View Full Version : mild, moderate and severe deficits of self-regulation (aka, ADHD)


mildadhd
10-02-16, 08:30 PM
Nobody is born with the ability to self-regulate.

Are mild developmental deficits of self-regulation (aka, mild ADHD) normal for the general public?

(except for people who have moderate and severe developmental deficits of self-regulation (aka, moderate and severe ADHD)

In other words, are there people who fully develop the ability to self-regulate?

Have a nice week.


G

Lunacie
10-02-16, 09:10 PM
Most people learn how to self-regulate most of the time. Moments of dis-regulation now and then is not the same as mild ADHD.

ADHD is only diagnosed when self-regulation is impaired across their regular daily lives.

Someone diagnosed with ADHD may go for months with mild symptoms because they have little stress and good support, and suddenly they encounter a lot of stress and/or their support system is gone and wow! suddenly they have severe symptoms.

That doesn't mean they suddenly developed ADHD.

Someone with severe symptoms really struggles on a daily basis, then finds the right meds or a good life coach and a job that is suited to their aptitudes, and ha! the symptoms become more mild.

That doesn't mean their ADHD has been cured.

namazu
10-02-16, 10:03 PM
In other words, are there people who fully develop the ability to self-regulate?
I doubt it, though some people do it very well. (Depends a lot on how you define "self-regulation", though.)

Most people could not be considered to have "deficits" if a "deficit" were defined as "much poorer than average ability".

Most people could be considered to have "deficits" if "deficit" meant "imperfect ability".

It's all on a continuum, though -- there's no hard-and-fast cutoff between "normal" and "abnormal" self-regulation ability, just as the line between "ADHD" and "not ADHD" is fuzzy.

Any such lines people might draw are arbitrary.

C15H25N3O
10-03-16, 09:35 AM
Everything is normal for the general public

unless they do not have to think about.

mildadhd
10-04-16, 02:58 PM
Someone diagnosed with ADHD may go for months with mild symptoms because they have little stress and good support, and suddenly they encounter a lot of stress and/or their support system is gone and wow! suddenly they have severe symptoms..

..Someone with severe symptoms really struggles on a daily basis, then finds the right meds or a good life coach and a job that is suited to their aptitudes, and ha! the symptoms become more mild.

I have never heard of anyone being diagnosed with mild ADHD (aka, mild deficits of self-regulation) before?

Do people diagnosed with mild ADHD take medication?

Do you think someone could really go from severe symptoms to mild symptoms, with the right emotional environment?

Emotional environment is a decisive factor.


G

Lunacie
10-04-16, 06:12 PM
I have never heard of anyone being diagnosed with mild ADHD (aka, mild deficits of self-regulation) before?

Do people diagnosed with mild ADHD take medication?

Do you think someone could really go from severe symptoms to mild symptoms, with the right emotional environment?

Emotional environment is a decisive factor.


G

Yes, ADHD may be diagnosed as mild to severe.
For instance: http://patient.info/health/attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder-leaflet

Some with autism or Asperger's may have secondary ADHD which may be on the mild side.

Those with mild symptoms may find that training or coaching or therapy like CBT is all the help they need.

The parents or guardians of course go for the training when it's a young child.

Although emotions play a big part, I think there's more to this than just emotions.

The right environment (support, enjoyable job, less stress overall) may be less emotionally stressful for the person.

mildadhd
10-04-16, 07:10 PM
Although emotions play a big part, I think there's more to this than just emotions.

The right environment (support, enjoyable job, less stress overall) may be less emotionally stressful for the person.


There are emotional stresses found in the environment that feel good, like "support, enjoyable job", etc

And there are emotional stresses found in the environment that feel bad, like no support, unenjoyable, etc.

The environmental stresses, like, no support, unenjoyable job, feel bad emotionally because they stimulate our negative feeling primary emotion systems in our brains.

The environmental stresses, like, "support, enjoyable job", feel good emotionally because they stimulate our positive feeling primary emotional systems in our brains.



G

Lunacie
10-04-16, 07:18 PM
There are emotional stresses that feel good, like "support, enjoyable job", etc

And there are emotional stresses that feel bad, like no support, unenjoyable, etc.

Can you feel that the right environments, like, "support, enjoyable job", feel good emotionally.



G

Another way of what I said here . . .
"The right environment (support, enjoyable job, less stress overall) may be less emotionally stressful for the person."

. . . would be to say "The right environment (support, enjoyable job, less stress overall) may be more emotionally enjoyable for the person.

Does that answer whatever you were asking me?

mildadhd
10-04-16, 07:51 PM
Although emotions play a big part, I think there's more to this than just emotions.

The right environment (support, enjoyable job, less stress overall) may be less emotionally stressful for the person.

You said, "Although emotions play a big part, I think there's more than just emotions", then gave two environmental examples that both feel good emotionally, example "support, enjoyable job".

Emotional temperament and emotional circumstances are decisive factors on how we emotionally feel and emotionally behave, throughout life.

G

Lunacie
10-04-16, 08:04 PM
You said, "Although emotions play a big part, I think there's more than just emotions", then gave two environmental examples that both feel good emotionally, example "support, enjoyable job".

Emotional temperament and emotional circumstances are decisive factors on how we emotionally feel and emotionally behave, throughout life.

G

I was talking about more stress and less stress.

Stress can be emotional, it can also be "more than just emotional.

Stress can manifest emotionally, it can also manifest physically (headache, backache, etc.).

Stress can also manifest as confusion or brain fog, and changes in behavior.

Does that help you understand what I'm getting at?

mildadhd
10-04-16, 08:18 PM
I was talking about more stress and less stress.

Stress can be emotional, it can also be "more than just emotional.

Stress can manifest emotionally, it can also manifest physically (headache, backache, etc.).

Stress can also manifest as confusion or brain fog, and changes in behavior.

Does that help you understand what I'm getting at?

Confusion and brain fog are both example of dissociation, which involves the primitive FEAR/freeze or flight, emotional response system in our brains.

G

Lunacie
10-04-16, 08:20 PM
Confusion and brain fog are both example of dissociation, which involves PRIMARY/secondary: RAGE/fight, FEAR/freeze or flight emotional responses systems, in our brains.

G

I don't follow where you're going now. :scratch:

mildadhd
10-04-16, 08:49 PM
Enjoyable job lessens severity of ADHD.

Unenjoyable job worsens the severity of ADHD.

In both cases the person has a job and ADHD.

It is the emotional environment that is the decisive factor.


G

Lunacie
10-04-16, 09:32 PM
Enjoyable job lessens severity of ADHD.

Unenjoyable job worsens the severity of ADHD.

In both cases the person has a job and ADHD.

It is the emotional environment that is the decisive factor.


G

I'm not arguing with the first part of that.

You can say that the emotional environment is "the decisive factor" for you in whether your symptoms and impairments are more or less severe, but it may not be true for everyone.

I have chronic pain from more than one source, and believe me, it causes brain fog and lessens my enjoyement of everything. It certainly changes my behavior when I'm in pain versus when I'm not in pain.

If you want to focus only on emotions for this discussion that's up to you. But it would be less confusing for me and others if you made that clear.

mildadhd
10-04-16, 10:23 PM
I'm not arguing with the first part of that.

You can say that the emotional environment is "the decisive factor" for you in whether your symptoms and impairments are more or less severe, but it may not be true for everyone.

I have chronic pain from more than one source, and believe me, it causes brain fog and lessens my enjoyement of everything. It certainly changes my behavior when I'm in pain versus when I'm not in pain.

If you want to focus only on emotions for this discussion that's up to you. But it would be less confusing for me and others if you made that clear.

Genetically there are 3 types of basic feelings: emotional, homeostatic and sensory.

Emotional, homeostatic and sensory pain that feels bad, lessens emotional, homeostatic and sensory pleasure that feels good.

Emotional, homeostatic and sensory pleasure that feels good, lessens emotional, homeostatic and sensory pain that feels bad.


G

mildadhd
10-04-16, 10:43 PM
I'm not arguing with the first part of that.

You can say that the emotional environment is "the decisive factor" for you in whether your symptoms and impairments are more or less severe, but it may not be true for everyone.

I have chronic pain from more than one source, and believe me, it causes brain fog and lessens my enjoyement of everything. It certainly changes my behavior when I'm in pain versus when I'm not in pain.

If you want to focus only on emotions for this discussion that's up to you. But it would be less confusing for me and others if you made that clear.

"Enjoyable job" was your example.

Joy is an emotional feeling.

Right?


G

mildadhd
10-04-16, 11:09 PM
I still do not understand how to differ between the mild ADHD population (aka, mild deficits of self-regulation population) and the general population, unless the person also has at least moderate symptoms?

G

namazu
10-04-16, 11:32 PM
I still do not understand how to differ between the mild ADHD population (aka, mild deficits of self-regulation population) and the general population, unless the person also has at least moderate symptoms?

Here's what the current DSM says, as related by CHADD (http://www.chadd.org/Portals/0/Content/CHADD/NRC/Factsheets/aboutADHD.pdf):
Mild: Few symptoms beyond the required number for diagnosis are present, and symptoms result in minor impairment in social, school or work settings.

Moderate: Symptoms or functional impairment between “mild” and “severe” are present.

Severe: Many symptoms are present beyond the number needed to make a diagnosis; several symptoms are particularly severe; or symptoms result in marked impairment in social, school or work settings.

These severity criteria don't apply to the whole population, just to the chunk of the population who meet criteria for ADHD diagnosis.

So, "Mild ADHD" doesn't refer to people who have little problem self-regulating overall or who have minimal ADHD symptoms.

It refers to people who already meet the criteria for ADHD -- but just meet the criteria, and don't exceed them, and who only have minor impairments as a result.

I don't think the people at the low end of "mild ADHD" are all that different from the people who just barely miss the cutoff for diagnosis with ADHD, though.

The "symptoms" vs. "impairment" issue is tricky, too -- a lot of things may contribute to overall impairment besides just ADHD symptoms.

Lunacie
10-04-16, 11:46 PM
I still do not understand how to differ between the mild ADHD population (aka, mild deficits of self-regulation population) and the general population, unless the person also has at least moderate symptoms?

G

To be diagnosed with adhd there must be ...

"... clear evidence that the symptoms interfere with, or reduce the quality of, social, academic, or occupational functioning." [DSM-V]

Mild adhd is not the same thing as no adhd.

Someone with mild adhd may only have the minimum number of symptoms for diagnosis and no more than minor impairment in functioning.

If there is no impairment, the person does not meet the criteria for diagnosis with adhd.

If the symptoms do cause impairment, the person meets the criteria for diagnosis with adhd.

Moderate adhd is at least enough symptoms for diagnosis and a moderate impairment of functioning. Moderate is somewhere between mild and severe.


Any medical condition may be described as mild, moderate or severe.

A mild hearing loss might be unable to hear certain tones and low volume.

Severe hearing loss might be unable to hear anything unless it's very clear and very loud.

Moderate hearing loss could be anywhere between those two ends of the spectrum.

mildadhd
10-05-16, 12:29 AM
Conners regulation spectrum?

Regulation Far below average (-3)
Regulation Below average (-2)
Regulation Slightly below average (-1)
Regulation Average (+1)
Regulation Above average (+2)
Regulation Far above average (+3)

Would mild deficits of self-regulation be "slightly below average (-1)" on the Conners regulation spectrum?

G

mildadhd
10-05-16, 02:08 AM
Conners regulation spectrum?

Regulation Far below average (-3)
Regulation Below average (-2)
Regulation Slightly below average (-1)
Regulation Average (+1)
Regulation Above average (+2)
Regulation Far above average (+3)

Would mild deficits of self-regulation be "slightly below average (-1)" on the Conners regulation spectrum?

G


Development of regulation far below average and development of regulation far above average are at opposite ends of the spectrum?

G