View Full Version : Are the 504's not taken into account during punishment?


Caco3girl
09-01-16, 11:42 AM
My son just turned 14. He has been diagnosed with ADHD. On a typical day he finishes class and goes to Football practice. Yesterday he had to go take a make-up quiz in a class after school. After that he was walking with a female student and they were joking around. He took her phone and ran, she ran after, this is a game many of the students play.

My son wound up running into the girls bathroom, why, because it was the one that was straight ahead. To get to the boys bathroom he would have had to turn and all he was looking for was a door he could get behind. The girl ran in after him, they were laughing so loud a teacher came. Both students had the same version of what happened and agreed it wasn't the brightest move to run and do this in school.

This sounds like classic impulse control issues to me, his punishment, FIVE days of in school suspension. This seems bit extreme to me especially since it will take him out of his classes for 5 days in a row, where he already has issues concentrating. Do they not take the 504 into account during punishments?

Little Missy
09-01-16, 04:18 PM
My son just turned 14. He has been diagnosed with ADHD. On a typical day he finishes class and goes to Football practice. Yesterday he had to go take a make-up quiz in a class after school. After that he was walking with a female student and they were joking around. He took her phone and ran, she ran after, this is a game many of the students play.

My son wound up running into the girls bathroom, why, because it was the one that was straight ahead. To get to the boys bathroom he would have had to turn and all he was looking for was a door he could get behind. The girl ran in after him, they were laughing so loud a teacher came. Both students had the same version of what happened and agreed it wasn't the brightest move to run and do this in school.

This sounds like classic impulse control issues to me, his punishment, FIVE days of in school suspension. This seems bit extreme to me especially since it will take him out of his classes for 5 days in a row, where he already has issues concentrating. Do they not take the 504 into account during punishments?

I'd march in there and tell them to Pick Your Battles because this is not a battle worth picking. And don't leave until you get your way. Nicely.

namazu
09-01-16, 04:29 PM
For short-term punishments (<10 days), if there's not already something in the 504 plan about how behavioral issues will be handled, the short answer appears to be "no".

That said, there may be things you can do pre-emptively to prevent future problems, or to address a situation like this if it were to arise again.

Here's info from CHADD on Section 504, with a useful section on school discipline. (http://www.printfriendly.com/print/?source=homepage&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.chadd.org%2FUnderstanding-ADHD%2FFor-Parents-Caregivers%2FEducation%2FSection-504.aspx)

This page, from GreatSchools, is about discipline and students with IEPs (http://www.printfriendly.com/print/?source=homepage&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.greatschools.org%2Fgk%2Fartic les%2Fidea-2004-close-up-disciplining-students-with-disabilities%2F). Students with 504 plans may be eligible for some (if not all) of the same considerations as students with IEPs when the behaviors are a consequence of the disability.

Lunacie
09-01-16, 04:44 PM
In school suspension (sticking a kid in room all by himself) is NOT helpful for kids with special needs IMO.

We had a SE teacher one year who did not mesh well with my autistic granddaughter and she ended up in the ISS room.

After 3 hours (3!!!) the principal finally called us to come and get her. We had a talk that day about using ISS and asked for an emergency IEP meeting.

But we had an IEP and we could ask for things like that to be included. I don't know if 504 plans work that way.

aeon
09-01-16, 05:15 PM
I agree with Little Missy.

That said, back in the day, I always had a good reason to be in the girls’ bathroom, and so did the girls,
but those reasons certainly weren’t good ones to any of the adults. ;)

One time I got busted and when asked why I was in there, I told them straight up why, not hiding a thing.
And then one of the girls said “He’s telling the truth!” which was followed by a bit of giggling from her
friend.

My answer seemed to make the staff nervous and the three of us were told to get out of there and not
be found there again.

So if you are going to go in there, do it for something worthwhile that will get them in trouble if they
choose to punish you. :lol:


Happy Times,
Ian

Caco3girl
09-02-16, 10:33 AM
For short-term punishments (<10 days), if there's not already something in the 504 plan about how behavioral issues will be handled, the short answer appears to be "no".

That said, there may be things you can do pre-emptively to prevent future problems, or to address a situation like this if it were to arise again.

Here's info from CHADD on Section 504, with a useful section on school discipline. (http://www.printfriendly.com/print/?source=homepage&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.chadd.org%2FUnderstanding-ADHD%2FFor-Parents-Caregivers%2FEducation%2FSection-504.aspx)

This page, from GreatSchools, is about discipline and students with IEPs (http://www.printfriendly.com/print/?source=homepage&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.greatschools.org%2Fgk%2Fartic les%2Fidea-2004-close-up-disciplining-students-with-disabilities%2F). Students with 504 plans may be eligible for some (if not all) of the same considerations as students with IEPs when the behaviors are a consequence of the disability.

The only thing in the 504 about discipline pertains to needed extra redirecting DURING class. We had a big problem with write ups because the teacher would say take out your lit essay...and he would...but then he would start working on the drawing for the project rather than working on the essay portion. OR he would take out the essay and begin discussing football practice with his ext door neighbor. The teacher is suppose to redirect at that point and not just assume he isn't following her directions on purpose.