View Full Version : Lo carb for small weight loss?


sarahsweets
08-26-16, 06:12 AM
I had gastric bypass in '08 and lost a lot of weight. I am happy to say that I was a fortunate person because while it was a lot, I was young enough where I didnt have a lot of the issues with skin and such that others have had. I lost over 100lbs. I have a whole situation going on with my hormones due to a mass on my adrenal and thyroid glands- which the docs are dicking me around deciding what to do with it. Over a year ago, I gained 20lbs overnight. I eat pretty clean- almost no sugar, not a lot , no fast food.(although the last month I know I have had too many refined carbs,) My diet hadnt changed, it was just one of the many symptoms I had. I would like to take off that 20lbs in the interim. I know that exercise helps but I feel like if my carb intake were lowered, I would have a better shot at the weight loss in case my exercise isnt up to par. I am not necessarily talking like Atkins, just limited carbs and the ones I do eat to be as natural and healthy as possible. Has anyone had success this way? For example, yesterday overall I had 3 salads with caesar dressing, but I dont put it on the salad, I dip my fork so I hadnt even eaten a whole table spoon. I had swiss cheese, a small portion of whole wheat pasta, and some turkey meatballs, as well as a handful of almonds.
Thats the gist of what I ate. I eat frequently and in small portions so I am not strarving at meal times. I also eat steel cut oats and probiotic low sugar yogurt with granola. Any advice? Any tips?
I am not trying to say that the extra 20lbs is some horrible thing, but for me, with the way my clothes fit and the way I feel physically I need to break away from the refined crap.

Laserbeak
08-26-16, 06:42 AM
Low carb is the only diet that ever worked for me. I lost like 60 pounds in 4 months!

Little Missy
08-26-16, 06:47 AM
It sounds like you are doing it all the right way. I noticed that if I eat any bread, even sprouted Ezekiel or steel cut oats that my jeans get tight and I HATE that.
Then I go back to hard boiled eggs, very filling! A Handful of walnuts, vegetables and sometimes I roast a salt free chicken. A banana.
Salt can really whack out adrenals. I can not eat any salt at all. Even if I do the fork tines dip into pre-prepared salad dressings the water retention is a drag.
Remember also that many meds can make even the teeniest eater gain weight.
:)

Unmanagable
08-26-16, 08:14 AM
Speaking as a former morbidly obese person, I never lost any significant amount of weight, or kept it off once I lost it, until I eliminated ALL meat, dairy, eggs, and most grains.

Once I eliminated those things and started moving my lymph via daily mini-trampoline and hula hooping (making exercising accessible by making it part of my decor), I shed 110 lbs, still eat and move that way, and feel better than ever.

I do other things in between all of the above to support it, too, like dry skin brushing, cooler showers, massage therapy, acupuncture, etc. I've learned the food intake isn't nearly as important as the ability to eliminate it once we've eaten it.

We tend to get lost in the protein myth, the calorie myth, the alphabet agencies recommendations based on studies highly funded by the meat and dairy industry, etc.

aeon
08-26-16, 10:03 AM
I would like to take off that 20lbs in the interim. I know that exercise helps

No, it does not. Study after study has shown that exercise has next to nothing to do with losing weight. Itís healthy for other reasons, but if weight loss is the goal, reduction of how much you eat is the way to do it.

Itís not even a question of biology so much as a question of physics. :)

but I feel like if my carb intake were lowered, I would have a better shot at the weight loss in case my exercise isnt up to par. I am not necessarily talking like Atkins, just limited carbs and the ones I do eat to be as natural and healthy as possible. Has anyone had success this way?

Low carb is one way to do it, but what is really needed is a reduction in calories. Low carb can be a part of that.

I am not trying to say that the extra 20lbs is some horrible thing, but for me, with the way my clothes fit and the way I feel physically I need to break away from the refined crap.

Eat what you want, when you want, and make sure you eat stuff that satisfies...for me, that means indulgent things.

Just eat less of those things.

It really is simple as that.

Anyone who tells you otherwise is either clueless, or lying to you in order to take your money. :)


Cheers,
Ian

Joker_Girl
08-27-16, 01:49 AM
Speaking as a former morbidly obese person, I never lost any significant amount of weight, or kept it off once I lost it, until I eliminated ALL meat, dairy, eggs, and most grains.



How do you keep from being hungry all the time?

I have tried to go where I eat mostly vegetables and fruits sometimes, but I just get where I am so hungry. Not just craving stuff. Like HUNGRY.

And I have gotten so fat. Really I've gained so much weight over the last ten years. It's depressing and I don't feel good.

Pugly
08-27-16, 04:30 AM
I'm no expert, but I've recently experienced some weight loss so I have some things to say about this. I was diagnosed with diabetes so I needed to change my diet/lifestyle up a bit, and losing weight is a side effect of these changes. I've lost 20lbs in about 3 months... went from about 245 to 220. And I seem to be continuing the loses... I've just recently broke 220lbs too. I've never been this fit in my life. I've always been fat/inactive.

I'm a pretty avid biker. I bike commute, and get around everywhere on a bike. So for the most part I have the exercise thing down. Because of the biking, I basically gave myself free reign to eat whatever I wanted. That however didn't lead to much weight loss... initially I lost some pounds... but nothing drastic. I only started losing significant weight after I changed my diet.

So my diet changes were to eat basically 50% of my meals as salads. I go low carb, but not really super low carb. Initially I was crazy low carb, but that's very hard to maintain and many of my favorite foods have carbs. So when I eat a meal that has some carbs in it... I just keep in mind what has the carbs and don't eat anything else with the carbs. If I get a burger, I don't have the fries. If I eat the fries then I'll eat a salad or piece of chicken with it. I eat nuts and cheese as snacks instead of chips. I have to be careful though because of the fat, but I find these sort of snacks to be much more filling than the chips I ate before. I seriously could eat a whole bag of chips in one sitting.... not good...

I still eat chips now though. But I'm very careful to keep them to 1-2 servings at most. I physically count out the chips and then eat them and put them away. This is probably the hardest thing for me to do... But it's essential for me now. I also like to measure out things that have fat/carbs... like salad dressing, dips and whatnot. . I bought a bunch of extra tablespoons to measure out this stuff, as I think it's very easy to over estimate how much I'm using.

Again, I'm no health expert or even a health nut. And I'm certainly not eating a super pure diet by any means. But with these changes I've seen some benefit, so just wanted to share it.

Unmanagable
08-27-16, 08:39 AM
How do you keep from being hungry all the time?

I have tried to go where I eat mostly vegetables and fruits sometimes, but I just get where I am so hungry. Not just craving stuff. Like HUNGRY.

And I have gotten so fat. Really I've gained so much weight over the last ten years. It's depressing and I don't feel good.

It was super hard, especially at first, mainly because of my taste bud addictions and the parasitic demands of all the critters I'd been steadily supplying with their sugar/salt fixes via the food-like substances I'd been taught we are supposed to fuel our bodies with in my gut. What we call hunger pangs/pains isn't true hunger, it's our parasites needing another "fix".

And also because I believed the whole "all you have to do is eat less", and the "eat more protein", and the "count those calories" and the "just eat local and free range meats, eggs, and dairy" mindsets.

I also used the food pyramid as a guide. That was obviously my first mistake from the get go. No one taught me to ALSO count the chemicals, properly combine the foods, eat seasonally, don't drink with your meals, chew your food really well, etc., etc.

What is taught as being acceptable in the nutrition arena are all the wrong answers for my specific biology, apparently, because after several years of trying ALL of the above, along with spending tons of money on weight watchers, paleo, jenny craig, atkins, etc., etc., I continued to weigh over 300 pounds and felt like s***. I eat much larger portions than I used to, often times, but I choose much cleaner/seasonal versions of food, which helps big time.

I had to teach myself to slowly introduce the healthier versions and transition s-l-o-w-l-y vs. wanting/expecting fast results, as usual. Although hindsight is always my best teacher.

I dived right into all fruits and veggies, attempted all raw at first, and my body let me know just how hard it was to adjust. I was doing these things as a result of a medical emergency, though, so I was feeling very rushed and desperate. Trying to fix a lifetime of poor choices in just a few weeks or months doesn't work, even if you're a surgeon. More issues tend to come after.

The major release of stored up toxins in our bodies once we decide to clean things up often causes very unpleasant symptoms that resembles flu-like symptoms, etc. that we rush to mask so we can carry on in our days instead of letting our bodies do what they know best. Nature's operating table is different than the typical operating table we've been used to. We're taught to mask and suppress so we can work and produce.

I focus on hydration in the mornings with lots of clean water, hot herbal infusions as my "tea", often some fruit juice, then I eat fruit for break-fast (learning how to properly combine foods was essential - we do it all wrong for our gut's best interest), more fruit for a snack, lunch is often a giant salad, or sometimes more fruit (I make my own salad dressings or buy organic versions to avoid the high fructose corn syrup and such in most store brands), or a wrap of some sort using a giant leaf vs. bread-like substances (gluten is real b**** in my body), afternoon snacks are often sliced veggies of some sort with a homemade hummus and such, organic chips or homemade chips and salsa, and dinner consists of a combination of any of the following: a legume (lentils, adzuki, chick peas, and split peas are my favorites), quinoa is also good to add to salads or as a side, once in a while I'll include marinated tofu of some sort, baked sweet potatoes are a favorite, roasted veggies of all sorts, or grilled stuff like mushroom caps (as a burger replacement), sliced tomatoes, topped with basil and oregano, etc., etc.

It takes a lot of thought, work, and preparation to make it happen and it's anything but easy, until you find your groove, then it falls into place rather smoothly most days, and the clean up is much nicer than cleaning up after preparing dead animals and such. I also supplement with B12. D3, zinc, and occasionally some tinctures.

I was catapulted into all of this by means of hoping to save my gall bladder from being harvested by the surgeons. I managed to keep my organ and improve my health more than I ever thought was possible, especially based on what all the medical "professionals" had to say.

They're quick to want to solve our issues under their very expensive knife, which is great in emergency life-saving circumstances, but they're not much on learning about or discussing preventive and ongoing maintenance that keeps us out of their offices. It reminds me of a quote about surgeons being able to remove everything but the cause. Our food supply is the cause of much of our dis-ease, as I've learned in my adventures.

I thought giving up cigarettes was the hardest thing I ever did, until the diet changes had to happen. Remember, doctors used to do commercials and magazine ads and such supporting the smoking habit, too. Gee, imagine that. I guess the tobacco industry was funding a bunch of studies back in those days.

Hard core food addiction is something we never think of because eating is something we have to do to survive, but so many of us are so f'n miserable, still chasing down answers in a doctor's office vs. on our plate. It's all designed that way, and working a bit too well, in my opinion.

Joker_Girl
08-27-16, 11:20 AM
Do you think I'd be better off buying fruits and veggies like from a farmer's market, and growing my own, too? In an attempt to avoid additives?

Do you think the additives are what causes the problem?

Back in the day, people ate potatoes and sausage gravy and yet stayed slim. Do you think it's about trying to eat more unprocessed foods?

I was reading the other day about this special wheat, it's an ancient variety, a kind used thousands of years ago. It's supposed to be good for you.

I think the thing I crave in my food is something that will help me to feel fuller longer, and it seems like that is proteins, and a little fat. I don't have a problem with lean meats, dairy, etc.

I hate being hungry, especially if I'm spending most of the day that way.
What about like fiber powder, to add to juice or something? Or like fiber con tablets.

Unmanagable
08-27-16, 12:23 PM
I answered underneath and bolded my responses:

Do you think I'd be better off buying fruits and veggies like from a farmer's market, and growing my own, too? In an attempt to avoid additives?

I think it makes a big difference, but if that isn't possible, buying fresh fruits and veggies, or frozen, is always healthier than the canned varieties.

Do you think the additives are what causes the problem?

I think (and am now convinced after giving them up for over a year) that they create MANY problems. How many of the ingredients on boxes and cans can you actually pronounce and recognize? Do you truly know what you ingest and how your body does or doesn't recognize each thing? Our bodies don't recognize it and can't healthily process it, no matter what the alphabet agencies and commercials say about it.

Back in the day, people ate potatoes and sausage gravy and yet stayed slim. Do you think it's about trying to eat more unprocessed foods?

They also got up with the sun, worked their land all day, grew their own foods, and stayed much more physically active than we do. There wasn't a s*** load of preservatives and additives in their meals, nor were their microwaves to zap the energies and nutrition out of the foods.

I was reading the other day about this special wheat, it's an ancient variety, a kind used thousands of years ago. It's supposed to be good for you.

Ancient grains are recommended as a much cleaner version over the more highly processed grains, for sure. Quinoa is one of my favorites. I haven't tried any of the others yet.

I think the thing I crave in my food is something that will help me to feel fuller longer, and it seems like that is proteins, and a little fat. I don't have a problem with lean meats, dairy, etc.

Learning other sources of protein in plant-based foods may be helpful. Protein isn't strictly animal based. For example, there's a wild "weed", named purslane, that grows all over that has more omega 3s than meat. Also, think about this.......where do the animals who don't eat meat get their protein to pass along to us? We feed them a plant-based diet, yet are convinced we need to eat them to get our nutrition. Pretty twisted logic. Eliminate the middle man.

I hate being hungry, especially if I'm spending most of the day that way.
What about like fiber powder, to add to juice or something? Or like fiber con tablets.

To me, that's just another very highly processed synthetic version of something I can get a much cleaner version of directly from the plant sources.

sarahsweets
08-27-16, 02:12 PM
Re: ancient grains..I was curious as to what it meant to be considered an ancient grain. There is actually a council called "National grain counsel " or something like that where they explain exactly what they are.

Unmanagable
08-27-16, 03:18 PM
Re: ancient grains..I was curious as to what it meant to be considered an ancient grain. There is actually a council called "National grain counsel " or something like that where they explain exactly what they are.

I learned of them and the various effects by working directly with a nutritionist/registered dietitian a while back when my struggles became more intense.

Eliminating grains totally, then introducing them back let me know real quick which ones my innards had no use for.

Rice, of all kinds, tears my guts up now, and I used to eat brown rice frequently and assumed all forms of rice were a healthy option.

Here's a link to the council you mention:

http://wholegrainscouncil.org/whole-grains-101/whats-whole-grain/ancient-grains

peripatetic
08-27-16, 03:48 PM
hey sarah,

i hope whatever path you choose works out for you and that you feel good about yourself, because you're awesome :D

full disclosure: i've never been on a proper "diet". so, yeah, i'm about to be the hated person on this thread :o BUT, i can tell you why and maybe that'll help?

as others have mentioned, i, too, eat a minimum of processed foods. just now for lunch i had some shrimp and summer squash. about enough to look nice on a salad plate.

because, also as others have mentioned, portion control is huge. most people i see who are more robust eat less frequently, don't drink as much water as i do, and when they do eat they eat a lot more. (i'm speaking of, for example, my university roommate, whose dining habits were pretty familiar to me because we spent a LOT of time together)

i think sometimes people mistake thirst for hunger. i also think that, and perhaps this is a cultural thing (?), often people eat until they feel "full". i saw joker girl's post and it reminded me of that:

How do you keep from being hungry all the time?

I have tried to go where I eat mostly vegetables and fruits sometimes, but I just get where I am so hungry. Not just craving stuff. Like HUNGRY.


i'm very rarely "starving" feeling...but i'm equally rarely "full". i eat comparatively small meals (compared to most americans and brits). they tend to have an amount of protein and about three times as much veg. like i said, it fits comfortably onto a salad plate. and speaking of which, many things are portioned HUGE in the states and in the UK.

back to the feeling "full"... i really dislike feeling stuffed. it's only happened a few times to me, thanksgiving was once one, for sure. and it did make me lethargic and sick feeling. i think the idea of eating until one is "full" makes food less of an energy source and more of an emotional comfort. depending on your activity level, you only *need* about 1200 calories if you're an average female. i run a lot and i'm 5'10, so i probably get closer to 1500. numbers aside, though, i eat until i'm not hungry. which, being not hungry and being full are different to me. i eat just enough to not be hungry.

anyway, i don't think low carb is necessarily good or bad...but you have to ask yourself: is this a lifestyle i can live with? because doing something for a few months may help reduce weight...but what happens after that?

also, with the ancient grains, i can't say for certain, but i believe we eat a fair amount of those. we rotate grains (farro, spelt, buckwheat groats, millet, quinoa, brown rice) so that little e gets a good variety and to keep up her taste for different foods. they're delicious! the only thing is that's where portion control comes in. i maybe eat one rounded serving spoon of them at a time. like i said, i tend to stick with protein and veg. i LOVE fruit, but it's really sugary and so i try to have only a couple of pieces per day. i don't each much dairy because i'm sensitive to lactose, so it's mostly yoghurt. i am picky about bread, so i will eat really good bread, but only one chunk and it's not a daily thing. i like things more lightly sauced and i only eat "junk" food, like almond croissants, ice cream, pie...rarely. like, maybe once a month, and always about half of what a standard portion looks like. i'm not a huge fan of super processed junk, like cheetoes or something, but i do like olives and nuts for the salt and taste. if i were trying to eat less calorie dense foods, i'd go for pickles over olives/nuts.

finally, with exercise, as aeon said it's not going to go as far as you might think. i run five miles most days and it maintains me, i don't lose weight from it. your body gets accustomed to activity quickly, but it's so good for your cardiovascular system and for bone density. but you do half an hour and it probably burns less calories than one junk food serving. what exercise DOES do for me is it makes me less hungry overall. it makes me thirsty, but it also makes me more aware of what i'm eating. it makes eating feel more like fuel and less like an indulgence.

hope that helps...xx

Joker_Girl
08-27-16, 07:48 PM
Ya, I hate to be super full, too.
I don't like to be to one extreme or the other.
I need to be more active, and am working on it. But I'm severely out of shape, and having to ease into it. When it is slow at work, I've been taking my little phone/pager, and going to the track (it's attached to the building and air conditioned/heated; it used to be used by our physical therapy department, but as they've remodeled their area, it's become kind of the place the nurses and doctors go to walk when it's slow).

I try to go by myself if possible, because I walk fast enough that it's difficult for me to hold a conversation because I will be to out of breath. I try to walk faster than I normally do. If I go with a buddy, we end up chatting and I don't think it's as good of a workout. It takes 20 laps to make a mile, so I try to walk 4 or 5 laps fast, then a lap or two more slowly to kind of recover, and then fast again etc.

I'm ashamed to be so out of condition that a mile of this is about all I can do right now. I used to be able to walk miles and miles. Now at 3/4 to 1 miles, I am sweaty and panting almost by the end. Of course I am also 45 years old and probably 70 lbs above my ideal weight, and 40 or 50 lbs above where I feel good.

I really want to lose weight and be more active to feel better. We are going to Mexico in the spring, and I want to be able to walk long distances without being winded. Also, it would be nice to look better.

Sarah and Unmanagable, congrats on your weight losses. You must feel so much better.

On the subject of grain, I've thought before it might be interesting to try grinding my own flour. This is as much because it just sounds cool as for health benefits. It satisfies my inner hippie, the part who wants to make homemade pickles and laundry soap, and raise chickens. You can buy wheat berries from this ancient strain of wheat. I wish I could remember the name.

Sometimes if I get super hungry I feel like I eat too fast.

TheFitFatty
08-28-16, 02:27 AM
I had gastric bypass in '08 and lost a lot of weight. I am happy to say that I was a fortunate person because while it was a lot, I was young enough where I didnt have a lot of the issues with skin and such that others have had. I lost over 100lbs. I have a whole situation going on with my hormones due to a mass on my adrenal and thyroid glands- which the docs are dicking me around deciding what to do with it. Over a year ago, I gained 20lbs overnight. I eat pretty clean- almost no sugar, not a lot , no fast food.(although the last month I know I have had too many refined carbs,) My diet hadnt changed, it was just one of the many symptoms I had. I would like to take off that 20lbs in the interim. I know that exercise helps but I feel like if my carb intake were lowered, I would have a better shot at the weight loss in case my exercise isnt up to par. I am not necessarily talking like Atkins, just limited carbs and the ones I do eat to be as natural and healthy as possible. Has anyone had success this way? For example, yesterday overall I had 3 salads with caesar dressing, but I dont put it on the salad, I dip my fork so I hadnt even eaten a whole table spoon. I had swiss cheese, a small portion of whole wheat pasta, and some turkey meatballs, as well as a handful of almonds.
Thats the gist of what I ate. I eat frequently and in small portions so I am not strarving at meal times. I also eat steel cut oats and probiotic low sugar yogurt with granola. Any advice? Any tips?
I am not trying to say that the extra 20lbs is some horrible thing, but for me, with the way my clothes fit and the way I feel physically I need to break away from the refined crap.


While I understand how irritating it is to be carrying around extra weight, if the gain is from a hormonal imbalances than playing around with a restrictive diet that isn't approved by a doctor could be dangerous. Low carb or cutting our whole food groups can mess with hormone levels even when you're 100% healthy. Don't risk it.

At the least, a restrictive diet will probably be completely pointless. You probably won't notice significant, if any, weight loss until your thyroid issues are dealt with. :( Especially as your diet is healthy to begin with.

If I were you I would focus on fitness and pushing the doctors to make a decision about what they want to do about the mass.

Sorry, but that's probably not what you wanted to hear. :(

Unmanagable
08-28-16, 07:32 AM
While I understand how irritating it is to be carrying around extra weight, if the gain is from a hormonal imbalances than playing around with a restrictive diet that isn't approved by a doctor could be dangerous. Low carb or cutting our whole food groups can mess with hormone levels even when you're 100% healthy. Don't risk it.

At the least, a restrictive diet will probably be completely pointless. You probably won't notice significant, if any, weight loss until your thyroid issues are dealt with. :( Especially as your diet is healthy to begin with.

If I were you I would focus on fitness and pushing the doctors to make a decision about what they want to do about the mass.

Sorry, but that's probably not what you wanted to hear. :(

Or in my case, I experienced the opposite. Which is why I like to share my experiences. I wouldn't have believed me either, until I lived it myself. Everyone is different and there are no blanket answers from doctors that works for each.

Playing around with doctor's advice (mostly via prescribed meds as they aren't trained properly or thoroughly regarding nutrition) while trying to figure out how to healthily treat hormone imbalances on top of the other multiple diagnoses they handed me (insomnia, IBS, nervous stomach, severe arthritis, severe fibromyalgia, severe adhd, severe anxiety, severe depression, etc.), with them paying very little to no attention to the foods I freely told them I ate (I weighed over 300 pounds, but they apparently thought I was eating healthy enough based on me sharing what I ate - which included LOTS of fast foods, frozen entrees, sweet tea, etc. - they NEVER discussed healthier eating options - told me alcohol was healthy in moderation, etc.).

Had I not taken things into my own hands after my gall bladder attack and started seeking answers outside of what doctors provide, I feel certain I'd be incapacitated or perhaps would have finally made that final decision to leave this existence to escape my suffering. Doctors are helpful in some areas, but I found nutrition definitely isn't one of them.

Unmanagable
08-28-16, 08:16 AM
Or in my case, I experienced the opposite. Which is why I like to share my experiences. I wouldn't have believed me either, until I lived it myself. Everyone is different and there are no blanket answers from doctors that works for each.

Playing around with doctor's advice (mostly via prescribed meds as they aren't trained properly or thoroughly regarding nutrition) while trying to figure out how to healthily treat hormone imbalances on top of the other multiple diagnoses they handed me (insomnia, IBS, nervous stomach, severe arthritis, severe fibromyalgia, severe adhd, severe anxiety, severe depression, etc.), with them paying very little to no attention to the foods I freely told them I ate (I weighed over 300 pounds, but they apparently thought I was eating healthy enough based on me sharing what I ate - which included LOTS of fast foods, frozen entrees, sweet tea, etc. - they NEVER discussed healthier eating options - told me alcohol was healthy in moderation, etc.).

Had I not taken things into my own hands after my gall bladder attack and started seeking answers outside of what doctors provide, I feel certain I'd be incapacitated or perhaps would have finally made that final decision to leave this existence to escape my suffering. Doctors are helpful in some areas, but I found nutrition definitely isn't one of them.

I forgot to finish my long a** sentence above. My bad. Playing around with the doctors' advice is what kept me in a miserable state that I couldn't find my way out of with their help. The hellish holes kept getting deeper and more painful, in many ways.

That included two general practitioners, two psychiatrists, multiple therapists, a gastroenterologist, a dermatologist, and all the specialties in between who did the MRIs, the CAT scans, the ultra-sounds, etc.

The more help I sought from them, the worse my health got. My general practitioner now takes notes when I go for my check-ups so she can share much of what I do with her other patients stuck in a rut.

sarahsweets
08-28-16, 11:57 AM
because, also as others have mentioned, portion control is huge. most people i see who are more robust eat less frequently, don't drink as much water as i do, and when they do eat they eat a lot more. (i'm speaking of, for example, my university roommate, whose dining habits were pretty familiar to me because we spent a LOT of time together)

Thats one thing the GP has helped with. I cant eat very much at one sitting and honestly, until recently I was pretty clean-but upon reflection I realized I have been eating too many bad carbs. I know people say its not about cutting out certain foods and groups all together but I have been feeling so good these last few days, that I can only assume its because of my diet. My proteins have been cheese, natural peanut butter, nuts, and eggs. I had tuna two days as well. Last night I had one chicken drumstick at a picnic but I made the chicken so I knew what was in it. Cutting down on the meat seems to be helpful but I dont desire to give it up all together. I have had so many salads- and its been great. I dont know why I didnt do this earlier. Havent had any breads, pasta, crappy rice, sugars, anything with additives in it. I dont know if it will help my weight but it has made a good difference with my mood and energy-even in this heat.


i think sometimes people mistake thirst for hunger. i also think that, and perhaps this is a cultural thing (?), often people eat until they feel "full". i saw joker girl's post and it reminded me of that:

Yes I agree with this and I need to work on my water intake. For some reason its tough for me. I drink coffee(of course) homemade iced tead-plain and water. But I need to drink more of it. The issue I have is everything going on with me-the adrenal mass sometimes seems to press on my kidneys which somehow seems to make pee alot and all the time! I dont know why this is though.


anyway, i don't think low carb is necessarily good or bad...but you have to ask yourself: is this a lifestyle i can live with? because doing something for a few months may help reduce weight...but what happens after that?

It has been so easy- I cant believe it. Its like I just decided to be done with crap- and its not a problem. There were all kinds of sweets and fatty salads yesterday and it wasnt an effort to avoid them- I just chose differently. Hopefully it stays this easy. I've been monitoring my calories with an app so I know I am not eating as many.

C15H25N3O
08-28-16, 08:43 PM
Low carb, high fat and high protein is not healthy.

Ask your liver!

:-)

Better try it having no breakfast like some Vyvanse users or try what nature gave us. :-P

Salads are good but sauces are evil. Why not eating pure and raw vegetables. Carrots and peppers are tasty.

TheFitFatty
08-29-16, 01:20 AM
Or in my case, I experienced the opposite. Which is why I like to share my experiences. I wouldn't have believed me either, until I lived it myself. Everyone is different and there are no blanket answers from doctors that works for each.

Playing around with doctor's advice (mostly via prescribed meds as they aren't trained properly or thoroughly regarding nutrition) while trying to figure out how to healthily treat hormone imbalances on top of the other multiple diagnoses they handed me (insomnia, IBS, nervous stomach, severe arthritis, severe fibromyalgia, severe adhd, severe anxiety, severe depression, etc.), with them paying very little to no attention to the foods I freely told them I ate (I weighed over 300 pounds, but they apparently thought I was eating healthy enough based on me sharing what I ate - which included LOTS of fast foods, frozen entrees, sweet tea, etc. - they NEVER discussed healthier eating options - told me alcohol was healthy in moderation, etc.).

Had I not taken things into my own hands after my gall bladder attack and started seeking answers outside of what doctors provide, I feel certain I'd be incapacitated or perhaps would have finally made that final decision to leave this existence to escape my suffering. Doctors are helpful in some areas, but I found nutrition definitely isn't one of them.


That's wonderful for you. I'm glad you found things that worked. However, you aren't sarah and sarah wants to lose 20lbs while dealing with a hormone imbalance. If she wants to go to the extremes you've had to go to, then by all means she should. I was simply putting forth that doing a restrictive diet when dealing with a hormone imbalance may be risky and she should sort that before she worries about losing 20 lbs.

sarahsweets
08-29-16, 06:38 AM
Low carb, high fat and high protein is not healthy.

Ask your liver!

:-)

Better try it having no breakfast like some Vyvanse users or try what nature gave us. :-P

Salads are good but sauces are evil. Why not eating pure and raw vegetables. Carrots and peppers are tasty.
I dont think low carb is unhealthy and I didnt say it was going to be high fat. I had talked with my endochroninologist awhile back about a diabetic diet, only carbs that are unrefined and good for you. I dont mean no carbs, or dangerously low carbs, just a lot less. Not high fat though. And with the gastric bypass I have to eat more protein than some people to prevent hair loss, bone fragility and brittle nails- stuff like that.

C15H25N3O
08-29-16, 11:25 AM
http://www.rawkingoodfoodbyaudra.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/AudrasRawFoodPyramid.png

Eating like a monkey is enough for us. Everything else should be a controlled reward for being strong.
No easy task.