View Full Version : Do you know of a good "non-addictive" sleep aid?


Irene Iesu
09-16-16, 04:31 PM
After trying four different SNRI/SSRIs, I've settled for the combination of Bupropion + Prozac, and it seems to be working well for me so far ... but there's this one problem.

I tend to oversleep when I'm depressed (total lack of energy and motivation). Bupropion is helping to correct that aspect. It keeps me wakeful all through the day and I don't feel like lying down in the middle of the day like I used to. But now I have a hard time falling asleep at night, which was never a problem before. I've been using Xanax (prescribed for my anxiety issue) to sleep but it's highly addictive, so I don't want to develop a dependence on it. I've tried melatonin, but it doesn't do much for me.

I'm thinking of asking my doctor for some kind of sedative that I can take on an as-needed basis, and I'm wondering if anyone can recommend me something. I'd like to do my own research and know what are available (and if my insurance covers, etc) before I talk to my doctor. Any input is appreciated. :)

C15H25N3O
09-17-16, 09:29 AM
Ask your doc if you can use melatonin on your medication.

sarahsweets
09-17-16, 10:02 AM
The best non addictive sleep aid I ever have used is to
a-get a slee study done to check for issues.
b- go through some consistent sleep training
c- melatonin with good sleep hygeine.

excel
09-17-16, 10:03 PM
My sleep doctor told be to take melatonin 2 hours before bedtime for my insomnia. I also have sleep apnea. He doesn't like giving sleeping pills

Gypsy Willow
05-16-17, 11:41 AM
Hydroxizine

RextheDog
05-16-17, 12:26 PM
I use 1 melatonin and one benadryl. It works about 80% of the time for me.

Pihlaja
05-16-17, 12:49 PM
Non-medical sleep aid you might want to try:

I listen to sleep meditation tracks from youtube. Sometimes they work, sometimes they don't but listening to them is calming. I've liked this one recently: https://youtu.be/e7wLBpDeo1Y

Arei
06-08-17, 10:52 PM
I'm trying trazodone now. I just started so I can't say much yet but I want my sleep back :( if this doesn't work then I'll have to try lunesta or ambien (which can be addictive). I was always an oversleeper until I started using Wellbutrin XL. I don't like this feeling of not being able to fall and stay asleep :(

Greyhound1
06-08-17, 11:56 PM
Trazadone works great for me but it's tricky. It's also very strong. I took half the prescribed dose the first time and slept for almost 18 hours ruining the next day.

It has also left me feeling tired and a bit hungover the following day and even kept me up all night as well. I found through research and experience that for me taking it 1-2 hours before bed and eating a carbohydrate based snack about 30 minutes after taking dose works the best.

Kunga Dorji
06-09-17, 01:10 AM
Once you have done the basic sleep hygeine things and ensured a reasonable level of exercise there are a range of non medication approaches that will help
- relaxation exercises
- sleep hypnosis mp3
binaural beats- aimed to push the brain into a brainwave pattern more appropriate for sleep

They are all cheap, readily available and they all take a week or two perseverance to get best results

Medications generally will be only a short term solution before tolerance sets in.

Greyhound1
06-09-17, 01:27 AM
I agree with KD. Only better sleep hygiene and practices will work for the long run. I should have mentioned only short term or occasional use with the trazadone. Not only will your tolerance go up but also your quality of sleep will go down.

dvdnvwls
06-09-17, 01:14 PM
I've heard too many times about sleep medications that successfully force you to fall asleep, but then give such poor-quality sleep that it doesn't help anyway.

Sleep is a complicated set of many functions, not just a shutdown period.


Sometimes, switching your entire life around is necessary in order for you to be OK. Things like needing to have a set bedtime that is quite early and that you have to stick to every day are not popular, but what if they work?

sarahsweets
06-10-17, 07:00 AM
Sometimes, switching your entire life around is necessary in order for you to be OK. Things like needing to have a set bedtime that is quite early and that you have to stick to every day are not popular, but what if they work?

Not popular for sure but almost a guarantee except in very rare cases. It took me 9 months to train my body to sleep. It involved going to be in the same window of time and waking up in the same window of time every single night NO matter what. It was brutal in the beginning. Falling asleep late and waking up at a set time was so hard but it paid off. I fall asleep within half and hour and wake up nearly naturally at the same time everyday. This included weekends. I am not saying people with sleep problems shouldnt take meds or that my method is fool proof, but a lot of people are not willing ton do what I do to try to make it work naturally.

Lunacie
06-10-17, 12:25 PM
Trazadone works great for me but it's tricky. It's also very strong. I took half the prescribed dose the first time and slept for almost 18 hours ruining the next day.

It has also left me feeling tired and a bit hungover the following day and even kept me up all night as well. I found through research and experience that for me taking it 1-2 hours before bed and eating a carbohydrate based snack about 30 minutes after taking dose works the best.

I took 50 mg of Trazadone for about 6 months. It seemed to re-set my sleep
schedule and I had no problem stopping it.

My autistic granddaughter takes 100 mg of Trazadone every night, and it
works great unless she is getting sick.

dvdnvwls
06-10-17, 01:54 PM
Some people's clocks apparently lack the ability to be re-set. I think it's fairly rare, but it does happen. I've read some of their discussions, where they would do what Sarah did and then uncontrollably snapped back to exactly the way they were beforehand - often with a sort of reverse pattern where they can't fall asleep until dawn, and sleep during the day. Many of them were just as committed to success as Sarah was, because it's difficult to get by using that schedule and nobody prefers it.

When all cues are taken away (can't see the sun at all, no clocks available, and so on), average people apparently get into a cycle of about 25 hours, not 24. I think some of the people with clock difficulties tend toward an even longer natural cycle.

Arei
08-11-17, 10:59 PM
Coming back to say the Trazodone was a disaster. I was literally falling over. I'm now on Lunesta which is WONDERFUL. It's not what I thought it was going to be. I can sleep normally without any grogginess/hangover effect, even if I get like 6 hours of sleep instead of 8.

I dunno if I will need it long term, some of the hype affects of my new meds are wearing off finally. I still can take naps but when it comes to going to sleep some nights I become wide awake as soon as I hit the pillow, so taking a sleep aid is needed.

Though I've also got this magnesium lotion with melatonin in it that promotes very relaxing sleep (especially before I got on these meds). I still need the lunesta now, but the lotion is still very relaxing and helps with getting good restful sleep.

Kunga Dorji
08-15-17, 11:36 PM
I agree with KD. Only better sleep hygiene and practices will work for the long run. I should have mentioned only short term or occasional use with the trazadone. Not only will your tolerance go up but also your quality of sleep will go down.


Its the same for any sleeper.
The other thing I have used occasionally is a short acting beta blocker.

I am perfectly well aware that part of the ADHD in me is an overactive stress response- relaxation/meditation works well while I am doing it-- but on a bad night it can be back on again soon after I stop the exercise. Propanolol has worked well in the past, and i need to ask my doctor about giving it another go.

the-slam-jam
08-16-17, 02:07 AM
Webber Naturals Melatonin Super Sleep and ZzzQuil tend to do it for me pretty well.
I'm also able to bore the crap out of myself trying to write short stories on my phone; a few sentences in and I'm out like a light. Sob.

concentric
10-06-17, 08:16 AM
I had horrible insomnia where I would stay awake for 3-4 days at a time until I was tired enough to fall asleep. Those days are long gone, although it took a lot of adjustments to find the right dose of medications for me. I was prescribed 400mg of seroquel but that would not allow me to fall asleep. I now take <25mg of seroquel with 1mg melatonin and I am asleep within the hour. I find that allowing it to sit under your top lip for a few minutes allows it to work at such a low dose. There is a window of about 30 minutes where you should allow your body to fall asleep otherwise if you force yourself to stay up, you will miss the window. You will know when this is as you will feel like falling asleep.