View Full Version : An open discussion about moods.


mildadhd
09-11-16, 08:22 PM
Everyone has moods (ADHD or not)

This thread is meant to discuss and learn about moods, what are moods?, etc..

I really have not focused much on the topic of moods until very recently.

Any random information that we could discuss that might help understand and be more aware of our moods, appreciated.

(Preferred definition of moods, physiology of moods, quotes from our favourite researchers about moods, etc..)


G

Greyhound1
09-11-16, 11:59 PM
Interesting topic. I tried to think of all the complexities involved in our moods and was overwhelmed. My mood went down.

I looked around and found this and it went back up a little.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/8275897/

Unmanagable
09-12-16, 09:28 AM
One of the most enlightening books I've ever read was "The Food-Mood Solution", by Jack Challem. Food choices have made a difference in my moods and overall functioning ability, more than I can ever successfully express in writing. I remain my own walking and talking result, be it considered scientific enough by others, or not. Below is quoted from the website about the book:

You don't need a study to tell you the obvious: people's moods have gone south. They’re more impatient, irritable, and angry. The reason: a disastrous combination of stress and poor nutrition.

Why and how you ask? Nutrients form the building blocks of neurotransmitters, the brain chemicals that regulate our moods and thinking processes. When people get stressed and eat too many nutrient-poor junk foods, their moods and ability to think clearly can become compromised.

The result may include irritability, impatience, anger, anxiety, panic attacks, impulsivity, distractibility, depression, fuzzy thinking, addictive behaviors, and mood swings.

The Food-Mood Solution explains how too much stress, too little time, and too many junk foods set the stage for bad moods and behavior — what Jack often calls "pissy mood syndrome."

His four-step program to improve moods goes far beyond the roles of diet and supplements in improving moods. The book also describes easy ways to incorporate physical activity into your day and suggests dozens of small but important lifestyle changes that help insulate you against stress.



I didn't follow his four steps as a formal program, nor did I heed his advice until AFTER experiencing a major medical emergency that prompted drastic changes, but did clearly, and rather quickly, notice a huge improved difference in how I felt and handled my emotions once I eliminated the food stuffs we should never have been taught to ingest in the first place.

mildadhd
09-12-16, 10:25 PM
good odd mood ode

Past moods?

Present moods?

Future moods?

Moods with an s?

Mood without an s?

Goods moods foods.

:)

I am really enjoying thinking about this discussion.

G

mildadhd
09-12-16, 11:10 PM
Are moods partly arousal of different combinations of emotional, homeostatic and sensory feelings?

Moods that feel good when aroused?

Moods that feel bad when aroused?

Moods that feel good when overaroused?

Moods that feel bad when overaroused?

Moods that feel good when underaroused?

Moods that feel bad when underaroused?

Is tired a mood?

G

mildadhd
09-12-16, 11:23 PM
Interesting topic. I tried to think of all the complexities involved in our moods and was overwhelmed. My mood went down.

I looked around and found this and it went back up a little.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/8275897/

There are tonnes interesting topics to discuss when I consider this thread/posts discussion so so far.

I am stuck on moods with an s, and mood without an s, at the moment.

:)

mildadhd
09-12-16, 11:36 PM
One of the most enlightening books I've ever read was "The Food-Mood Solution", by Jack Challem. Food choices have made a difference in my moods and overall functioning ability, more than I can ever successfully express in writing. I remain my own walking and talking result, be it considered scientific enough by others, or not. Below is quoted from the website about the book:



I didn't follow his four steps as a formal program, nor did I heed his advice until AFTER experiencing a major medical emergency that prompted drastic changes, but did clearly, and rather quickly, notice a huge improved difference in how I felt and handled my emotions once I eliminated the food stuffs we should never have been taught to ingest in the first place.

Over the last year or so?

I have begun to consciously want spinach, etc, everyday, I noticed it helps calm me down.

I already have spinach packed in my lunch for tommorrow.

Makes a huge difference in my short term mood(s?).

Been still thinking of avoiding, sugar, bread and milk for years?

Something addictive about these bad mood foods, that I need to learn to be more aware.

Appreciate the perspective.

G

Greyhound1
09-12-16, 11:41 PM
Do hormones affect mood or does mood affect hormones? Both perhaps?

It's hard to think about moods without connecting them with emotions.

Do emotions control mood or does mood control emotions? Both perhaps?

Are mood and emotions the same thing? If not, how are they interconnected?

Just some food for thought. Food affects mood.:doh: The more I think about it the deeper it gets.

mildadhd
09-12-16, 11:58 PM
I am learning It helps me to think of things in 3's.

Example.

3 types of primary affects

-emotional affects
-homeostatic affects
-sensory affects

Although it is bugging me at the moment, that I do not know where feeling tired fits?

Primarily homeostatic affect ? (Not sure at all?)

G

mildadhd
09-13-16, 12:05 AM
Do hormones affect mood or does mood affect hormones? Both perhaps?

It's hard to think about moods without connecting them with emotions.

Do emotions control mood or does mood control emotions? Both perhaps?

Are mood and emotions the same thing? If not, how are they interconnected?

Just some food for thought. Food affects mood.:doh: The more I think about it the deeper it gets.

Might have something partly due to, things above blood brain barrier and things below the blood brain barrier?

G

Hermus
09-13-16, 06:31 AM
Do hormones affect mood or does mood affect hormones? Both perhaps?

It's hard to think about moods without connecting them with emotions.

Do emotions control mood or does mood control emotions? Both perhaps?

Are mood and emotions the same thing? If not, how are they interconnected?

Just some food for thought. Food affects mood.:doh: The more I think about it the deeper it gets.

The difference between emotions and moods is something I thought about. Might it be that emotions are an immediate and temporary response to something that is happening, while moods are more general and longer lasting?

BellaVita
09-13-16, 06:51 AM
Is "mood" just a vague term for a group of x emotions one might be feeling for an extended period of time?

Like "bad mood" could mean the person feels many emotions: angry, anxious, stressed, depressed, etc. and many combinations of these or experiencing them at different points in the "bad mood."

Just some mood for thought. (Greyhound your post gave me that idea. :p)

Edit - I do realize that I kinda just said what Hermus said. :o

Unmanagable
09-13-16, 08:50 AM
Do hormones affect mood or does mood affect hormones? Both perhaps?

It's hard to think about moods without connecting them with emotions.

Do emotions control mood or does mood control emotions? Both perhaps?

Are mood and emotions the same thing? If not, how are they interconnected?

Just some food for thought. Food affects mood.:doh: The more I think about it the deeper it gets.

Speaking of hormones, take some time to research our current food supply, as well as other products used in our homes and on our bodies daily, and check out the endocrine disruptors.

http://www.niehs.nih.gov/health/topics/agents/endocrine/

It all ripples out and greatly affects us, be it energetically, mentally, physically, or however it reaches us. Rest assured, it reaches us in many ways.

Little Missy
09-13-16, 08:57 AM
I have a real problem with anyone using someone else's mood as a basis for anything.

Have a good mood today.

Lunacie
09-13-16, 09:23 AM
I do understand that food may influence mood ... certainly being hungry effects mood.

But does anyone else experience smells effecting mood?

I don't mean associating perfume with a pleasant memory or triggering a flashback to a bad memory.

I mean simply smelling perfume (air freshener, aftershave, etc) makes me very teary, weepy, blue, depressed ... emotionally overwrought.

I remember calling the local mental health center to ask if they'd stop using their plug-in air freshener, and I was crying because I didn't wait until the perfume-inspired mood had passed.

Unmanagable
09-13-16, 09:55 AM
I do understand that food may influence mood ... certainly being hungry effects mood.

But does anyone else experience smells effecting mood?

I don't mean associating perfume with a pleasant memory or triggering a flashback to a bad memory.

I mean simply smelling perfume (air freshener, aftershave, etc) makes me very teary, weepy, blue, depressed ... emotionally overwrought.

I remember calling the local mental health center to ask if they'd stop using their plug-in air freshener, and I was crying because I didn't wait until the perfume-inspired mood had passed.

Very much so. I've had to call several places, too. Cleaning products, laundry products, hygiene products, hair products, candles, etc. Endocrine disruptors are a b****.

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2013/hormone_disrupting_20130219/en/


Some substances can alter the hormonal system

Human health depends on a well-functioning endocrine system to regulate the release of certain hormones that are essential for functions such as metabolism, growth and development, sleep and mood.

Some substances known as endocrine disruptors can alter the function(s) of this hormonal system increasing the risk of adverse health effects.

Some EDCs occur naturally, while synthetic varieties can be found in pesticides, electronics, personal care products and cosmetics.

They can also be found as additives or contaminants in food.

The UN study, which is the most comprehensive report on EDCs to date, highlights some associations between exposure to EDCs and health problems including the potential for such chemicals to contribute to the development of non-descended testes in young males, breast cancer in women, prostate cancer in men, developmental effects on the nervous system in children, attention deficit /hyperactivity in children and thyroid cancer.


Edited to add:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_7RfgJhvyow

Little Missy
09-13-16, 09:58 AM
I had a doctor mention my mood and suggest a prescription for it once when getting a refill for an asthma inhaler. Take care of your own mood and I'll take care of mine.

Now I'm in a bad mood just thinking of that 10 years ago. Clown.

Greyhound1
09-13-16, 11:15 AM
The difference between emotions and moods is something I thought about. Might it be that emotions are an immediate and temporary response to something that is happening, while moods are more general and longer lasting?

I agree with you that emotions seem immediate and moods last longer. I know for me they can significantly influence one another. Enough thoughts and emotions will effect my mood. Also, my mood can greatly effect my thoughts and emotions. For me it's a complex relationship to say the least.

I looked them up and found this. I think you nailed it Hermus. Time is the main difference.

Mood
by Joshua Freedman | Jan 2, 2015
What’s the difference between an emotion, a feeling, and mood?
Simple answer: Time.
Emotions are chemicals released in response to our interpretation of a specific trigger. It takes our brains about 1/4 second to identify the trigger, and about another 1/4 second to produce the chemicals. By the way, emotion chemicals are released throughout our bodies, not just in our brains, and they form a kind of feedback loop between our brains & bodies. They last for about six seconds.
Feelings happen as we begin to integrate the emotion, to think about it, to “let it soak in.” In English, we use “feel” for both physical and emotional sensation — we can say we physically feel cold, but we can also emotionally feel cold. This is a clue to the meaning of “feeling,” it’s something we sense. Feelings are more “cognitively saturated” as the emotion chemicals are processed in our brains & bodies. Feelings are often fueled by a mix of emotions, and last for longer than emotions.

Moods are more generalized. They’re not tied to a specific incident, but a collection of inputs. Mood is heavily influenced by our environment (weather, lighting, color, people around us), by our physiology (what we’ve been eating, how we’ve been exercising, if we have a cold or not, how well we slept), by our thinking (where we’re focusing attention), and by our current emotions. Moods can last minutes, hours, probably even days.

BellaVita
09-13-16, 09:39 PM
Speaking of foods....ever since I was little, certain foods make me angry.

Yes, angry.

When I was a small child, it was certain dairy products like ice cream, milk, etc. after I would consume it I would get very irritable and angry and have bad meltdowns. And when I'd start having one of those anger meltdowns, someone would ask "did she eat dairy?" :o

It kind of stopped for a few years (I also switched to Soymilk etc.) and I was able to have some dairy products.

After I went vegan for a while, and decided to eat some dairy again, it happened again.

I had some Reese's candy and I got very irritable. I also had Cool Whip a separate time with strawberries and it made me angry. And then I had a McDonalds hot fudge Sunday and that also made me angry. And these moods aren't like 5-minute anger bursts, they last for hours.

I avoid Cool Whip and those hot fudge Sunday's like the plague now. (It's weird because I used to eat the McDonald's hot fudge Sunday's as a kid - they must've changed an ingredient)

Unfortunately my beautiful wedding cake also had some strange reaction in me, and I could only eat a partial piece because I felt the distinct irritability kicking in and didn't want to escalate it. Oh well, at least it made for some pretty pictures. :)

I still don't know why certain things make me angry, I've read online a blog post by someone who also experiences it though. (with dairy products) I would like to one day try to single out the ingredient so I know to avoid it.

Oh, and I am lactose intolerant (have always been!) but I take a daily lactose defense formula pill that also contains probiotics and so I can handle most dairy products. But the pill doesn't stop my strange anger reaction to certain foods so I have to avoid those.

Greyhound1
09-13-16, 10:37 PM
Speaking of foods....ever since I was little, certain foods make me angry.

Yes, angry.

When I was a small child, it was certain dairy products like ice cream, milk, etc. after I would consume it I would get very irritable and angry and have bad meltdowns. And when I'd start having one of those anger meltdowns, someone would ask "did she eat dairy?" :o

It kind of stopped for a few years (I also switched to Soymilk etc.) and I was able to have some dairy products.

After I went vegan for a while, and decided to eat some dairy again, it happened again.

I had some Reese's candy and I got very irritable. I also had Cool Whip a separate time with strawberries and it made me angry. And then I had a McDonalds hot fudge Sunday and that also made me angry. And these moods aren't like 5-minute anger bursts, they last for hours.

I avoid Cool Whip and those hot fudge Sunday's like the plague now. (It's weird because I used to eat the McDonald's hot fudge Sunday's as a kid - they must've changed an ingredient)

Unfortunately my beautiful wedding cake also had some strange reaction in me, and I could only eat a partial piece because I felt the distinct irritability kicking in and didn't want to escalate it. Oh well, at least it made for some pretty pictures. :)

I still don't know why certain things make me angry, I've read online a blog post by someone who also experiences it though. (with dairy products) I would like to one day try to single out the ingredient so I know to avoid it.

Oh, and I am lactose intolerant (have always been!) but I take a daily lactose defense formula pill that also contains probiotics and so I can handle most dairy products. But the pill doesn't stop my strange anger reaction to certain foods so I have to avoid those.

I am sorry Bella :grouphug:. All the foods you mentioned make me happy

Do any foods effect your mood in a positive way or make you happy?

BellaVita
09-13-16, 10:47 PM
I am sorry Bella :grouphug:. All the foods you mentioned make me happy

Do any foods effect your mood in a positive way or make you happy?

Yeah, I feel a bit sad about the McDonald's hot fudge Sunday's, I used to get them as a kid with extra hot fudge and didn't really have problems. (Except for some tummy troubles maybe)

Hmmm. Foods that make me happy....

Eating food is often an enjoyable experience for me, when it is something I really like. And it can make me feel happy.

But not in a weird way, just in the "normal" way I think. (Although I can get pretty child-like excited before eating certain foods. :D)

I think the anger thing is some sort of sensitivity to a chemical.

Unmanagable
09-14-16, 09:45 AM
Stumbled across this today and thought of this thread. I share it in the spirit of it showing more info regarding the connection between the gut and the nervous system.

I had been diagnosed with severe IBS and nervous stomach, neither of which have been an issue since transitioning to plant-based eating.

Interestingly, I noticed they would seem to flare up much worse during times of overwhelming stress, prior to the diet change, as I drowned in a sea of ever changing emotions, hence the "nervous stomach" and IBS diagnosis from the doc who never discussed food.

Even when I become super stressed now, I no longer suffer with the stomach issues, so I feel the diet was definitely the most effective change agent for me, which also naturally helped me to improve moods and emotional regulation, like a domino effect of sorts:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4367209/

Strong evidence suggests that gut microbiota has an important role in bidirectional interactions between the gut and the nervous system.

It interacts with CNS by regulating brain chemistry and influencing neuro-endocrine systems associated with stress response, anxiety and memory function.

Many of these effects appear to be strain-specific, suggesting a potential role of certain probiotic strains as novel adjuvant strategy for neurologic disorders.

In addition, the effects of CNS on microbiota composition are likely mediated by a perturbation of the normal luminal/mucosal habitat that can also be restored by the use of probiotics and possibly by diet.

In clinical practice, an example of this interaction is constituted by FGID, in particular IBS, now considered a microbiome-GBA disorder.

mildadhd
09-14-16, 09:14 PM
Visceral involuntary (autonomic nervous system) primary affective response systems + subjective experiences = types of moods?

G

mildadhd
09-14-16, 09:53 PM
Great discussions.

Check out this chart.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autonomic_nervous_system#Innervation


G

mildadhd
09-14-16, 10:12 PM
The autonomic nervous system (ANS) is a division of the peripheral nervous system that influences the function of internal organs.[1] The autonomic nervous system is a control system that acts largely unconsciously and regulates bodily functions such as the heart rate, digestion, respiratory rate, pupillary response, urination, and sexual arousal. This system is the primary mechanism in control of the fight-or-flight response and the freeze-and-dissociate response.[2]

Angry moods and anxious moods.

RAGE/fight/angeries and FEAR/flight/anxieties


G

mildadhd
09-15-16, 08:17 AM
Emotional/sensory/homeostatic moods?

Homeostatic/emotional/sensory moods?

Sensory/homeostatic/emotional moods?


G?

mildadhd
09-16-16, 12:15 AM
Primary emotional affect--->Secondary emotional affective feelings/moods?


G?

mildadhd
09-18-16, 07:58 PM
The connection(s?) between the gut-brain/brain-gut goes both ways, partly depending on the type of stimulus and the type of emotionally sensitive temperament of the individuals brain-gut/gut-brain?

I am not sure physiologically, how the connections go both ways, or what other parts are also involved, etc, yet.

Thoughts?

The gut-brain connection

Have you ever had a "gut-wrenching" experience? Do certain situations make you "feel nauseous"? Have you ever felt "butterflies" in your stomach? We use these expressions for a reason. The gastrointestinal tract is sensitive to emotion. Anger, anxiety, sadness, elation — all of these feelings (and others) can trigger symptoms in the gut.

The brain has a direct effect on the stomach. For example, the very thought of eating can release the stomach's juices before food gets there. This connection goes both ways. A troubled intestine can send signals to the brain, just as a troubled brain can send signals to the gut. Therefore, a person's stomach or intestinal distress can be the cause or the product of anxiety, stress, or depression. That's because the brain and the gastrointestinal (GI) system are intimately connected.

This is especially true in cases where a person experiences gastrointestinal upset with no obvious physical cause. For such functional GI disorders, it is difficult to try to heal a distressed gut without considering the role of stress and emotion.

http://www.health.harvard.edu/healthbeat/the-gut-brain-connection

G?

SB_UK
09-19-16, 02:32 PM
The difference between emotions and moods is something I thought about. Might it be that emotions are an immediate and temporary response to something that is happening, while moods are more general and longer lasting?

sounds like the defn of a neuro and an endocrine.

SB_UK
09-19-16, 02:38 PM
The connection(s?) between the gut-brain/brain-gut goes both ways, partly depending on the type of stimulus and the type of emotionally sensitive temperament of the individuals brain-gut/gut-brain?

I am not sure physiologically, how the connections go both ways, or what other parts are also involved, etc, yet.

Thoughts?



G?

gut <-> brain

gut and brain - 2 bits of a person
What's the point of a person ?
To create cf creator (big enchilada in the interverse)

A particular type of brain food and of gut food is required.

Brain (mind) food - how to be creative, moral and sensitive
Gut food - appears to be prebiotic + probiotic

gut food -> short chain fatty acids -> brain food

gut -> brain -> mind connection formed.

Brain (mind) food to avoid - any system that furthers addiction ie pursuit money,power
Gut food to avoid - any food which is laden with stimulant (sugar, starch), narcotic (alcohol, dairy, wheat) or is completely unnatural (a bucketful of glutamate).

Brain food to avoid - excitotoxin (glutamate, sugar, starch, caffeine -- the stimulant class) and narcotic class.

-*-

So - 2 systems
[1] (gut, brain) - sorted by embracing leafy greens, inulin and lactobacillus fermented cabbage
[2] mind - sorted by embracing morality, creativity and personal quality

Thing is - don't mix 'em up - the physical form and the higher mental form aren't for squishing together. Though try and get a mind without a body and all sortsa' horid things will happen mostly involving drowning in a sea of unautophaged detritus.

note - switch to SCFA metabolism should mimic ketosis (starvation state autophagy promotion)

SB_UK
09-19-16, 02:50 PM
Exactly


Strong evidence suggests that gut microbiota has an important role in bidirectional interactions between the gut and the nervous system.

It interacts with CNS by regulating brain chemistry and influencing neuro-endocrine systems associated with stress response, anxiety and memory function.

Many of these effects appear to be strain-specific, suggesting a potential role of certain probiotic strains as novel adjuvant strategy for neurologic disorders.

In addition, the effects of CNS on microbiota composition are likely mediated by a perturbation of the normal luminal/mucosal habitat that can also be restored by the use of probiotics and possibly by diet.

In clinical practice, an example of this interaction is constituted by FGID, in particular IBS, now considered a microbiome-GBA disorder.

mildadhd
10-10-16, 02:13 AM
Thank you.

Internal emotional gut environment, stimulates emotional moods systems, in our brains'?

External emotional environment, stimulates emotional moods systems, in our brains'?



G?

mildadhd
10-14-16, 12:37 AM
So there are at least 3 possible origins?

Something in the internal emotional gut environment?
Something in the emotional systems within the brain?
Something in the external emotional environment?


G