View Full Version : Is it worth going to college for 6 years to get a bachelor's degree?


Obsessive_ADD
09-09-16, 02:08 AM
My parents are able to pay for it, but it will probably take me 6 years or more.

This is specifically targeted at other non-hyperactive ADDers.

sarahsweets
09-09-16, 01:54 PM
Depends on what you want to do in life. If a career hinges on a degree and you know that you want to work in a specific fields then it can be great.

Fuzzy12
09-09-16, 01:59 PM
Like sarah said it depends on what you get out of it.

I never really enjoyed my first degree much and I've been considering studying medicine since the first year of my undergraduate degree. I never took the plunge though thinking that it's too late to study any long degree like medicine.

Now it probably is too late for me but thinking back until recently it would have definitely been worth investing 6 years that would mean that now I could be doing something that I love.

aeon
09-09-16, 02:47 PM
Current evidence suggests yes if the degree is STEM, otherwise, likely not.

This is, of course, a financial worth question.

If it means being in debt all your life so as to be happy and fulfilled, you may simply ignore this.


Cheers,
Ian

acdc01
09-09-16, 03:27 PM
Sarah is absolutely right. It's all about what job you want and whether you need a degree to do it.

Also, 6 years may feel like a lot to you now but it is really a blink of an eye compared to your whole life.

WheresMyMind
09-11-16, 02:19 PM
My parents are able to pay for it, but it will probably take me 6 years or more.

This is specifically targeted at other non-hyperactive ADDers.

Took me six years.

The experience was awesome...college was the first time in my life that I had a social life.

Having a degree versus not having one is huge.

Any job that gets posted online receives 200-1000 applicants. Nobody can read all of them. So, they create a "litmus test", within the HR software. An easy one is "does the person have a degree". Checking that box on the HR software cut down the list of applicants to any job I would have open from 1/3 to 2/3, depending on the job.

midnightstar
09-11-16, 02:50 PM
Current evidence suggests yes if the degree is STEM, otherwise, likely not.

This is, of course, a financial worth question.

If it means being in debt all your life so as to be happy and fulfilled, you may simply ignore this.


Cheers,
Ian

What's STEM mean? :scratch:

In answer to the question about going to college to get a degree, it depends what you want to do - sadly most jobs round here reject degree students (I heard this from other people, I personally don't have a degree)

Fuzzy12
09-11-16, 03:23 PM
What's STEM mean? :scratch:

In answer to the question about going to college to get a degree, it depends what you want to do - sadly most jobs round here reject degree students (I heard this from other people, I personally don't have a degree)

Science, technology, engineering and math.

MickeMouseFan
09-16-16, 08:23 PM
I am in the 3rd year of a 5 year engineering degree at university(also studying Chinese as a second major). I started university when I was 39 years old. For people with ADD, it will be a significant challenge. Due to my ADD, I spent weeknights and weekends studying, while other students can work and/or have a great social life. I studied so much that I burnt myself out in second year, but still got good grades.

Now I study much less and try to have more of a social life(the university social clubs are fabulous), and the result is that my grades have slipped from a distinction average. Still, my marks are as good as any student, and better than most. College/university a great way to meet lots of new people.

DJ Bill
09-16-16, 08:43 PM
My opinion on college....No, it is nowhere near as valuable as the cost today implies. Especially liberal arts degrees.....

Training in a specific field you know you are interested in and can make serious money in is a different matter. That's worth it usually.

You may want to start with some community college courses first just to see how you like it before you commit to the long haul.

Accumulating the debt a degree usually results in, will tend to be a heavy weight on your shoulders for a long, long time.

Little Missy
09-16-16, 09:02 PM
My opinion on college....No, it is nowhere near as valuable as the cost today implies. Especially liberal arts degrees.....

Training in a specific field you know you are interested in and can make serious money in is a different matter. That's worth it usually.

You may want to start with some community college courses first just to see how you like it before you commit to the long haul.

Accumulating the debt a degree usually results in, will tend to be a heavy weight on your shoulders for a long, long time.

He's right, BUT if you have exemplary grades you can get a full scholarship and never owe a penny.

Pugly
09-17-16, 02:31 AM
I think you need to have a clear plan, or at least some commitment to make a plan about what you want to get out of college. Which is to say what kind of career will this college degree help you with.

Those with a clear goal in mind and career path can do well. STEM is always nice, but it doesn't have to be that... medical careers are good. Business, marketing, accounting and whatnot are also nice job paths.

You also have to take advantage of what the college has to offer.

Personally I didn't do these things, and now I'm in a ton of debt and no real career options at the movement. This is even with a math degree... I went to college because I love learning things. To some extent it was worth it, because I'll always have my degree and the knowledge gained is kept with me. But the financial strife I'm in right now... ugh.

Even with parents paying for it, I don't think I would be comfortable going to college without a clear goal in mind.

ExitMyReality88
01-02-17, 03:41 AM
My parents are able to pay for it, but it will probably take me 6 years or more.

This is specifically targeted at other non-hyperactive ADDers.

As others have said, it depends on what you want to get out it. Regardless of what you do, it generally looks good to have a degree under your belt--but you also should consider the time factor and how well you will do in which ever field you choose.

If you want to go into medicine/nursing, engineering, law, scientific disclipines, etc then you definitely should pursue it, especially if it is paid for.

Just be realistic with your goals, only take a manageable courseload per semester, and don't burn yourself out.

I started taking college courses at 18 turning 19 and I'm 28 right now. I've gone through a ton of community college courses, distant learning online courses and regular university courses. In hindsight I could have done things a lot better, streamlined and condensed things---but I didn't really know what I was doing at that point in time.