View Full Version : Can anyone help me learn or re-learn or how to like running again?


sarahsweets
09-13-16, 06:04 AM
A year and a half ago I was doing really great at the gym. My cardio was running on the tread mill. I have always hated running but it was the only thing I could do with consistency. I had to stop the gym for financial and health reasons but I need to get going again. I liked the results even though I hated working out. Before I impulsively join the gym again I want some advice. What can I do to get moving and like it again. I did get the runners high a bit but it took time. With all the stress I'm under I know it will help.

Xxxooo

WheresMyMind
09-13-16, 09:57 PM
I struggled with the gym, too. 30 years ago, though, a co-worker invited me to join him in a lunchtime run - outdoors. No motivation problems since then.

The measurable improvement in our immune systems and brain chemistry when we do cardio outdoors is huge. Runner's high happens, for me, in the first few minutes and just stays with me.

Hope that is food for thought thought.

WMM WMM

C15H25N3O
09-13-16, 10:13 PM
You could start running outside in nature for free. Motivation comes on its own from progress and success.

You could work on your lap-time to get faster and to get moving. When you are into it you will feel a need for it like a mental addiction to move.

Running feels best with empty stomach and gut not carrying a load of food while the digestion takes a lot of energy.

When you are into running and it becomes cold you will enjoy the gym and maybe you will leave it in early spring for running again.

Best tools for motivation are new running shoes that need to be tested and a heart rate monitor to see the progress in heart rate and time .

Runners highwill show up after 5-15 minutes and increases dopamine.

TheFitFatty
09-18-16, 02:16 AM
I used to run a lot too, but stopped with my pregnancies and just couldn't get back into it for ages.

I'm still not where I was, because I find it hurts my hips if I run too long/hard. But I've gotten into weight lifting and now I'm running as a way of supporting that. Is there anything else you'd like to try?

Unmanagable
09-18-16, 08:54 AM
I can't walk for long distances or run because of bone spurs. However, the mini-trampoline makes it easy and fun, and I don't have to leave home to go to another place to do it. Bonus! It's part of my living room decor.

It can be used indoors or outdoors. I found mine by placing an ad on craigslist asking if anyone had one collecting dust. I scored an Urban Rebounder with a safety bar and instructional dvds for $50, which is just a few dollars more than the monthly fee for membership at the gym. It gets used damn near daily. Which is much more than I can say for all of my previous gym memberships. lol I typically add some hula-hooping to that, and it's one hell of a workout.

burger
09-20-16, 07:05 PM
I found cardio on machines really boring. I find cardio easier to do if I can move around a lot.

If you want to try the style I seem to like you can try a moderate-easy workout

https://www.fitnessblender.com/videos/at-home-cardio-workout-to-burn-fat-and-tone-high-and-low-impact-modifications

GoalieMel33
09-21-16, 12:07 PM
I can relate, I've always been more into sports and used to find physical activity repetitive and boring. Since I started the gym, I found ways to keep interest in my workouts.

What worked for me was varying what I do (switching between two programs, doing intervals/hills/holding elliptical's handle vs letting go, etc), increasing difficulty when it gets easier (another user mentionned challenging your lap time, which is great. You can also create goals like preparing for a 5k, for example) as well as pumping myself up with music which gets me through parts like spinning bike (I tried to put it on while on the treadmill but hearing my breathing distracts me).

If you are the social type of person, you might enjoy finding a running partner or track/outdoors group, or if you have an active dog they can be great jogging campanions too.

To stay motivated, it's important to start and progress slowly, if the task feels like a chore we're not likely to stick to it , even less if it's something we don't naturally like.

If you're training outside you might benefit from choosing an environment in which you feel safe, comfortable and stimulating (or trying new places, changing grounds, sometimes).

acdc01
09-21-16, 07:50 PM
Are your health reasons for quitting running gone?

I don't know if I'm just unlucky but most of the outdoor joggers (not softer treadmill) I know have long term injuries to their knees or feet.

What was it about jogging (which you say you hated) that made it so you could do it consistently in the past?

I just wonder if you could find an exercise you don't hate but can still do consistently. Knowing what helps you to be consistent could be a start in finding that exercise if you wanted to try something besides running.

EDIT: do you know if your health insurance covers the cost of a gym membership? I looked up the government sponsored discounted health care insurance one time due to a post here. The cheapest insurance in my area actually gave free gym membership as well.

aeon
09-21-16, 08:10 PM
I don't know if I'm just unlucky but most of the outdoor joggers (not softer treadmill) I know have long term injuries to their knees or feet.

Thatís because running is what you do to get away from a bear...a short-term activity designed to save your life.

Do that long-term and you will destroy your body, simple as that.

Or so said my Dr.ís friend who is a Dr. and orthopedist.


Cheers,
Ian

Unmanagable
09-21-16, 10:14 PM
Thatís because running is what you do to get away from a bear...a short-term activity designed to save your life.

Do that long-term and you will destroy your body, simple as that.

Or so said my Dr.ís friend who is a Dr. and orthopedist.


Cheers,
Ian

:lol:

Ain't it the truth. I often tell folks if you see me running, you damn well better run, too!!

I have a cousin and a friend who ran track and still tries to do marathons here and there, in between corrective knee surgeries and such. Ouch.

Those must be the folks into the pain scene, perhaps? I remain allergic to it.

C15H25N3O
09-25-16, 03:51 AM
Knees and ankles are no shock absorbers but moderate running is ok if the muscles do their job.
When the muscles become limp you can make damage to your joints. Stop running if you feel
pain it will become worse. It is also a lot about the correct running technics which must be learned
either from self-reflection or running-school.

Running is our natural motion to be at home before darkness and to catch food by hands.

sarahsweets
09-25-16, 06:03 AM
I struggled with the gym, too. 30 years ago, though, a co-worker invited me to join him in a lunchtime run - outdoors. No motivation problems since then.

The measurable improvement in our immune systems and brain chemistry when we do cardio outdoors is huge. Runner's high happens, for me, in the first few minutes and just stays with me.

Hope that is food for thought thought.

WMM WMM

I did get a runners high I think but it took awhile.

sarahsweets
09-25-16, 06:04 AM
You could start running outside in nature for free. Motivation comes on its own from progress and success.

You could work on your lap-time to get faster and to get moving. When you are into it you will feel a need for it like a mental addiction to move.

Running feels best with empty stomach and gut not carrying a load of food while the digestion takes a lot of energy.

When you are into running and it becomes cold you will enjoy the gym and maybe you will leave it in early spring for running again.

Best tools for motivation are new running shoes that need to be tested and a heart rate monitor to see the progress in heart rate and time .

Runners highwill show up after 5-15 minutes and increases dopamine.

Yes, I love being outside but I am leary of wearing my head phones, yet I love music. Its a good distraction.

sarahsweets
09-25-16, 06:09 AM
Are your health reasons for quitting running gone?
No. I know how good my mood was and energy was and I want to lose an extra 20lbs. I have been doing great with my eating.

What was it about jogging (which you say you hated) that made it so you could do it consistently in the past?

Thats what I have to figure out. Maybe it was the gym environment, maybe I was enjoying being sober and wanted to change everything. My health issues have brought me down as well as an all or nothing attitude which I need to get over.
I just wonder if you could find an exercise you don't hate but can still do consistently. Knowing what helps you to be consistent could be a start in finding that exercise if you wanted to try something besides running.

I'm thinking I should start by walking. I am an early riser so I think once the time changes and there is more sun in the early morning, it will be easier. I have always been at my best in the morning.

EDIT: do you know if your health insurance covers the cost of a gym membership? I looked up the government sponsored discounted health care insurance one time due to a post here. The cheapest insurance in my area actually gave free gym membership as well.
Im not sure if they do. I know the employees at the university my husband works at, they are allowed to have a reduced fee gym membership but its in Princeton, NJ which isnt very close to us.

sarahsweets
09-25-16, 06:10 AM
BTW I am not talking miles and marathons. Just a couple. My best was only 2.5 in 30 minutes and thats ok with me.

TheDreamer
09-27-16, 05:20 AM
I ran a 5K about a week ago and I still feel the after effects (in a negative way). So running is certainly hard on the body - if you go over the limit you're trained for.

I've ran 10K races before (even 21K a couple of times) so I thought 5K would be easy since I've been jogging and doing other sports regularly lately - not so. I did get the runner's high directly afterwards though.

TygerSan
09-27-16, 08:27 AM
I think the biggest thing for people starting over is to let go of where you were. It's horribly hard to do, but being kind to yourself and not beating yourself up for not being where you want to be is key. (Hahah! Do as I say, not as I do. Applying this logic to myself is really difficult).

Running is one of those things that's a habit, and you have to ingrain that habit. So set out to go out for 30 minutes or however long you have/want to go. If you can't run, walk. If you have 3 days a week to devote, you could do something akin to the Couch to 5k program. If you do that program by time rather than distance, you end up where you hypothetically should be able to run 30 minutes at a time non-stop. When I finished the program, I was running around 2.5 miles in that time.

The social aspect of running keeps me going as well. I joined a group out of a local running store. It's expensive for the longer distances, but it works for me (I don't belong to a gym) and gives a group of people who meet twice a week.

There may be local running clubs in your area that do the same thing. The club local to us has a Couch to 5k group that meets at least once a week. It is much a much less expensive option than the running groups out of the store (dues and a small fee for the group). It is also much more casual.

I cannot run on a treadmill (I hurt myself in all sorts of interesting ways. Something about the repetitive motion). . . Running in the rain is both my most and least favorite thing to do depending on my mood and the temperature.

I started by running 30 minutes 3X a week. Finished my first 5k in 39 minutes. That was 3 years ago and 50/60 pounds ago. I am now staring down the barrel of my second full marathon. I fully admit that I am insane. But running is one of the things that keeps me sane.

Also, for the longest time when someone asked me if I liked running I'd say "It feels so good when I stop." I still find it hard to muster the motivation to get out the door sometimes. But once I get into a rhythm, everything falls into place (not always, mind you, there are always terrible running days).

One of the things people inevitably do when starting out is run too fast. You need to be able to talk when you're running. If you can't, you're running too fast and you're going to burn out. Even if you're doing C25k intervals, those run intervals aren't full-on sprints.

TygerSan
09-27-16, 03:51 PM
I'm hesitant to suggest this (afterthought) as I trip on pure air sometimes, but have you thought about trail-running?

It's a whole different beast and you have to be acutely aware of your surroundings, watching each footfall. It's slower, and more meditative.

It's something that I'd be hesitant to do alone as a woman, sadly. My husband and I do this thing where I run and he hikes, and it works out okay.