View Full Version : Anybody Have Experience with ADHD Coaching?


20thcenturyfox
10-12-16, 10:03 PM
I have seen many references to ADHD coaches in North America, and wondered how this has worked out for other people in terms of cost and benefit.

Recently I also read this interesting article on "strength-based ADHD coaching" clinics which have apparently sprung up in the Netherlands outside the public health system. http://sgo.sagepub.com/content/spsgo/6/3/2158244016662498.full.pdf

So I wonder if anyone here has tried any type of coaching. What sort of results did you see? What would you say were the best parts? The worst parts? Would you recommend it to others? What features or qualities would you say are most important to the success of coaching?

ToneTone
10-12-16, 10:31 PM
Wow! ... Thanks for bringing the article to our attention. Fascinating.

I hired a coach for my ADHD about six years ago ... I met her at a Chadd support group meeting, where she came to speak. She was a therapist and a coach ... and most of her coaching was for business people apparently. But she uttered two sentences and all of us in the room understood that she got ADHD.

And how I came to hire her reminds me of a point in the article.

On the way out of the meeting, she told us she was planning to start an adult ADHD support group ... and then she challenged us ... she said: "I want you to email me listing five of your strengths."

Well, I actually emailed her ... The support group never ran, but in its place she agree to give me very discounted coaching sessions ... over the phone ... She had a ton of great ideas ... She would listen to me describe confusion at my job or complicated tasks and she had a mind for how to make the tasks easier ... I'm still using some of her tips ...

But yes, she was the first person I encountered who said, "If you have ADHD, it's absolutely vital that you maximize your strengths." And I get that the people in the article feel like the coaches--not the therapists--emphasized and built on their strengths.

The funny thing now is that I've been with the same therapist for a number of years, and frankly, our sessions are like coaching sessions. We focus on what's going on ... what I'm dealing with in each week ... Sure, I've got old wounds and pain that we sometimes dig into ... But we focus on fine-tuning things right now, and he highlights my strengths.

Anyway, great article. Yes, I think the right coach can be of enormous help. I have to say: I didn't immediately put into practice what I learned from the coach, but gradually in the past six years, I've been implementing more and more of her thinking.

Tone

anonymouslyadd
10-13-16, 01:42 AM
I loved my ADD coach! I listened to her and let her encourage me with strategies. I still use many things she taught me.

diagoro
10-13-16, 09:45 AM
One of the main points I recall from the book Driven to Distraction (first read it in the early 90s, but it changed my life in many ways) is that those with ADD/ADHD function so much better with a coach. It could be a spouse, a close friend, or family member. But it has to be someone willing to be a protagonist, to help push us through the drudgery. I don't have one now, but know I had my most functional periods when someone in my life served this purpose, knowingly or not.

ToneTone
10-13-16, 05:34 PM
In an ideal world, where services were widely available--or we all had the resources--so many ADHDers would benefit from ongoing coaches.

Heck there are CEOs, people who have great administrative skills and organizational skills, who work with "executive coaches." Some companies quietly hire these coaches for their CEO's.

If CEO's can benefit from coaches, certainly ADHDers can as well.

Tone

20thcenturyfox
10-14-16, 02:21 PM
I notice anony posted a very helpful list in another thread more about specific tips the coach provided: http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=100053

Of my many other questions about the experience, some are:

Was all your coaching by telephone, or was any face to face? (One of my problems...that I need to solve but it isn't solved yet...is a phone phobia. I can use the phone but it is ridiculously stressful even when I do want to talk to the person.)

How did you minimize the problem of things "going in one ear and out the other?"

With many doctors being so clueless about ADHD and the most effective non-drug treatments, and even research on improving executive function being relatively sparse, where do ADHD coaches get their "expertise," and how confident should I be with their "certification?"

How much did it cost, and was there ever a point where you felt you had got the most value out of it to continue on your own? Or did you find that you just had to accept you couldn't function as well without a coach as with one? Did you quit because of the expense, or why?

Is anyone from Netherlands or elsewhere in Europe reading this? I would be interested to hear more about these "strength-based" clinics.

aeon
10-14-16, 03:17 PM
I went to an ADHD coach once, and she asked me: “Are you currently medicated?”

I said: “No, not currently.”

She replied: “You need to be medicated when you come to our coaching sessions.”

I said: “I can afford my Dexedrine, or sessions with you, but not both.”

She said: “In that case, you will be much better off budgeting for your medication.”

And that was that. Great advice, actually. http://www.sympato.ch/smileys/Yaisse.gif


Cheers,
Ian

ToneTone
10-14-16, 06:44 PM
My coach would have met with me in person ... It just would have cost more money ...

At the end of sessions, she would review what we discussed in clear and simple points ... and then she'd send me an email note with a list of what we covered ... and the steps I was going to try out in the next week.

Funny: I didn't even NOTICE how the coach made sure to review what we covered in each session and how she sent me notes after the sessions! She clearly understood ADHD.

Tone

hyper-not
11-07-16, 03:59 PM
I'm also curious about the different forms that coaching could take. I suppose that effectiveness would vary from person to person.

I'm not sure if I could afford to 'see' a person right now, but I'm also a bit phone phobic. Actually, I have a bit of a stammer and am somewhat slow in speech, so I often think that I could cover more territory with email. but I might be fooling myself there too.

Yet, as a person who doesn’t interact that much on social websites, I am a bit surprised at myself with the few posts that I have made on ADDF so far, as well as the responses received. It does give me a sense of being in a community, much more than reading books or listening to podcasts. It seems that, by extension, there could be a possibility of online coaching. It seems, in large part, it is trusting that there is a person on the other end that is holding you accountable in some way. I still need to read the article, though.

hyper-not
11-07-16, 04:21 PM
With many doctors being so clueless about ADHD and the most effective non-drug treatments, and even research on improving executive function being relatively sparse, where do ADHD coaches get their "expertise," and how confident should I be with their "certification?"

I asked my last therapist who said that he specialized in ADHD, as well as my psychiatrist who diagnosed me, if they knew who Russell Barkley was. I figured that since I've heard that name bantered around enough times, that they would know. They didn't. But, doesn't CHADD support some kind of specialized training and certification?

sarahsweets
11-07-16, 09:04 PM
My adhd coach wouldnt talk with me unless I took a knee. ;)

Pilgrim
11-07-16, 10:21 PM
My adhd coach wouldnt talk with me unless I took a knee. ;)

We don't have ADD coaches as such but I contacted a friend who was the head of ADD awareness group, he gave me the number of a Psyciatrist who was just the ducks guts in order to coach and medicate one with ADD.

Cha Ching....

DaveyMSD
11-07-16, 11:50 PM
I'm looking/trying out coaches now - I'll update as I go through a session/meeting.

I'm debating either phone or in person. Phone is weird because well... It's an expensive phone chat... haha. But the nice thing is (if you're like me), is get some nice exercise in from wandering all over the place not being able to stand/sit still...

If anyone has a really good coach over the phone or any suggestions, I'd be glad to take them and try them out! I'm up in Toronto,Canada so if they're outside of Canada it would need to be Skype or something.

20thcenturyfox
11-08-16, 03:59 AM
I'm also curious about the different forms that coaching could take. I suppose that effectiveness would vary from person to person.

I'm not sure if I could afford to 'see' a person right now, but I'm also a bit phone phobic. ...

I have become seriously phone phobic only in the last few years! I cause myself to miss out on many things because of it, and you're just reminding me that ADHD coaching was one of them when I looked into it once. I didn't think I could persist with anything that depended on my making or taking an actual phone call. Just too high a price at that point in my life.

This is the first time I have ever seen another soul mention it. Reminds me I meant to start a thread asking if there were any others with this strange avoid-session.

sarahsweets
11-08-16, 04:50 AM
We don't have ADD coaches as such but I contacted a friend who was the head of ADD awareness group, he gave me the number of a Psyciatrist who was just the ducks guts in order to coach and medicate one with ADD.

Cha Ching....

Every time I forgot to put the skills I learned in to practice I had to run laps.;)