View Full Version : Name two types of treatment for deficits of self-regulation


mildadhd
10-05-16, 10:17 PM
Name two types of treatment for ADHD, (aka, deficits of self-regulation)

Example,

1)Healthy emotionally attuned relationship with at least one maternal regulator, 2)and methylphenidate


G

peripatetic
10-05-16, 11:19 PM
Name two types of treatment for ADHD, (aka, deficits of self-regulation)

Example,

1)Healthy emotionally attuned relationship with at least one maternal regulator, 2)and methylphenidate


G

i have an off topic question, though i will answer your question, too. (NB: i did...just scroll down until you see bolded lettering.)

i've noticed of late that you (parenthetically, at least ;)) consistently posit adhd as equivalent to "deficits of self regulation". i don't think that entirely corresponds to my experience. except insofar as everything that's disorder in my life has to do, with a few steps in reasoning, with a "deficit of self regulation"...emphasis on the "self" because if i could regulate myself i wouldn't ever feel or think or see or hear or experience anything i didn't choose to. because it all boils down to my ability to "self regulate".

so, example: for me, i have a very hard time being selective with my attention. and shoes on a floor can be as attractive of it as the person talking to me directly, even though i was initially invested in the conversation and actively listening. i loathe these sorts of phrases, but i do relate to the blah blah blah we're involved in something and then out of nowhere i smell a smell and then i'm connecting that to seventeen other things and talking about that and i've interrupted you and then i come back to the conversation, sorta, but i have no idea where we were except "you were saying something"? and that's frustrating as all hell if you're the interlocutor with me, i get that.

here's my question to you: that only counts as adhd if "deficit of self regulation" is my inability to prioritize my attention and filter out the noise of everything else, thought wise and external world wise and everything in between and otherwise. if i can "regulate" myself enough to filter it all out and select and stick with one type of or stream of input and not just ignore but somehow block out everything else, or enough to keep up with the stream i've selected....then i wouldn't have adhd. my deficit is an inability to filter input. both mental and physical. and emotional, though i would say that's a combination of mental and physical for me...

anyway...isn't that, isn't that the same rationale...that it's a self regulation deficit because i can't suspend input and desires and thoughts and choose in a vacuum...that is responsible for all of my difficulties? and perhaps those of others? so the only thing that justifies that i can see calling my filtering problem, which i've been repeatedly assured is due to my adhd, and is dramatically improved by 1. medication and 2. exercise and getting adequate sleep...is that i can't block out everything and choose without the noise or the ideas popping up and the immediate switching to that and then another and another and another... if you could block out the external world and filter everything....and have everything you do be the result of your selection, then what distinguishes adhd from having any other mental illness i can think of...or not even a mental illness. i think a lot of what troubles people could boil down to a result of a comparable "deficit of self regulation" and so i'm super curious why you see that as synonymous with the diagnosis...the disorder...the condition, adhd.?

i'm sure you've written about it elsewhere and i apologize as i am currently unmedicated for my adhd and i couldn't even begin to read my own writing and edit my post if i make no sense above...my reading comprehension takes a big hit ... so if you could just post a link where i could read what you read that makes the equivocation or a thread where it's detailed in as bullet pointed as possible...or with graphs or diagrams...any sort of spatial or visual representation would actually be ideal... or numeric. anyway, i'd appreciate it.

now, to answer your question, i said above but want to be sure i'm responding to your topic:

*****actual answer to thread start*****

1. medication: actually treats the switches i seem born without the manuals for and enables me to use all of the great support systems and resources and materials i've learned about over the years of taking skills classes and so forth...which...i only seem to be able to apply when medicated enough to think to do it....

and

2. exercise and adequate sleep: which don't "treat" my adhd, per se, but exercise is my default for clearing my head...trail running, specifically...and if *fail* to get adequate sleep, i'm far more discombobulated. so definitely getting adequate sleep is a good first step just in general for me. i often fail at this one or go way over though.
[/B]

kilted_scotsman
10-06-16, 06:51 AM
I think meds are currently a given for most people therefore I'm going to give two non-med options.....

1) This looks like four things but is actually one..... it comes from Cozolino's book "The Neuroscience of Psychotherapy". When I read it I realised that Cozolino's four components of change fit the process I've been following since my diagnosis.

a) A contactful, empathetic relationship with another person that allows one to experience challenge positively and reflect upon it.
(This would beRogers "unconditional positive regard" or in TA terms and I'm OK, You're OK relationship) - for me this has been my relationship with my partner.

b) Mild challenge - For me this has been relational-dance, attending interpersonal workshops, groupwork etc

c) A cognitive framework in which to put the emotional and sensory experience of the challenge
for me this has been my diagnosis and then the psychotherapy training I have undertaken

d) an environment that supports the creation of a new narrative about oneself
ADDF??!!

2) Getting out into nature on a regular basis.

Unmanagable
10-06-16, 09:14 AM
I like and agree with the answers above, and can only think to add (1) mindful nutrition, by healthily choosing what we fuel our (and our children's) bodies with, and (2) daily purposeful and mindful movement with purposeful breath work, in order to keep the lymphatic fluids healthily flowing and to increase our oxygen flow.

Many remain convinced it's all in the genes, and that's that. But it's also very much in the grocery cart. Genes that create and form ailments have to somehow be activated and have an environment they can grow and thrive in, right?

If we fuel our bodies with the same things our family did/does, then is it really and truly just simply a genetic disorder, or is it also a disorder of feeding the genes all the things that created the perfect inner terrain for the dis-eases to grow in the first place? (the phrase "keep doing what you (or in this case your family) have been doing, keep getting what you (or dis-eased and/or deceased family members) have been getting" comes to mind)

Even though many think they're doing "fine" in constantly eating fast foods/frozen foods/energy drinks/sodas/and other highly processed food-like stuff(s), as well as the energetic exchange from animal products and such, the slow-building long term effects are the things I've painfully and repeatedly learned that sneak up on us and heartily kick us square in the a** leaving us, and many mis-educated and under-educated (where basic nutrition/digestive system/lymphatic system, meridian system, etc. are concerned, at least) professionals, wondering what the hell is going on since we don't fit the tidy little boxes of symptoms that the insurance companies have to check off in order to approve treatment.

And that's where the guinea pig adventures of attempted medicated treatments began, and where my life almost ended. If I hadn't switched my basic life fuel of choice, and my entire lifestyle, I'm afraid my other treatment options might not have been the least bit effective. The most recommended and most preferred ones, according to most of the publicly supported studies and such, definitely weren't the ones my body worked well with.

Lunacie
10-06-16, 10:13 AM
1. Of course med, or for some of us, fish oil (Omega 3) supplements.

2. Behavior therapy and social skills therapy for kids, Cognitive Behavior Therapy for adults.

Best results seem to come from both of these together.

Little Missy
10-06-16, 10:21 AM
A real good stereo system and Adderall and Dexedrine.

sarahsweets
10-06-16, 11:34 AM
Meds+ therapy.

mildadhd
10-07-16, 12:51 AM
i have an off topic question, though i will answer your question, too. (NB: i did...just scroll down until you see bolded lettering.)

i've noticed of late that you (parenthetically, at least ;)) consistently posit adhd as equivalent to "deficits of self regulation". i don't think that entirely corresponds to my experience. except insofar as everything that's disorder in my life has to do, with a few steps in reasoning, with a "deficit of self regulation"...emphasis on the "self" because if i could regulate myself i wouldn't ever feel or think or see or hear or experience anything i didn't choose to. because it all boils down to my ability to "self regulate".

so, example: for me, i have a very hard time being selective with my attention. and shoes on a floor can be as attractive of it as the person talking to me directly, even though i was initially invested in the conversation and actively listening. i loathe these sorts of phrases, but i do relate to the blah blah blah we're involved in something and then out of nowhere i smell a smell and then i'm connecting that to seventeen other things and talking about that and i've interrupted you and then i come back to the conversation, sorta, but i have no idea where we were except "you were saying something"? and that's frustrating as all hell if you're the interlocutor with me, i get that.

here's my question to you: that only counts as adhd if "deficit of self regulation" is my inability to prioritize my attention and filter out the noise of everything else, thought wise and external world wise and everything in between and otherwise. if i can "regulate" myself enough to filter it all out and select and stick with one type of or stream of input and not just ignore but somehow block out everything else, or enough to keep up with the stream i've selected....then i wouldn't have adhd. my deficit is an inability to filter input. both mental and physical. and emotional, though i would say that's a combination of mental and physical for me...

anyway...isn't that, isn't that the same rationale...that it's a self regulation deficit because i can't suspend input and desires and thoughts and choose in a vacuum...that is responsible for all of my difficulties? and perhaps those of others? so the only thing that justifies that i can see calling my filtering problem, which i've been repeatedly assured is due to my adhd, and is dramatically improved by 1. medication and 2. exercise and getting adequate sleep...is that i can't block out everything and choose without the noise or the ideas popping up and the immediate switching to that and then another and another and another... if you could block out the external world and filter everything....and have everything you do be the result of your selection, then what distinguishes adhd from having any other mental illness i can think of...or not even a mental illness. i think a lot of what troubles people could boil down to a result of a comparable "deficit of self regulation" and so i'm super curious why you see that as synonymous with the diagnosis...the disorder...the condition, adhd.?

i'm sure you've written about it elsewhere and i apologize as i am currently unmedicated for my adhd and i couldn't even begin to read my own writing and edit my post if i make no sense above...my reading comprehension takes a big hit ... so if you could just post a link where i could read what you read that makes the equivocation or a thread where it's detailed in as bullet pointed as possible...or with graphs or diagrams...any sort of spatial or visual representation would actually be ideal... or numeric. anyway, i'd appreciate it...





A few days before you asked, I was also wondering if there are any macro differences between deficits of self-regulation, associated with different types of emotional/mental health diagnosis?

I do not think there is.

I think similar types of consistent distresses may partly occur as a result of similar types of hypersensitive temperaments.

But no matter the type of consistent distresses and associated hypersensitive temperaments, in general deficits of self-regulation due to consistent distresses, occur the same way developmentally.

Will post more tomorrow.

G

mctavish23
10-07-16, 11:44 AM
What they ^ said = (Stimulant) Medications + Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (including Mindfulness) :)

Hope that helps :yes:

tc

mctavish23

(Robert) :cool:

mildadhd
10-07-16, 08:22 PM
1)Emotional coaching and 2)awareness


What they ^ said = (Stimulant) Medications + Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (including Mindfulness) :)

Hope that helps :yes:

tc

mctavish23

(Robert) :cool:


Mctavish23

Could you help me explain to the readers how primary caregivers provide emotional support/coaching that promotes the healthy development of self-regulation?

Example

When parents and carers respond in a caring way, for example, with a calm tone of voice, holding, rocking and gentle touch, children learn they can feel comfortable and safe again. They learn others will be available to help them notice and understand their feelings and behaviours and provide comfort when needed. Parents and carers act like an ‘emotion coach’ and with their help, children can learn to regulate their feelings and behaviours. Being able to manage feelings and behaviours is called self-regulation.

Emotional and behavioural self-regulation contributes to young children’s growing independence. It is this growing ability to control their own feelings and behaviour that eventually allows a child to become more skilled in their relationships with children and adults, for example, when playing together or making decisions together. In the preschool years, children’s self-regulation skills are still developing and can often go up and down. Being able to consistently regulate their own feelings and behaviour is a major task for a young child.

See more at "Explaining self-regulation"

http://www.kidsmatter.edu.au/mental-health-matters/social-and-emotional-learning/anger/explaining-self-regulation

G

mildadhd
10-07-16, 08:54 PM
1)relationship with an aware maternal regulator to help infants'/toddlers'/childrens'/teens'/young adults'/adults' feel safe and self-regulation mature, and 2) considerness


G

mildadhd
10-07-16, 09:29 PM
1)Feeling safe, and 2) PLAYful movement (primary emotional-affective feelings evolved with movement) example forward movement associated with RAGE, meant to promote survival, complex example "roadRAGE".



G

mildadhd
10-08-16, 01:03 AM
Since the late 1970s, clinical researchers such as Virginia Douglas, Ph.D. (then working at McGill University), who were studying ADHD have asserted that the disorder likely involves a serious deficiency in the capacity for self-regulation. Why? Because they had already begun documenting through various measures that ADHD was associated with deficits in inhibition, managing one’s attention, self-directed speech and rule-following, self-motivation, and eventually even self-awareness. If ADHD involves difficulties in these faculties and these are the human mental abilities that are involved in our regulating our own behavior, then logically ADHD ought to be a disorder of self-regulation. Since then, research has continued to affirm the involvement of deficits in these and other mental abilities that are essential for effective self-regulation in people with ADHD resulting in a tacit acceptance of the idea that ADHD is actually SRDD (self-regulation deficit disorder). While the official name for the disorder will not be changed anytime soon in the official manual that grants names to mental disorders, it is important that people understand this equivalence of ADHD with self-regulation deficits.

http://www.russellbarkley.org/factsheets/ADHD_EF_and_SR.pdf


Hi Peripatetic,

Here is a helpful article by Dr. Barkley discussing the importance of understanding the "equivalence of ADHD with self-regulation deficits"

I will look for more.


G

20thcenturyfox
10-08-16, 02:08 PM
Name two types of treatment for ADHD, (aka, deficits of self-regulation)
Example,
1)Healthy emotionally attuned relationship with at least one maternal regulator, 2)and methylphenidate...

First, I think it may be too much to say (as implied by "aka") that ADHD is confined to deficits of self-regulation, although the latter are clearly a prominent feature and a cause of much suffering and impairment. In my (inattentive) case it may be a fair description, but I'm not sure how well it covers the entire spectrum of the classic syndrome. Maybe as more is learned about the disorder, and how we can distinguish co-morbidities, this description will prove to account for all observations. Or maybe not.

OTOH, we should also keep in mind that very similar disorders of self-regulation are known to arise in many contexts other than ADHD, including acquired brain injury, frontal stroke, white matter disease, addictions, and even normal immaturity and normal aging. Problems with attentional scanning and screening, interpretation of emotional inputs, response inhibition, activation, initiation, persistence, planning & goal-directed organization, awareness of time, and decision-making are all issues afflicting people whose cognitive disorders do not derive from ADHD.

So it seems to me that anyone interested in learning about the most successful targeted treatment protocols for specific aspects of self-regulation should look beyond ADHD to the literature of these other fields to see what cognitive treatments and rehabilitation protocols are being developed there.

So, with all that being said, here are the 2 treatment models for executive dysfunction I will be pursuing in the near future (this being in addition to medication, home care, increased physical and social activities, i.e.>zero, light control and eating more seafood):

1. Goal Management Training http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.3109/09638288.2013.777807

2. Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy http://s3.amazonaws.com/academia.edu.documents/40499386/Combined_Goal_Management_Training_and_Mi20151130-12358-tojm09.pdf?AWSAccessKeyId=AKIAJ56TQJRTWSMTNPEA&Expires=1475949396&Signature=YqSnlndf%2Fsyj93zShcP4CFS6z%2Fc%3D&response-content-disposition=inline%3B%20filename%3DCombined_goal_m anagement_training_and_mi.pdf

mildadhd
10-08-16, 02:41 PM
First, I think it may be too much to say (as implied by "aka") that ADHD is confined to deficits of self-regulation, although the latter are clearly a prominent feature and a cause of much suffering and impairment. In my (inattentive) case it may be a fair description, but I'm not sure how well it covers the entire spectrum of the classic syndrome. Maybe as more is learned about the disorder, and how we can distinguish co-morbidities, this description will prove to account for all observations. Or maybe not.




It is also to much to say that self-regulation (aka, executive function) is confined to cognitive function.

Considering that pre executive functions like attention and motivation, originate in parts of the systems functioning in the deeply subcortical regions of our emotional brains.

Part of the reason I prefer the term self-regulation to ADHD is because we do not know how ADHD develops, but we do know a lot more about how self-regulation develops, involving affective/cognitive functioning.

Which is extremely helpful in treating deficits of self-regulation. (Sometimes known as ADHD)


G

mctavish23
10-08-16, 02:58 PM
My respectful suggestion would be to read & learn as much as possible about the

disorder from reputable sources, in particular, Russ Barkley, PhD.

Good luck.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

mildadhd
10-08-16, 04:18 PM
Thanks

I appreciate Yours' and Dr Barkleys' work.

I also believe in diversity.

I also appreciate the work of brain researchers like Dr. Panksepp, Dr Mate, Dr. Piaget, Dr. Schore, Dr. Grandin, Dr Damasio, etc, that help me understand how in early life preexecutive emotional function develop, then our executive function connected on top.

(Which for healthy development must include a mandatory relationship with at least one maternal regulator)

Respectfully, my personal constructive criticism is that You should also focus on the most important period of development of self-regulation, during the preoperational stage of early brain development before birth and the age of 4, when our pre executive function matures (aka, pre self-regulation function), because that is what our development of self-regulation is biologically based upon.

I am sure Yours' and Dr.Barkleys' work is meant to help people who have AD(H)D. (Aka, deficits of self segulation)

I am also interested in preventing and lessening severity of AD(H)D.

What I am suggesting is to include understanding the emotionally based preoperational stage of development in regards to the prevention and lessening of severity of ADHD (aka, prevention and lessening of deficits of self-regulation) by including the physiology of implicit preverbal development occurring during the preoperational stage of development, in your helpful work to date.

G

20thcenturyfox
10-08-16, 04:33 PM
...So it seems to me that anyone interested in learning about the most successful targeted treatment protocols for specific aspects of self-regulation should look beyond ADHD to the literature of these other fields to see what cognitive treatments and rehabilitation protocols are being developed there.

It is also to much to say that self-regulation (aka, executive function) is confined to cognitive function.

Considering that pre executive functions like attention and motivation, originate in parts of the systems functioning in the deeply subcortical regions of our emotional brains.

If it appeared I was asserting anything about the relative scope of self-regulation and cognition, it was entirely accidental, as I am completely ignorant of where cognition leaves off and pre-cognition begins. Does "cognitive" refer only to processes taking place in certain parts of the brain, then?

The points I did intend to make--that regardless of whether "self-regulation" completely encompasses ADHD, there are many other conditions which appear to share these exact same "self-regulation" challenges, and therefore researchers and clinicians in other fields are developing rehab treatments for executive dysfunction which may be equally applicable to ADHD--were, I hope, fairly clear. After all, it is already too late for anyone reading this to go back and optimize our pre-operational development, let alone find a more "emotionally attuned maternal regulator!"

But if this distinction Mildadhd raises--between pre-cognitive vs cognitive processes--has any implications for treatment options I would be interested to learn more about it. So far as I have read, both Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) and Goal Management Training (GMT) seem to address attention and motivation issues as if they were part of the larger group of cognitive processes. And IIRC even Gabor Mate, in saying that adult ADHD patients just have to become our own "good parent" doesn't make any distinction between pre-cognitive and later cognitive processes.

When it comes to finding effective treatments later in life, could this be one of those "distinctions without a difference?"

mctavish23
10-08-16, 05:52 PM
mild,

That was most impressive. I'm also flattered to be included in the same

sentence with Russ, since practically everything I've learned, other than from

my own personal life experiences, has come primarily from him.

Having said that, there are a great many ADHD authors out there whose work

is truly exceptional. Some of my (personal) favorites include Kevin Murphy,

and of course the "classic" contributions of Hallowell, and Kelly & Ramundo.

Having been retired now for almost 3 years, I don't read the literature like I

used to, but I appreciate and respect your feedback.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

mildadhd
10-09-16, 02:08 AM
If it appeared I was asserting anything about the relative scope of self-regulation and cognition, it was entirely accidental, as I am completely ignorant of where cognition leaves off and pre-cognition begins...



Precognitive function matures before cognitive function. (Or precognitive function would have been called postcognitive function).

Precognitive function regulate behavior.

As cognitive function matures on top of precognitive function, cognitive function learns to self regulate precognitive function.


G

mildadhd
10-09-16, 11:55 AM
1)Promoting healthy emotional circumstances that promote development of self-regulation 2)support during required medication holidays

Originally Posted by Lunacie (In another thread)

Someone diagnosed with ADHD may go for months with mild symptoms because they have little stress and good support, and suddenly they encounter a lot of stress and/or their support system is gone and wow! suddenly they have severe symptoms..

..Someone with severe symptoms really struggles on a daily basis, then finds the right meds or a good life coach and a job that is suited to their aptitudes, and ha! the symptoms become more mild.

http://www.addforums.com/forums/showpost.php?p=1842125&postcount=2


The context of quote below focuses on children with ADD in the classroom, although the same situational concept applies for treatment of all ages.

A few months ago I required a medication holiday, because my body was becoming to accustomed to the medications, and the medication was not working so well.

I have one boss that does not yell, is more fun/playful and more compassionate in general, I have another boss that yells more and less compassionate.

Neither of them know I take medication for AD(H)D, or that I was taking a medication holiday.

I loose my ability to focus to read a measuring tape, without methyphenidate, and in the past employment before diagnosis I always did more physical labor, usually outside, that requires less cognitive ability/focus.

After a seven week medication holiday, the boss that yells more and is less fun, and less supportive claimed I only did work well, when I felt like it.

Which was not true, his more aggressive style makes me freeze, and it is harder for me to concentrate.

I can only do work well, that I can focus upon.

I had much less problem focusing doing the same work for the more compassionate, supportive and less aggressive boss that does not yell at me.

(Side note, I am sure I could have avoided the conflict if I could have just told them I have AD(H)D, and need to take a medication holiday, that might affect my focus and may need a little extra time and support during the medication holiday, but I screened them when I started the job, and neither believe in ADHD, so I cannot tell them)

And now that I am taking methylphenidate again, the boss that is less supportive thinks I was messing with him, because I can now focus again to do the carpentry that I was struggling to get done before, and especially during my secrete medication holiday.

ADD is situational: in the same individual its expression may vary greatly from one circumstance to another.

There are certain classes, for example, in which the ADD child may perform remarkably well, while in others she is scattered, unproductive and perhaps disruptive.

Teachers may conclude that the child is willfully deciding when or when not to buckle down and work diligently.

Many children with ADD are subjected to overt disapproval and public shaming in the classroom for behaviours they do not consciously choose.

These children are not purposefully inattentive or disobedient.

There are emotional and neurophysiological forces at play that do the actual deciding for them.

We shall examine them in due course.

Gabor Mate M.D., "Scattered", p 14-15.

G

mildadhd
10-10-16, 01:33 AM
1)Awareness of emotionally hypersensitive temperament, and 2) awareness of genetic homologous unconditioned raw emotional behaviors.


G

Lunacie
10-10-16, 12:07 PM
1)Awareness of emotionally hypersensitive temperament, and 2) awareness of genetic homologous unconditioned raw emotional behaviors.


G

Your previous post on your work history was very informative. Thank you.

But I never know how to respond to these ... idunno ... descriptions? They are not sentences. I don't know the context you intend here?

mildadhd
10-10-16, 06:38 PM
Your previous post on your work history was very informative. Thank you.

But I never know how to respond to these ... idunno ... descriptions? They are not sentences. I don't know the context you intend here?

Thanks.

I am much more proud of my personal, and families history in regards to treating and understanding deficits of self-regulation, than any of the many emotional job experiences I have had to date.

What I really want is to attend school when I finish my present job, and hope to work in a play sanctuary, in the future.

I have been practicing for years.

Awareness requires that the individual have the conscious precognitive emotional-affective drive to want to be cognitively aware.

There are 3 types of affects.

I am focusing on emotional affects because of their psychological value.

All humans are born with an homologous emotional-affective temperament, made up of genetic homologous unconditioned emotional response systems, that produce genetic homologous unconditioned raw emotional behaviors.

Genetic homologous raw emotional-affective behaviors are SEEKING, RAGE, FEAR, LUST, CARE, GRIEF, PLAY.

It is easiest "vision" affective topics by considering the early preverbal infant/toddler ages stages of development before cognitive verbal stages of development mature.

Following me so far, I could start over with new thread focusing on every term more specifically if you want?

G

aeon
10-10-16, 07:51 PM
A real good stereo system and Adderall and Dexedrine.

Closest to my truth to be sure, but I would go amiss if I did not mention and champion the benefits of loving touch...giving or receiving, human or animal, or a mix thereof. http://www.sympato.ch/smileys/Yaisse.gif


Cheers,
Ian

Lunacie
10-10-16, 08:58 PM
Thanks.

I am much more proud of my personal, and families history in regards to treating and understanding deficits of self-regulation, than any of the many emotional job experiences I have had to date.

What I really want is to attend school when I finish my present job, and hope to work in a play sanctuary, in the future.

I have been practicing for years.

Awareness requires that the individual have the conscious precognitive emotional-affective drive to want to be cognitively aware.

There are 3 types of affects.

I am focusing on emotional affects because of their psychological value.

All humans are born with an homologous emotional-affective temperament, made up of genetic homologous unconditioned emotional response systems, that produce genetic homologous unconditioned raw emotional behaviors.

Genetic homologous raw emotional-affective behaviors are SEEKING, RAGE, FEAR, LUST, CARE, GRIEF, PLAY.

It is easiest "vision" affective topics by considering the early preverbal infant/toddler ages stages of development before cognitive verbal stages of development mature.

Following me so far, I could start over with new thread focusing on every term more specifically if you want?

G


Awareness requires that the individual have the conscious precognitive emotional-affective drive to want to be cognitively aware . . . to be aware of what exactly?

namazu
10-11-16, 10:39 AM
MODERATOR NOTE:

This thread has been moved from the Adult Diagnosis and Treatment section to the Open Science & Philosophical Discussion section because of the OP's stated desire to expand the thread to "discuss the affective topics that cognitive topics are built upon" and to include brain development and prevention of self-regulation deficits as well as treatment in the discussion.

All members should please keep in mind ADDF's etiquette guidelines (http://www.addforums.com/forums/announcement.php?f=75&a=90), especially:
Treat your fellow members with courtesy (especially if you disagree with them).

Thank you.

mildadhd
10-13-16, 11:54 PM
1)Awareness of how self-regulation develops, and 2)methyphenidate (SR)


G

Greyhound1
10-19-16, 01:40 AM
Thread has been re-opened after review.

mildadhd
10-31-16, 08:10 AM
1)Self-parenting, and 2) unconditional positive regard


G

SB_UK
10-31-16, 12:47 PM
1
global elimination of money +
2
global co-operative formation where all people voluntarily contribute to providing their own + needs of others

Since all voluntary - no payment required ie if 2 then 1

why an end to disorder through deficit in self-regulation ?
because in absence of need to engage in co-ercive (non-rewarding in and of themselves) - self regulation and therefore incapacity to self-regulate ie to make you do something you don't want to do - ceases to be a problem.

The ultimate treatment for a deficit in self-regulation is to see in a world in which self-regulation is no longer required.

mildadhd
10-31-16, 11:56 PM
1
global elimination of money +
2
global co-operative formation where all people voluntarily contribute to providing their own + needs of others

Since all voluntary - no payment required ie if 2 then 1

why an end to disorder through deficit in self-regulation ?
because in absence of need to engage in co-ercive (non-rewarding in and of themselves) - self regulation and therefore incapacity to self-regulate ie to make you do something you don't want to do - ceases to be a problem.

The ultimate treatment for a deficit in self-regulation is to see in a world in which self-regulation is no longer required.

Motivation is an emotional feeling, originating from the unconditioned SEEKING system. (Dopaminergic pathways)

I think humans would require better self-regulation, to control our conditioned dopaminergic desire/want for money.

G

Impromptu_DTour
11-01-16, 03:53 AM
i hope im responding in the right context.. im arc'ing right now (a term i describe my bp swings - .. 'swing' .. sounds so nice and gradual.. if only), and with a dual diagnosis the chicken and the egg can be slickly similar looking.

remedies for adhd.. im in the mindset where i can only be irritatingly general..

1) preventative.. (to identify behavioral triggers, and to enforce coping mechanisms... early)

2) medication.. (to neurochemically align the individual to respond -best- to efforts to nurture/groom those responses in step 1.. if step 1 alone does not produce results)

im convinced that parental bonds affect many things.. but if i were to specify adhd... it would be a floating 3'rd step that would rely heavilly on the output of the previous two.. maybe before 1.. maybe after.. maybe its just a step 3.. or maybe to (the individual) its not important at all.. i say that not about medication, because i know people who have very healthy relationships with their parents/guardians.. and have massive problems - yet i also know from experience that not having that relationship.. can contribute very easily to having problems. . . which leads me back.. to the importance of point 1. Coping mechanisms.

some people dont follow Erik Ericson's model. Some people dont follow any developmental model at all.. while -always- important.. its difficult to determine where in the hierarchy it seats. so in my mind it floats.. unless by case.. its more important as a therapeutic consideration than the other two. being as adhd is as emotionally based as it is.. (for me at least).. maybe paternal/maternal bonds cant be addressed until after medication.. i myself have vacillated.

imo

iDTour

(i mean.. ive definately vacillated.. i mean imo as per my priority and why)

SB_UK
11-01-16, 09:34 AM
Motivation is an emotional feeling, originating from the unconditioned SEEKING system. (Dopaminergic pathways)

I think humans would require better self-regulation, to control our conditioned dopaminergic desire/want for money.

G

The only good use for heroin is no use for heroin.

Or as the master of leptin once said.

Wait till the movie's available to rent and then don't rent it.

mildadhd
11-03-16, 10:33 PM
Thanks for the physiological introduction to leptin.

An emerging concept in the field of leptin neurobiology also implicates other non-hypothalamic brain regions in mediating the central effects of leptin. These regions include, but are not limited to, the midbrain [23,30], the hippocampus [40], and the hindbrain [26]...

Leptin Secretion during Important Periods of Brain Development..

..The ingestion of fat contained in the mother's milk represents a plausible cause for the increase in leptin expression during the first weeks of postnatal life. Dietary fat can influence leptin expression [44], and fat is abundant in rodent milk ranging from 22% in colostrum to 9% in late milk [41]. After weaning, there is a coordinated decrease in levels of leptin mRNA and leptin peptide [2,20] when pups switch from maternal milk to an adult diet. Leptin transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) also appears to be developmentally regulated [7]. The short form of the leptin receptor, LepRa, which is considered to be one of the main transporters for leptin across the BBB [27,33], is expressed in brain microvessels at birth [47]. Analysis of leptin transport across the BBB also reveals that the hormone can reach the brain at early ages [47].


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3654158/#!po=5.55556

G

SB_UK
11-11-16, 11:58 AM
I wonder what a caveman would have said to the idea that human beings need 3 meals a day ?

Lunacie
11-11-16, 12:14 PM
I wonder what a caveman would have said to the idea that human beings need 3 meals a day ?

Are you saying that our early ancestors may not have had adhd symptoms because their diet was different than ours? Hmm.

I think the cavemen wandered around a lot looking for game. As they wandered they grabbed plants that they noticed in passing and chewed on those as they walked.

If they caught any game they made a big fire at night and cooked the meat. So kinda snacking during the day and the big meal was supper. More activity, less sitting around.

If some of the cavemen had adhd symptoms, they may have missed some of the chances to get game animals because they were too impatient or couldn't wait quietly and scared the game away. So they might bring back more plant food to share.

Better suited to be a gatherer than a hunter?

mildadhd
11-12-16, 05:13 AM
I wonder what a caveman would have said to the idea that human beings need 3 meals a day ?

I do not know, but I would assume cavebabies would require about the same essential needs as housebabies, during infancy/toddlerhood stage?

mildadhd/Peripheral


G

SB_UK
11-13-16, 03:17 PM
4 hour meal separation is something to do with the shift to high GI carbs.

I don't think we were ever meant to go there.

fruit + veg (all of the chaps that grow above the ground)

Dexedrine and ritalin work on the same interval.

SB_UK
11-13-16, 03:35 PM
Name two types of treatment for deficits of self-regulationblood glucose maintenance

change diet (like the Hunter Gatherers - plants growing above the ground)
chill out (like the Hunter/Gatherers in their day long hikes to find food)
persistent aerobic exercise (like the Hunter/Gatherers during their time spent on the road looking for food)

It's all about food !!

No food No breathe.

Persistent selection for people that didn't need much energy to survive.

Fast forward to 2016 and the lucky few find themselves suffering from severe diabesity.

Back to the Hunter/Gatherer life except with no need for any animal product.

Just don't let that blood glucose level waggle around.