View Full Version : Healing From a Nervous Breakdown


cwf1986
09-18-16, 11:24 PM
If you don't wanna read a wall of text, just go to the last sentence.

From about January through April I was suffering through a nervous breakdown, granted the seeds for that breakdown were planted around September last year.

I went from putting in full time plus hours for school and holding about 25hours/week part time work to barely being able to hold the part time job by itself.

That might sounds like a lot, but in and of itself it's not too bad for me. I'm naturally a workhorse and am typically very restless if I don't stay busy. But issues with my family took me down.

Without going into specifics, it was the result of enmeshment and boundary issues. Since, I have addressed those issues and have made leaps and bounds in progress in that area.

But healing, that is the process to returning to my fully functional baseline is still very slow. I'm just now starting to add responsibilities into my life. But progress has been so slow....

I just hate that I've been reduced to a shell of the person I used to be, but at the same time I know I have to gauge my readiness to add things back into my life as I heal or I'm going to regress. It's frustrating.

For those that have experienced a nervous breakdown, what are some things that helped you get back to normal?

sarahsweets
09-19-16, 04:58 AM
I dont think I am familiar with what a nervous breakdown is exactly. Can you explain your symptoms?

stef
09-19-16, 07:00 AM
I can't say I had a nervous breakdown, but I went through a terrible time after I lost my mom (not right away; 2 months later). I think I got through this by just doing the strict minimum and then one day something just "brightened" (I was kind of robotically reading something and realized, I was enjoying what I was reading) and I was able to do a bit more. I truly was a shell of myself though, for about 3 months. Much of that time is just a blur.

Unmanagable
09-19-16, 07:38 AM
I termed mine as a nervous break-through instead of break-down. I was taken down by trying to pretend to be too many different things for too many people, based on what I'd been taught I was supposed to be/do/follow to be deemed acceptable to society. I call it break-through because that's what it took to finally learn how to love and care for self in the most sustainable and nurturing ways.

I was a f/t stepmom, f/t employee, going to school p/t, and actively taking my employer to task for many unethical incidents at the time everything fell out from under me. I could no longer gracefully hold all of that up on such a weak and shaky foundation of VERY poor nutrition, very little purposeful exercise, and mainly fueling myself with various meds and all the caffeine/alcohol my body would allow. Getting misdiagnosed in the process only compounded the issues and created an even larger hell that I realized was possible.

I still haven't returned to f/t work, and not sure I ever will, at least not as it's recognized and expected by society, anyway. My health and wellness are my new f/t job(s), and boy oh boy, was it ever neglected, sorely misguided and greatly miseducated through the years.

Little Missy
09-19-16, 07:43 AM
Answering the last sentence: Time.

It isn't quite as simple as that but it all involves time.

aeon
09-19-16, 10:35 AM
I dont think I am familiar with what a nervous breakdown is exactly. Can you explain your symptoms?

Mental breakdown (also known as a nervous breakdown) is a general term for an acute, time-limited mental disorder that manifests primarily as severe stress-induced depression, anxiety, or dissociation in a previously functional individual, to the extent that they are no longer able to function on a day-to-day basis until the disorder is resolved. A nervous breakdown is defined by its temporary nature, and often closely tied to psychological burnout, severe overwork, sleep deprivation, and similar stressors, which may combine to temporarily overwhelm an individual with otherwise sound mental functions.


Cheers,
Ian

peripatetic
09-23-16, 03:32 AM
i don't know that i've had a "nervous breakdown"...and i see this is in the anxiety section, so i'm thinking, apart from bouts of agoraphobia when i'm cracking from my other mental illness diagnosis...i probably haven't had quite what you're talking about.

*however*, i have "decompensated" as mental health people call it. more than once, but at least one semi precipitated one of the others happening again so soon.

my functionality plummeted. my self care was non existent. and i didn't ...well, i did a lot of things, just nothing that you'd consider especially healthy/stable/well adjusted and what i did do you'd prolly consider maladaptive/dysfunctional and definitely resulted in professional "intervention" by being escorted in because 1. i was just not able to care for myself, 2. i was getting increasingly out of touch, you could say. basically, my mental health problems become all consuming time and effort wise, my thoughts/beliefs, that is, and concurrently my self care, but also even noticing self care or thinking about...hey...maybe i've worn these clothes for a month straight and because i've lost the plot i won't go into the shower or outside in daylight...

that sorta thing.

*coincidentally, since i saw sarah on this thread...it reminds me that one of the worst times it happened...which lasted for maybe almost three full years....when i started to slowly be starting to recover...sarah talked me through brushing my long hair that hadn't been washed in a loooooong time (and i don't have dreads or anything...), much less brushed or combed.

anyway...back to the topic:

if that sounds semi familiar...to your question about how long it took to recover. frankly, i don't know that i truly have. i feel like ever since i first cracked i've been far more susceptible, vulnerable, to stress. and it seems like for many years each time i would be unstable my stress tolerance/resilience chipped further down.

that said, i do feel a lot better than i did even a year ago. it has taken time and also taken a lot of work on myself. like, self care checklists and groups and...a whole treatment plan with a multifaceted approach. i think my head is kinda like a hard-boiled egg that's been dropped a bunch. seriously. and you can do a lot to strengthen the egg shell back and rebuild it. but i can't uncrack it. so in that sense i'm unsure i'll ever be at the level of functioning i was...well...i know i won't be at the level of functioning i was when i was in my twenties and earned a doctorate, for example. but i also can't handle the amount of stress without losing it that i once handled decently well. now... i am just more fragile and have to limit my responsibilities and consider my stress levels. and when i don't, i pay for it.

it has been a long road, but i do think that our brains are able to recover more than we might fear. more than i fear, at least.

i hope that helps and best wishes to you. xx -peri


If you don't wanna read a wall of text, just go to the last sentence.

From about January through April I was suffering through a nervous breakdown, granted the seeds for that breakdown were planted around September last year.

I went from putting in full time plus hours for school and holding about 25hours/week part time work to barely being able to hold the part time job by itself.

That might sounds like a lot, but in and of itself it's not too bad for me. I'm naturally a workhorse and am typically very restless if I don't stay busy. But issues with my family took me down.

Without going into specifics, it was the result of enmeshment and boundary issues. Since, I have addressed those issues and have made leaps and bounds in progress in that area.

But healing, that is the process to returning to my fully functional baseline is still very slow. I'm just now starting to add responsibilities into my life. But progress has been so slow....

I just hate that I've been reduced to a shell of the person I used to be, but at the same time I know I have to gauge my readiness to add things back into my life as I heal or I'm going to regress. It's frustrating.

For those that have experienced a nervous breakdown, what are some things that helped you get back to normal?

DJ Bill
09-23-16, 07:44 PM
Add some positive people to your support team. (They don't have to know they are your support team, either. ) Don't try to do this alone.

Don't beat yourself up about how little you think you can do... right now just taking care of yourself every day is plenty. Slowly build your life back as the opportunity arises, and don't go overboard with too much too fast.

Good food, exercise, peaceful mellow music, animal and human companionship, meditation, and prayer all helped me when I went through my valley of despair. It took time, about 3 months, before I was able to take care of myself well enough to live alone again. The total return to "normalcy" was quite a bit longer, and I have relapsed into depression a few times since. Never anywhere as deep as I was in 1993 because now I have tools to fight it with. At the time I seriously considered voluntary institutionalization.

And Internet friends are a good start on being part of the world around you again. So welcome to the funhouse!

I feel for you... it can really hurt inside. Don't let the pain make you do something you'd regret later. :grouphug::) And....keep talking!

Delboy31
10-18-16, 09:53 PM
All I can say is take one step at a time. Don't feel bad that there are things you cannot do at the present. When you are ready you can start adding things to your life...and you know that you are ready. Remember to pat yourself on the back for the smallest of achievements even if you don't see them as big steps.

Eventually you will heal, and hopefully recognize that when things become too overwhelming in the future to take a breath, give yourself a break, and take what you have learned and become stronger.

Mr.focus
10-28-16, 12:04 AM
I been into hard time and the solution i find is in Self-help tape. For me, the best was tony robbin and Les Brown tape. Any time i feel bad, i go look it up.

dvdnvwls
10-28-16, 12:53 AM
There's no going back to the way things were. Don't try. Don't look for it to happen on its own. Instead, allow yourself to live in the new reality.

Jeftheginger
10-28-16, 01:05 AM
Meditate in your own feelings. Know yourself. Who are you? Why do you act like you do? If you know who you are and why you act you can be at peace with your sorrow.

Mr.focus
11-02-16, 10:57 PM
I'm not a specialist so if you don't resonate or just doubt myself, just pass to the next comment, i'll be alright :)

I great way to help myself from a nervous breakdown that the doctor or specialist never taugh me, that i found help me (i'm diagnost with anxiety disorder) is to right everything that goes wrong in my life. I actually did that today. That's puts the problem on the paper and not anymore in my head.

After writting everyone of my problem, even if it's not my problem, i'll write it, I put under every negative statement a solution. If there is no solution, i just take full responsabilities.

Lloyd_
01-26-17, 09:54 PM
For those that have experienced a nervous breakdown, what are some things that helped you get back to normal?

When you finally hit rock bottom and realize it only goes up from there. I'm not 100% back to normal, I don't think it's possible. It just got to where I felt a sense of accomplishment when after I first got back on my feet but lately I've been feeling kind of numb and a bit stuck, idk if I'm heading for a relapse but I certainly feel as if I'm stumbling around in the dark here.

Lloyd_
01-26-17, 09:56 PM
I been into hard time and the solution i find is in Self-help tape. For me, the best was tony robbin and Les Brown tape. Any time i feel bad, i go look it up.

For me none of that magical thinking ever worked, when I came to the realization that there's nothing wrong with healthy cynicism I became let down in life far less often. ;)