View Full Version : Is the person you are while on ADHD medication who you are really supposed to be?


italianstallion
10-13-16, 11:49 PM
I'm wondering if your thought process while on medication is how you should be thinking normally/ if you didn't have ADHD. Should you make major decisions while on medication? When are you thinking more as your true self, when you are on vyvanse/aderall etc. or when you are not? Is what you really want more accurate when on meds or when you're not etc. I'm curious because I definitely feel differently when on the meds, more confident and less worrisome everything seems like it will work out ok than when I am not on medication and don't want to make a major decision based on how I felt while on medication that I will end up regretting.

peripatetic
10-14-16, 12:20 AM
It's all me, medicated and not. With psychiatric medications in general I tend to make much better decisions when taking medication and disastrous ones when not. My ADHD is currently unmedicated and impulsivity definitely affects my life. My initial approach to life isn't always the most productive/functional one.

Cyllya
10-14-16, 01:30 AM
If your medication is new for you, you probably want to wait to make major decisions so you can get an idea of how it affects you. ADHD meds can cause euphoria, which can entail being overly optimistic, but this is usually only true at the beginning of treatment or after increasing the dose. They can also cause the opposite effect. On the other hand, untreated ADHD symptoms can also cause you to be needlessly anxious (and of course, needlessly impulsive).

Even outside of drug-related changes, I'm used to the idea of moods (and abilities, somewhat) changing for physiological reasons. I consider some moods more accurate than others, but I wouldn't consider myself to have a huge change in identity.

C15H25N3O
10-14-16, 06:46 AM
I think it is absolutely ok to make major decisions on amphetamines

while you still can think about them twice.


Amphetamines improve symptoms of ADHD which makes someone a

better personality if taken at a correct adjusted medical dosage.


Every decision made with self-confidence no matter if spontaneously

or rationally checked is a good decision.


If you might think it is not you while being on the meds maybe due to

being over the top or any irrational feeling it can be a good idea to try

decreasing the dosage. Why not? It is all about feeling more comfortable

not about feeling the med but feeling to be a different person.

Bluechoo
10-14-16, 08:31 AM
Me making decisions without meds: I will have a half-***** picture of the pros and cons, and will wait until time forces me to make up my mind.

Me making decisions on meds: I will research all the pros and cons of all the decisions and make a calculated decision promptly, with back-up plans in case things do not work out...

I'm going to stay with the latter as long as I can manage.

Pilgrim
10-14-16, 09:34 AM
I'm definitely better on meds, or I wouldn't be on them. That being said I've had times where the line between reality and pure fatigue is pretty thin.
I very often get this impression that people thing your turboing your brain and everything will be sweet. Not really for me, I've still got to work hard to get things happening for me.

I really didn't start taking medication till 37 and I can remember whole years that I got very little done. I look back now and realise I just couldn't do it. I was really in survival mode.
A couple of guys that I work with have made comments, I think the jist is, ' why?'

**** them.

Corina86
10-14-16, 05:32 PM
I don't feel I have a different personality when medicated. I'm just more focused and I have more energy. I'm more likely to take a decision while on meds, because without them, I just linger and procrastinate until somehow the decision gets taken for me (not always in the best way for me).

italianstallion
10-17-16, 02:34 PM
I don't feel I have a different personality when medicated. I'm just more focused and I have more energy. I'm more likely to take a decision while on meds, because without them, I just linger and procrastinate until somehow the decision gets taken for me (not always in the best way for me).

I can definitely relate to this. I am definitely more focused and have more energy which I guess in turn boosts my confidence and allows me to do things that are good which I wouldn't when I am unmedicated because I am not paying attention and miss out on opportunities because I am withdrawn and procrastinating most of the time. Or, I will only act when engaged, never being able to make the first move etc. Thank you all for your insight I appreciate it.

Pilgrim
10-17-16, 07:46 PM
I don't feel I have a different personality when medicated. I'm just more focused and I have more energy. I'm more likely to take a decision while on meds, because without them, I just linger and procrastinate until somehow the decision gets taken for me (not always in the best way for me).

This is correct. I find I have a more broader view, more insight. But it doesn't work all the time. Thank you meds, helps me when I really suck at organising and categorising things.

Lymbyc
10-17-16, 07:55 PM
This is correct. I find I have a more broader view, more insight. But it doesn't work all the time. Thank you meds, helps me when I really suck at organising and categorising things.

I know exactly how all of you feel here. I just got diagnosed with ADHD last week by my neurologist, and started on Adderall last week as well. I felt like I could do anything, and gained an optimistic view on things. Before taking the medicine I knew I was a glass half-empty person, who procrastinated on homework, and only did well in subjects that I liked. Now, I am doing well in all of my classes, holding a B average with an A in AP psychology. For some people they may have felt that the change was a hinderance to them, but I felt like this was a huge help to me.

aeon
10-17-16, 10:49 PM
I'm myself, meds or no meds.

With meds, I don't just live for the day, I can support myself, I make good decisions about what to eat, I am on time for things, I'm much less labile in mood, I'm safe to drive on the public roads, my social anxiety is gone, and on and on...

But...

I'm still a daydreamer, a stimulation-seeker, I'm still impatient in traffic, I still cry easily, I still hate queuing, I still love to tell smutty jokes that might be inappropriate for the audience, I still seat dance and drum in the car, intrusive noise can still drive me crazy...

And in any case, I am polite and friendly and playful.

I'm me, always. Sometimes I'm me on Dexedrine. It helps me in some ways, but I'm incorrigible regardless.


Cheers,
Ian

sarahsweets
10-18-16, 01:40 AM
I think I am a decent person and I think that I would be off or on meds. On meds I can use the decent part of me to make decisions and act in a way that shows my fellow human all I have to offer.

Dachshund
10-18-16, 09:05 AM
I feel like I'm more of the person I always knew I was when I'm on meds. Take away the anxiety, the overthinking, the obsessing, and I just feel more...me. It's like all the noise is gone and finally I can come out and just enjoy my own personality.

It's kinda like my brain can connect the dots now. So if I'm meeting a new person, I no longer dwell on whether or not they like me, am I dressed appropriately for them, am I talking too much, etc. It just becomes me listening and chatting with a new person. If they like me, they like me. If they don't, the world won't end. Instead of my brain running all over the place, connecting random dots, it now just says, "Hey, lets accomplish step one of just talking!"

It's like I have perspective now.