almost feel like the meds trial thing is coming so fast and maybe being pushed, but since all of this is brand new, that's probably why it feels like this. The paed kept saying, "If this were my child, presenting as she is now, I would try medication."

In that time I've also talked to a friend whose daughter was diagnosed years ago and she swears by the medication. That it helped her to become stable and move into the gifted class at school.

I guess I'm still working through this all and I'm just worried about side effects. Thanks for listening.

aeon
09-20-16, 02:09 AM
Meds are first-line treatment for a reason.

I hope your daughter gets what she needs to have a better quality of life.

I was diagnosed at age 41. I only wish I could have been diagnosed as a child and then medicated. Who knows what could have been different. Who knows what I could have done in life.


Best Wishes,
Ian

sarahsweets
09-20-16, 04:05 AM
If you are interested, there is a sticky in children's diagnosis which tells my story about my son. Meds saved his life and they have saved mine.

maple17
09-20-16, 10:54 AM
If you are interested, there is a sticky in children's diagnosis which tells my story about my son. Meds saved his life and they have saved mine.

Thanks, Sarah. I read it and then gave it to my husband to read. I wanted him to see what a difference it might make for her and how it can open up all these possibilities for her that she doesn't have right now. He's open to using this approach as well. I guess I'm just worried about the trial and error bit until we find what works and what dosage. Will life on the "wrong" medication be much worse than what we're dealing with unmedicated? FWIW, her behaviour is not the main issue, her inattention with learning is, but a bit of relief from the impulsiveness and outbursts/meltdowns wouldn't go amiss. ;)

maple17
09-20-16, 11:01 AM
Meds are first-line treatment for a reason.

I hope your daughter gets what she needs to have a better quality of life.

I was diagnosed at age 41. I only wish I could have been diagnosed as a child and then medicated. Who knows what could have been different. Who knows what I could have done in life.


Best Wishes,
Ian

Aw, thanks, Ian. That's what has struck me the past few weeks reading and researching...lost potential from the path not taken.

It was interesting thinking about the genetic component. At first I was like, "There's no one in our family with ADHD," but after careful consideration, I strongly suspect that it runs in my husband's family, but was never diagnosed. My mother-in-law (turning 80 this year!) fits the profile perfectly of an adult woman with ADHD and always has. It's just that no one thought it was that...it was just "how she is." There's also a list of learning issues and anxiety etc. that many of the extended family on my husband's side have dealt with over the years. I wonder how their lives would have been different if they'd received the support and treatment that might have helped them.

sarahsweets
09-21-16, 03:20 AM
Thanks, Sarah. I read it and then gave it to my husband to read. I wanted him to see what a difference it might make for her and how it can open up all these possibilities for her that she doesn't have right now. He's open to using this approach as well. I guess I'm just worried about the trial and error bit until we find what works and what dosage. Will life on the "wrong" medication be much worse than what we're dealing with unmedicated? FWIW, her behaviour is not the main issue, her inattention with learning is, but a bit of relief from the impulsiveness and outbursts/meltdowns wouldn't go amiss. ;)

I suppose its possible to have the wrong med make things more difficult but IME even the wrong dose still gave us hope because some of the issues were addressed-even if just a little. The trial and error thing is a PITA but its not a forever place to be.

maple17
10-05-16, 02:24 PM
Update.

We saw the paed again. Returned the lengthy questionnaires done by us and the teacher. The answers were almost identical in most areas, so we know the behaviours were seeing (the impulsiveness, meltdowns and crying, non-stop talking, inability to finish tasks) is something we're both seeing, not just in one setting or the other.

The paed recommended Vyvanse, starting at 30mg dissolved in 30 ml water and a 15 ml dose once a day for 8 days to see how she goes, then if all is well, increasing to the full 30mg dose. We're waiting until the 15th to start as she's at school camp all week next week and the teachers shouldn't be doing a meds trial on the road.

If anyone has any positive stories of Vyvanse, I'd love to hear them. The Vyvanse forum on here seems to have mostly posts from people who had problems with it.

maple17
10-14-16, 09:28 PM
First day on Vyvanse. She said she had a bit of a stomachache but it went away. Still super chatty and full of energy, but bit of reduced appetite. Happily crafting in clay and not wanting to be online as much.

JennK258
11-25-16, 11:30 AM
Your daughter sounds a lot like my son! ADHD-C but weighted more on the inattentive side.

He has been on Focalin, Adderall, and Vyvanse, and Vyvanse has worked best so far- he seems to have an easier time when it wears off (Focalin come-down made him super cranky!). Some kids have a rough come-down on Vyvanse, but my DS does fine. :)

Everyone is different though... I see it's been a little while since your last post... how has it been working for her?

Personally I think it's great that you are addressing this now before she starts HS. She should be stabilized and used to her meds by next school year- you are setting your girl up for success! :)

maple17
12-08-16, 04:15 AM
Your daughter sounds a lot like my son! ADHD-C but weighted more on the inattentive side.

He has been on Focalin, Adderall, and Vyvanse, and Vyvanse has worked best so far- he seems to have an easier time when it wears off (Focalin come-down made him super cranky!). Some kids have a rough come-down on Vyvanse, but my DS does fine. :)

Everyone is different though... I see it's been a little while since your last post... how has it been working for her?

Personally I think it's great that you are addressing this now before she starts HS. She should be stabilized and used to her meds by next school year- you are setting your girl up for success! :)

Hi Jenn,

Thanks for checking in. Thought I'd post an update.

She's been on Vyvanse for almost two months now. The first week gave her a stomachache about an hour in, but that went away. I had been holding my breath waiting for the side effects (crashes, mood swings etc.), but no really problematic ones showed up. She has had some issues with losing weight (down about 2.5kg since she started), but we've been gradually putting it back on, so that's promising. I was also worried because she has a bit of a mouth tic and you usually read so many negative things about tics and Vyvanse, but it seemed to reduce hers and you can see when the meds have worn off in part because the tic shows up more often in the evenings.

Her teachers and I all noticed a difference right away. Her baby sitter noticed as well. Even within that first week. The meltdowns reduced dramatically and you could actually see her pause before the explosion and take a breath and it was like a switch was flipped and she'd rein it back in. I'd never seen that before. The teachers noticed that she was doing better in school, more focused, finishing her work, and not so up and down emotionally. She was so happy about three weeks into the new regime, she bounced out of school saying that she undertood the maths lesson that day and was even able to explain it to a classmate. She was also invited to a birthday party: her first invitation for the whole school year (and school ends for us in December). She self reported to me that she wanted to stay on the Vyvanse. That she was able to concentrate and "felt better." I noticed she seemed less anxious as well, so that's another bonus.

She's still on the titrated dose as we noticed she was doing so well, with almost no side effects and we didn't see a need to put it up automatically. Her paediatrician said to keep her on the titrated dose over the summer and if she needs it increased to the full 30mg for high school in February, that can be an option then. We have had a few wobbly days when the meds seem to be less effective...she's overtired or hasn't eaten enough and so they can only work at their optimum when she's balanced in other areas too. I do worry about tolerance and have considered taking her off the medication for some periods during the summer holidays, but we tried one day a few weeks back and she was just so angry and irritable that I figured it was making her miserable (I sure know it wasn't a picnic for the rest of us). Her paediatrician saw no reason for discontinuing and thinks the tolerance issue is not a concern, so we're playing it by ear. One of my biggest fears though is that it'll lose effectiveness for her as it's been so helpful and brought a level of calm to our household that we hadn't seen in a while.

Anyway, that's the latest. Hope your son is still doing well too :)

Caco3girl
12-08-16, 03:34 PM
I'm glad you found something that works! My son had the stereotypical mood swings and drastic behavior changes and we had to stop Vyvanse on day 2!

There have been several posts on this board about kids that are just hitting puberty and all of a sudden POOF they have acute ADHD. That's the way it happened with my son too. I mean yeah he was forgetful but he hit puberty and it was a whole other level of ADHD. Probably a link in there someway to the hormones.

maple17
12-08-16, 04:48 PM
I'm glad you found something that works! My son had the stereotypical mood swings and drastic behavior changes and we had to stop Vyvanse on day 2!

There have been several posts on this board about kids that are just hitting puberty and all of a sudden POOF they have acute ADHD. That's the way it happened with my son too. I mean yeah he was forgetful but he hit puberty and it was a whole other level of ADHD. Probably a link in there someway to the hormones.

Yeah, I read all the scary stories re Vyvanse and was waiting for the worst to happen, but thankfully, touch wood, nothing so far. My biggest worry is it losing effectiveness as it seems to work so well for her.

I think the puberty aspect and adhd is a major one for girls. I read it in a few of the books specifically about how the condition impacts girls: something to do with hormones and neurotransmitters. I also read that the effectiveness of her medication might be influenced by the monthly cycle. It makes sense for those of us who had to contend with pregnancy brain, or terrible PMS, or post partum depression...our hormones can really affect our moods and daily functioning. That's probably another reason girls are diagnosed so much later. I know we had a few moments of "how did we miss this," but it's just that the symptoms, although always there, were just not consistent enough or noticeable enough to appear on the radar. We just thought she was a difficult kid to parent. I can see now how it really started to impact her life last year. At least we've gotten her some help before she went into high school and still struggling.

maple17
12-26-16, 08:58 PM
We've been having troubles the past few days. Same dose of Vyvanse, but she's really sad and weepy. We're considering taking her off to see if the sadness abates...I know we'll see more meltdowns without the meds, but I'm not sure what else to do. Paeds' office closed until January and it's not an emergency.

ToneTone
12-26-16, 10:54 PM
Well, I think your daughter's sadness can constitute an urgent development demanding immediate attention. Her sadness and weaping would be the equivalent of a heart patient having dramatic heart palpitations. That patient should immediately report the palpitations to a doctor, vacation or no vacation.

I think you are in your full rights to put in a call to their doctor's answering service. Your daughter's mental health is important. The doctor will understand.

Just my two cents.

Tone

maple17
12-27-16, 04:00 AM
Thanks so much. I will call them tomorrow. She's been fine all today after the latest bout, but will phone the paediatrician on call to see what they advise. I suppose I didn't see it as a crisis as I've read of much worse that many other parents have to contend with (you know the type of stuff I mean). She's not crying all day or anything, just having random bouts of sadness 1-2x a day that last maybe 10 minutes at a time and then are gone and she perks up and seems okay. This even happens 4 hours post medication time, so it's presumably not a crash. It's something new just over holidays and I bet the typical holiday activities (ie staying up later and eating rubbish) haven't helped either. I ask her what's going on and she says she just feels sad. No particular reason.

I'll see what they say and will post an update.

sarahsweets
12-27-16, 06:26 AM
I think it constitutes and emergency. You should at least have them paged to ask if you can stop the meds for a few days.

maple17
12-27-16, 10:24 PM
I did put in a call to her paed's office. Waiting for a callback. She's been fine all last night and today. A bit tired this morning she said, even after 10 hours of sleep.

One of my friends made a valid point when I mentioned this to her. She said, "Wait, but wasn't this sadness and bursting into tears thing what she did every day before meds?" And that is true. Not every single day, but often enough (2-3x a week maybe) that her teachers all remarked upon it and we saw it enough at home too...that a question as simple as "How are you doing?" would make her burst into tears. One of the school secretaries remarked to me before the year ended that whenever my daughter walked into the office during the school year, she always looked so sad. The medication actually seemed to provide her with some stability and eased the anxiety. The meltdowns went down dramatically. The teachers noticed the crying jags stopped. The anxiety related headaches and stomachaches stopped. In fact, it was this week that she mentioned she had a headache and that was the first time since she started the meds that she'd had one. This from a kid who asked for ibuprofen 2x a week before school because of her headaches. I hadn't noticed until I went to get the package and noticed, "Hey, you haven't had a headache in months..."

I'm new to all of this with the meds ups and downs, but knowing my daughter and the situation, I don't think it's as much of an emergency compared to what some of the other families are going through these holidays, so I'm going to wait for the call from the paediatrician and take it from there. She's had a good day so far, eating fine, went to the movies, and we're off swimming this afternoon. I think the sugar over the holidays, lack of routine, and the altered sleep schedules are probably not helping much either. The tween hormones are probably also a big factor, which combined with adhd, are likely contributing to the wobbliness. I remember slamming a lot of doors, screaming, and stomping all over the house at age 12, and I didn't have adhd.

Will keep you posted. Thanks again everyone for the advice and support.

someothertime
12-28-16, 02:51 AM
I just wanted to say hi, and wish you calm resolutions. Remember that you also need r&R. Remember that much malay is the norm during these years so the better you can keep yourself and diffuse of common or transient events the better the underlying issues will resolve. Living habits and routine will go a long long way.... if they are two way and meaningful.

Peace, and all the best with it :)

maple17
12-28-16, 03:19 AM
I just wanted to say hi, and wish you calm resolutions. Remember that you also need r&R. Remember that much malay is the norm during these years so the better you can keep yourself and diffuse of common or transient events the better the underlying issues will resolve. Living habits and routine will go a long long way.... if they are two way and meaningful.

Peace, and all the best with it :)

Thank you. It's been smoother sailing today. She had a smile on her face for most of the day, went to the movies, went for a bike ride, and now just to get a healthy dinner into her for the night. One day at a time I guess.

maple17
03-19-17, 09:50 PM
I just thought I'd update. It's been a few months.

My daughter has settled in to grade 7. Her school has been pretty good so far, proactive. They've got the school psychologist and wellbeing coordinator liaising with the other teachers so I don't have to chase each one individually and explain everything over and over. The couple of teachers I did need to communicate with personally (a maths one over a supposed missed assignment and a music teacher over an audition) have been really supportive and kind to her. The maths teacher made an error on the website tracking assignments and after my daughter and I scratched our heads about it ("I thought that was turned in"), I contacted the teacher and she ran over on lunchbreak to apologise to my daughter and assure her that her assignment was turned in and recorded. So, that's the kind of effort from the teachers. It's been great so far.

She's playing in the junior strings orchestra for band. She's been putting herself out there more activity-wise and signing up for events at school that she never would have last year. Her grades are higher. She's even working ahead of the class on some units, so that's fantastic that she feels so motivated and enjoys it.

A couple of wobbly afternoons after the medication wears off. We upped her dose to 20ml (30mg Vyvanse in 30 ml water), and that seems to be going fine, but it's usually out of her system by dinnertime and with band practices and concerts in the evenings, that makes it a bit tougher for her. That's also when we might see a bit of the short fuse at home as well when her frustration tolerance is really low again. We'll discuss it with her paediatrician at the upcoming appointment to see if she recommends any changes to dosing or timing.

And we finally had one of her assessments done: the WIAT-II. She was on a waiting list at school, but they said it would be about 8-9 months before she got in, and she'd be done grade 7 by then, so we went private. We still need the WISC-V done and we'll likely be coughing up for that one too next term. Anyway, she tested high average in almost everything, with an age equivalent of anywhere from 14-16 (she's 12). The two areas she was found to have a bit of trouble were with listening comprehension (average) and pseudoword decoding (average). She's scheduled for an auditory processing test in May. I suspect, and the psychologist agrees, that she might have some auditory processing issues and further evaluation will help determine this. The psychologist made a number of recommendations for the school regarding the type of workspace she needs, how instructions should be presented (small bits of info and ask for clarification), the need for external reminders (checklists, templates) and anything to support her with the working memory and processing issues. And the need to really scaffold the curriculum for her with clear expectations and structure. And the psychologist also picked up on the possible ASD aspect as well, so she's the second professional to mention it and we'll be pursuing that additional diagnosis. It won't do anything in terms of funding or additional support, but will give the teachers that additional information so they are not tough on her for things that are not her fault. Her grade 6 teacher last year was on her case about reading aloud with "more expression" and making more of an effort to be socially engaged with her peers, sigh. Anyway, this first assessment will be used to formulate a learning plan for her. So, we're on our way to making sure she has all the support through school that she needs. I've also set up counselling as well for her starting in May.

So, so far, so good. :yes:

Postulate
03-20-17, 08:52 AM
I got 1.8/20 in music when I was 12. My teacher was having very serious convos with me regarding that, as though my life depended on passing her music class, but I had already hooked with the "right" boys in my class to know music was totally irrelevant to passing the grade.

We all recognize ADHD symptoms so now it's a matter of getting her to a psych for a diagnosis and treatment.

maple17
03-20-17, 07:13 PM
She was diagnosed ADHD by a developmental and behavioural paediatrician six months ago. Just following up on the suspected ASD as well. I mentioned her meds in the previous post, and wouldn't be giving them to her if she were undiagnosed. Not to mention they're so tightly controlled here, you need governmental approval to fill the prescription.

I'm surprised and pleased at how much better she's doing this year compared to last. She's just happier, more content. I can see she's coping better. And the school is supportive and she has all these tools to stay organised (like the app on her phone that lists her classes and assignments due etc.)

She mentioned yesterday she was going to join the anime art club. She's never wanted to join any clubs outside of band.

Caco3girl
03-21-17, 10:37 AM
She was diagnosed ADHD by a developmental and behavioural paediatrician six months ago. Just following up on the suspected ASD as well. I mentioned her meds in the previous post, and wouldn't be giving them to her if she were undiagnosed. Not to mention they're so tightly controlled here, you need governmental approval to fill the prescription.

I'm surprised and pleased at how much better she's doing this year compared to last. She's just happier, more content. I can see she's coping better. And the school is supportive and she has all these tools to stay organised (like the app on her phone that lists her classes and assignments due etc.)

She mentioned yesterday she was going to join the anime art club. She's never wanted to join any clubs outside of band.

Sounds like she is really coming out of her shell, I'm very happy for you and her!

maple17
03-21-17, 06:18 PM
Thanks. I know we're early days yet and still have all of her teens to go through, but I'm just so pleased that she seems happier and is coping much better than last year. That's what matters.