View Full Version : Am I employable?


MindBlind
08-29-16, 07:28 PM
The catalyst that led me to seek a diagnosis was shortly before I got fired for poor performance. I was given my final warning even though I worked really hard to improve. To this day I am still struggling to find employment.

I see that most of the jobs on offer require a lot of multitasking and good executive functions. I also don't work well under stress (that's the aspergers' fault) so I honestly have no idea what I'm good at. Even when it comes to stuff I'm qualified to do I still can't keep up with it. I'm not fast enough and I often miss details. The working world is just so demanding and I don't know how to catch up. My last job really messed me up and I was so stressed out that I had

My last job was my first ever real job (I had some work in the past but not consistent). I'm worried that I'm liable to get fired again for the same reason. I'm also worried that other employers won't hire me because I have a bad reputation.

How can I make myself more employable and how can I better manage my symptoms in a working environment?

PolaBear
08-29-16, 07:50 PM
Little off what you have said, but read so,etching about this the other day and something that stayed with me was a line that said "consistency and concentration" are where things are different and on a different level.

sarahsweets
08-30-16, 04:34 AM
Are you on medication?

MindBlind
08-30-16, 07:21 AM
Are you on medication?

Now I am. It's only a small dose of ritalin (5mg 3 times a day) just to start me off and I have seen some small change. But my psychiatrist has referred me to an occupational therapist to help me manage day to day stuff and work on mt goals for improvement. That's going to take a while before I can get my first appointment which is a bit frustrating because I'm really struggling right now. I hope I will get to see the therapist regularly because I need a lot of help to be able to manage employment without getting fired.

PolaBear
08-30-16, 06:39 PM
Ain't saying it wil nether same for you, but appointments take a lonnnnnnng time to get in my experience. Spoke to a DR who sent me to a consultant who sent me to "psychological services". None were experts of ADHD and the consultant I particular was very negative and answered most of what I said (long sentences) with "okkkkk then". At one appointment ended up having one heated argument with him over one thing or another, all he kept going on about was the history and controversy of ADHD and how I wouldn't get medication or assistance work wise. That guy retired and was contacted by another consultant who wanted to see me (I had long gone from there so this was a surprise). Gave it a shot speaking to him and the guy was more upbeat, but again the sentence was "I don't know how you want me to help you". Described difficulties in a repetitive job situation and was told to "ask whoever works there if you can switch roles for a while". No real u detests ding at all.

The crappy thing about it is it can be tough depending on where your head is at to get out what you want to say, no different to writing on here, but then to hear no u doers tanking at all to what you heard saying or referencing just got frustrating. At psychological services I would speak to someone about every 2/3 months (not regular appointments) and could tell that they were listening but not giving too much back, again was "I don't know what you want". Admitted they weren't an expert at this, but then didn't put me anywhere where someone was so in the end I was discharged. Actually have an appointment with the consultant on Monday but expecting nothing.

Can remember one thing mentioned was a scheme for people with issues getting into work, but this was for people with illnesses and injuries, or things like anxiety etc, there was no ADHD understanding there and I explained this to them, that it was finding an environment that works for me, not going into an environment that won't be and "adapting" or "putting up with it". Again the lack of understanding meant that I just got wrote as dismissive.

Ain't saying this will be the same for you though.

sarahsweets
08-31-16, 04:34 AM
Now I am. It's only a small dose of ritalin (5mg 3 times a day) just to start me off and I have seen some small change. But my psychiatrist has referred me to an occupational therapist to help me manage day to day stuff and work on mt goals for improvement. That's going to take a while before I can get my first appointment which is a bit frustrating because I'm really struggling right now. I hope I will get to see the therapist regularly because I need a lot of help to be able to manage employment without getting fired.

When you say occupational therapist do you mean occupational as in related to an occupation? Or do you mean it as in OT, similar to PT(physical therapy)?
If it is the OT kind, this would be something people might need for different learning disabilities, neurological issues, sensory issues, handwritting, stuff like that. My son and daughter both had OT in school and also PT.

MindBlind
08-31-16, 06:01 PM
When you say occupational therapist do you mean occupational as in related to an occupation? Or do you mean it as in OT, similar to PT(physical therapy)?
If it is the OT kind, this would be something people might need for different learning disabilities, neurological issues, sensory issues, handwritting, stuff like that. My son and daughter both had OT in school and also PT.

My psychiatrist referred me and he says that they would look at my needs holistically and try to create a plan that helps me with day to day stuff. I've read that occupational therapy is supposed to help you gain skills to gain more independence and self care skills. In my case I suppose the therapist is going to help me learn coping mechanisms and make the most out of what skills I do have. I also have aspergers so it might be useful for that as well.

I'm positive about the OT because it's tailored around my needs and give me tools to make the most out of my brain. It feels more hands on and proactive. CBT is good but it's more about changing thought patterns rather than improving cognitive abilities.

Lloyd_
09-01-16, 07:21 PM
My psychiatrist referred me and he says that they would look at my needs holistically and try to create a plan that helps me with day to day stuff. I've read that occupational therapy is supposed to help you gain skills to gain more independence and self care skills. In my case I suppose the therapist is going to help me learn coping mechanisms and make the most out of what skills I do have. I also have aspergers so it might be useful for that as well.

I'm positive about the OT because it's tailored around my needs and give me tools to make the most out of my brain. It feels more hands on and proactive. CBT is good but it's more about changing thought patterns rather than improving cognitive abilities.

I take it in the UK OT is what they call here in the states 'Job Corps' which is more or less a free public service you can enroll in at the unemployment office or as they say in the UK the job centre. ;)

MindBlind
09-07-16, 09:42 AM
I take it in the UK OT is what they call here in the states 'Job Corps' which is more or less a free public service you can enroll in at the unemployment office or as they say in the UK the job centre. ;)


No, OT is the same thing here as it is in the states. Occupational therapists don't just rehabilitate physically disabled people or severely mentally disabled people. They also help people with mental health problems (such as bipolar disorder) and milder mental health conditions manage their daily life and self care. I'm being referred because my symptoms cause me to be unable to function properly in my day to day life. I can't handle working in most jobs (even on a part time contract) and I struggle to maintain daily tasks such as doing daily chores, remembering to eat and pay bills. My symptoms also have an emotional effect on my life as I am often prone to extreme mood swings. On top of all of that I also have a dual diagnosis of Aspergers so I have deficits related to that which also affects my ability to function. The therapist is going to help me overcome my issues with my working memory and managing day to day tasks. I think I may be able to find tools to better manage meltdowns and mood swings, too.

It might also help to know that ADHD coaching isn't really something offered under the NHS. The OT a is probably the closest thing besides a counsellor to what I need.

Incidentally, I just talked to the shrink today. I am being referred to a clinic that specialises in Autism and they have expertise on handling ADHD dual diagnosis. I'm still on the waiting list for the OT but I have referred to this clinic because my shrink wants to be thorough with my diagnosis. Makes sense because he doesn't really specialise in autism and some of the symptoms do overlap. I've also changed from Ritalin to Concerta so hopefully that will be better because I won't have to remember to take pills throughout the day.

I just hope it turns out okay in the end.