View Full Version : What do you do for a living?


sampeckinpah
10-14-16, 07:23 PM
Hello, Im just wondering if you guys want to share what you do for a career! And how ADHD effects your daily job and how you manage it at work. I need some inspiration, I have been laid off for 5 months from a job i went to college for and I'm feeling pretty hopeless. I feel like having ADHD is going to force me to work in a low paying job for the rest of my life. Is there even any jobs that are good for someone with ADHD? Impulsiveness, bad focus , slow working memory, forgetfulness, etc.. they all seem pretty crippling for any job even with medication. Its been 2 weeks since I started medication and Im trying to learn strategies but I feel very hopeless for any kind of employment. Thanks everyone!

aeon
10-14-16, 08:05 PM
I run on a wheel, and sometimes they give me kibble.

I was pacing outside of work tonight, laughing like I was
raving mad because it struck me just how ridiculous it is.

This job would be hard for anybody. But the way it is hard
makes it something special for someone with ADHD like
myself. Itís become comical, itís so laughable. Itís almost
like something from a bad sitcom to have someone with
ADHD, severe at that, do this job.

I mean, I was crying, crying hard, but it was in that moment
it really struck me, and so I was laughing in a way that made
me sound like I was losing it.

Career? Haha, whatís that? :lol:

I think I have lost the plot. :doh:


Um, yeah,
Ian

sampeckinpah
10-14-16, 08:26 PM
that was a great post, I was picturing everything in my head haha I enjoyed reading that quite a bit especially because I relate to most of it and how well written that was.

acdc01
10-15-16, 09:03 PM
I've been working about 20 years as a civil engineer.

It's not actually the low paying jobs that are the easiest for us sometimes, it's the ones that give us the most flexibility which are often the high paying ones.

Adhd causes me to procrastinate, have difficulties paying attention, work slower on some tasks cause I lose focus.

But I still produce good work on time cause I often throw sveral coping solutions at a time on a problem I have. Also, I work smarter, not harder so because my approach is more effective than others, I can finish just as effeciently or even moreso than my counterparts.

One of the biggest problems I have are not doing the things I need to do to get ahead that aren't part of my defined work. Like shmoozing and marketing. That matters more than doing a good job. Also I can keep my performance up but I can't hide my symptoms which make some people think less of me. Finally, I can't bring myself to look for jobs anymore so I stay stuck in the same job I no longer want for a very long time.

I'm pretty much burned out now but I did last for quite a long time. If there are government jobs in your field and they are like the ones where I live, I'd consider applying. By like where I live I mean they won't fire you no matter how much you suck.

casper
10-16-16, 09:12 PM
I do food. I have done everything from country clubs, restaurants, bars, banquets, hospitals, hotels, camps, and a little teaching thrown in

john2100
10-17-16, 12:16 AM
Hello, Im just wondering if you guys want to share what you do for a career! And how ADHD effects your daily job and how you manage it at work. I need some inspiration, I have been laid off for 5 months from a job i went to college for and I'm feeling pretty hopeless. I feel like having ADHD is going to force me to work in a low paying job for the rest of my life. Is there even any jobs that are good for someone with ADHD? Impulsiveness, bad focus , slow working memory, forgetfulness, etc.. they all seem pretty crippling for any job even with medication. Its been 2 weeks since I started medication and Im trying to learn strategies but I feel very hopeless for any kind of employment. Thanks everyone!

Hi,
I was wondering if you were laid off because of performance issues connected to your ADHD or there was no reason given.
Whats your college major?

-There are many successful biznisman and people with professional careers with ADHD
-even low paying jobs require focus and self control and necessity to overcome your symptoms.
-When i'm at work, I am very productive and not influenced as much by adhd,I'm trying to fugure out why it is .

Bluechoo
10-17-16, 08:46 AM
I am substitute teaching, for now. It is a decent gig for a bachelor's degree. The flexibility is nice.

I went to school for chemistry as a pre-med student, dropped that idea, then I was not sure what I was going to do. Teaching is kind of fun, but I do not enjoy class-room management, so I am looking at getting started as a private tutor. As a private tutor you are really your own boss, and you can actually make more money than a teacher, especially if you have a STEM background.

Fuzzy12
10-17-16, 01:03 PM
I work in research and teaching at a university. I'm good at doing research, I'm good at teaching and I enjoy both but I'm so bad at everythung else that academia requires that I'm considering leaving it. I work better with structure and someone looking over my shoulder and giving me deadlines. The flexibility that academia affords and the self motivation and organisation that it requires make it very, very difficult for me.

midnightstar
10-17-16, 01:07 PM
I'm a cleaner :o cause that's the only job I could get :doh:

sampeckinpah
10-17-16, 01:58 PM
Hi,
I was wondering if you were laid off because of performance issues connected to your ADHD or there was no reason given.
Whats your college major?

-There are many successful biznisman and people with professional careers with ADHD
-even low paying jobs require focus and self control and necessity to overcome your symptoms.
-When i'm at work, I am very productive and not influenced as much by adhd,I'm trying to fugure out why it is .

I went to trade school for Air conditioning mechanic.
My employer - "I dont think you are fit to be in this job because you have bad problem solving skills, no common sense (i believe they thought this because I have a slow brain processing speed), you are very careless which caused you to make many mistakes and we have almost lost valuable customers from that, and you are very forgetful so you can't get the details when we tell you to do something.

I just sat there and looked at them in disappointment

20thcenturyfox
10-17-16, 04:00 PM
I went to trade school for Air conditioning mechanic.
My employer - "I dont think you are fit to be in this job because you have bad problem solving skills, no common sense (i believe they thought this because I have a slow brain processing speed), you are very careless which caused you to make many mistakes and we have almost lost valuable customers from that, and you are very forgetful so you can't get the details when we tell you to do something.

I just sat there and looked at them in disappointment

Not that it's anything to joke about, but on the bright side, at least you didn't go ballistic and wind up in jail! Many others would have. Give yourself credit: Not making a bad situation worse was a good first step.

Getting yourself diagnosed, medicated, and starting on some sort of psychosocial treatment program (CBT, MBCT, etc), ideally targeted to ADHD is a good 2nd step.

And regardless of whether you can find a suitable program, getting into a healthy routine of exercise, nutrition, socializing and sleep is usually a big challenge when you are unemployed, as is motivation in general. All 4 are proven to help general cognitive functioning, so anything you can do to ramp up your self-care habits will help you thrive as well as survive.

And coming here and asking a lot of questions, as you have done, is probably a good 4th step.

Career counselling is certainly not my area of expertise, but if you went to a technical school for your mechanical training, could you go back there for either an assessment of your occupational strengths and weaknesses and/or some ideas of related occupations and employers in your area?

The one area that jumps out at me (if you are as socially adept as you seem) would be technical sales, where your mechanical background would help you represent your employer and relate to the customers, but you wouldn't be having to work alone solving problems under time pressure. I think a lot of successful sales people have organizational challenges, which they can compensate for in various ways, including software, apps and secretarial assistance. Just a thought.

sampeckinpah
10-17-16, 04:31 PM
Getting yourself diagnosed, medicated, and starting on some sort of psychosocial treatment program (CBT, MCBT, etc), ideally targeted to ADHD is a good 2nd step.

I would really like to do CBT or MBCT, actually I think MBCT sounds a little more appeasing to me or could i do both? This is all really good advice, and I have been exercising daily, and seeing a career counselor who actually told me I should get checked for adhd and she turned out to be right haha. Its really hard to find a job, Ive applied for those salesman jobs in mechanical field and nobody ever calls back, maybe because of my inconsistent job list on my resume. I have been in the selection process for a border officer job but would that even be a good job for someone with ADHD? I've been taking my meds daily but I haven't noticed a huge difference, a little bit of a difference but like Im still getting distracted, unmotivated, impulsive and forgetful, could this be too low of a dose? Im on 20 mg generic ritalin sr.

john2100
10-17-16, 07:57 PM
I went to trade school for Air conditioning mechanic.
My employer - "I dont think you are fit to be in this job because you have bad problem solving skills, no common sense (i believe they thought this because I have a slow brain processing speed), you are very careless which caused you to make many mistakes and we have almost lost valuable customers from that, and you are very forgetful so you can't get the details when we tell you to do something.

I just sat there and looked at them in disappointment

How could you then get a certificate to work as a technician? If you were as bad as your ex-boss had suggested , you would not be able to pass a final exam right?

When I started at my job(technician sort off) my boss told me after a week.
"You have no talent for this work, you have no manual skills,no technical thinking , no understanding of what we are doing here. You are the worst I have even seen. Just go back to painting, because you will never ever work in this trade and forget now about ever owning your own business. "

I had to agree with that, that my skills were far behind compering with others, but insane determination and working smart by creating systems,procedures,checklist and evry day after work I was making notes of how Could I have solved it better and all the mistakes to avoid in the future.

After 3 years I 've had my own business and I think that my knowledge in this trade (15 years now) already exceeded my ex-bosses knowledge,as I did many improvements in regards to efficiency and quality , while his guys are still doing the same mistakes as I was doing while working for him .

That being said, experience can replace your lack off.......whatever you can think of.

I think that many people,especially in construction and repair trade had similar experience when they started as you have had.

I would find another job as soon as possible in air conditioning.
After 2 years of practical experience you will make really good money too.

And i can give you an advice, dont tell anyone you work for or work with ,that you have ADHD. I can't think of one reason that would be helpful,but as soon as they know, it will become a liability sort of for them .

john2100
10-17-16, 08:20 PM
And one more thing,

The fact that you were able to finish this trade school without medication , may be a sign that you can manage your symptoms even without meds , better then you think .

For me medication wasn't really good for that kind of work that i do ,as a technician.

When i was on adderall , It gave me motivation to work , but also a tunel vision . I wasn't able to see obvious solutions to the problem I have solved many times in the past. It made me think I was able to solve anything , but once the meds would wear off , I would see much better and more efficient solution.

Adderall gave me focus ,which was demonstrated in the way , that i could plan better on the job. I would know I have to take this 16 tools, I would also plan better to increase efficiency. The downside was however sort of a over stimulation or overconfidence. Sometimes I would do a stupid mistake becase I was too confident. Many times however I could't see the obvious solution .I sort of knew that I'm supposed to know it, but I just coun't figure it out. That was a big negative. I went down to 1/2 dosage which was at that time 5mg IR x 2 a day, Original script was 10mg IR 2xday. But eventually just stopped on my onsite jobs days.

I could see good benefits when I was working in my office , but not on the jobsite , because it made me look really dumb in front of my contractors . If you have similar chemistry then I do , then meds may really make you dumb at your work as a technician.

I was on meds only past 2 years. So I could see the difference right away, how it effected me at jobsite, after a month , I was off of it my jobsite days.
I was making less of those small mistakes while on adderal at work , but inability to see the obvious solution just made me abandon the idea of adderal at work.

ritalin didnt do much for me and concerta made me more social .

sampeckinpah
10-17-16, 08:24 PM
That being said, experience can replace your lack off.......whatever you can think of.

I think that many people,especially in construction and repair trade had similar experience when they started as you have had.

I would find another job as soon as possible in air conditioning.
After 2 years of practical experience you will make really good money too.

And i can give you an advice, dont tell anyone you work for or work with ,that you have ADHD. I can't think of one reason that would be helpful,but as soon as they know, it will become a liability sort of for them .

That was inspirational! thank you for that, I really wanted to get a job in my trade again but after being laid off and looking for 5 months for another job in this trade, I could not find another one. I was alone most of the time when I was working so when I made a mistake nobody would know except the customer 3 months down the road, then I would get a call back. When I was looking for a job nobody ever wanted to hire me, I told them I would like to have an employer that would provide me with the proper training and not rush me so I dont make mistakes (due to my ADHD - I didnt tell them that tho), I want to believe that I could of done well in this trade if I was diagnosed and had my medication but now I will never know because I cant get another opportunity. So I gave up and started looking for a job that ADHD would work well with but Im just so confused

sampeckinpah
10-17-16, 08:32 PM
I think I did well in trade school because I memorized everything in my book and the multiple tests were just easy. Like when i was working I would forget to put panels back on, or forget to screw in a pulley stuff like that. There was definitely times where I didnt know things because I was working alone so I made mistakes and improper diagnosis too. But I would say mostly all of my mistakes were from being careless and I would always want to get the job done fast. I dont know why, I would rush then I would make mistakes

aeon
10-17-16, 08:33 PM
I do:


accounting (A/R, A/P, payroll, purchasing, tax stuff, bank account management)
receptionist (for front door and phone switchboard)
office manager
IT
HR

and sometimes:


prepress
make plates
run digital presses

And throughout it all, that damned phone is ringing. :faint:

Without Dexedrine, I am well and truly ******.


Cheers,
Ian

john2100
10-17-16, 08:34 PM
I would really like to do CBT or MBCT, actually I think MBCT sounds a little more appeasing to me or could i do both? This is all really good advice, and I have been exercising daily, and seeing a career counselor who actually told me I should get checked for adhd and she turned out to be right haha. Its really hard to find a job, Ive applied for those salesman jobs in mechanical field and nobody ever calls back, maybe because of my inconsistent job list on my resume. I have been in the selection process for a border officer job but would that even be a good job for someone with ADHD? I've been taking my meds daily but I haven't noticed a huge difference, a little bit of a difference but like Im still getting distracted, unmotivated, impulsive and forgetful, could this be too low of a dose? Im on 20 mg generic ritalin sr.


I know what you are going through. Let me just tell you ,that meds for adhd aren' t perfect . If you are low on vitD you will take vidD suplement and it's 100% working for everybody every time. Not these freaking meds.

ADHD medication are not perfect. Thats the reason why you have 1000's of posts about ADHD meds and very little about VitD suplements not working.

ADHD meds try to replicate normal brain chemistry , but so far it hasn't been successful . ADHD meds are not able to replicate healthy brain chemistry.
Even thou they make life of some people better , you kind of feel and know meds didn;t make you as normal as non-ADHD people.

acdc01
10-17-16, 08:41 PM
I'd get more vitd too if you are low but I wouldn't give up on meds until you've tried higher dosages and different meds. They don't solve all problems but they do seem to help many.

I'm surprised you can't find a job in ac. You'd be in high demand where I live. Would you be willing to relocate to get a job or would that be not worth it?

It really is about setting up a system that works. At least for me anyway. So we can improve a lot once we've had time to set up that system. I wouldnt take a job where you work on your own right away. I'm surprised they had you do that. Seems like poor business practice to let a newbie go all alone.

sampeckinpah
10-17-16, 08:48 PM
I'd get more vitd too if you are low but I wouldn't give up on meds until you've tried higher dosages and different meds. They don't solve all problems but they do seem to help many.

I'm surprised you can't find a job in ac. You'd be in high demand where I live. Would you be willing to relocate to get a job or would that be not worth it?

It really is about setting up a system that works. At least for me anyway. So we can improve a lot once we've had time to set up that system. I wouldnt take a job where you work on your own right away. I'm surprised they had you do that. Seems like poor business practice to let a newbie go all alone.

I recently started taking a multi-vitamin, it has vitamin d in it, the daily intake is 1250%, i dont know if thats healthy though. I tried to get a job everywhere in Canada and wanted to move to USA to get a job but it seemed impossible. Yeah it definitely was poor business practice and they even said to me after they fired me, it might be better to find a company that will provide you training because we really didnt.

sampeckinpah
10-17-16, 08:52 PM
I do:


accounting (A/R, A/P, payroll, purchasing, tax stuff, bank account management)
receptionist (for front door and phone switchboard)
office manager
IT
HR

and sometimes:


prepress
make plates
run digital presses

And throughout it all, that damned phone is ringing. :faint:

Without Dexedrine, I am well and truly ******.


Cheers,
Ian

And Aeon that is literally mind blowing amazing, you are like a super hero, I dont know how you do it. Now that I read this post the first post you made makes a lot more sense haha

john2100
10-17-16, 09:06 PM
That was inspirational! thank you for that, I really wanted to get a job in my trade again but after being laid off and looking for 5 months for another job in this trade, I could not find another one. I was alone most of the time when I was working so when I made a mistake nobody would know except the customer 3 months down the road, then I would get a call back. When I was looking for a job nobody ever wanted to hire me, I told them I would like to have an employer that would provide me with the proper training and not rush me so I dont make mistakes (due to my ADHD - I didnt tell them that tho), I want to believe that I could of done well in this trade if I was diagnosed and had my medication but now I will never know because I cant get another opportunity. So I gave up and started looking for a job that ADHD would work well with but Im just so confused


1.Point
I think that your negative work experience is definitely your employers mistake not yours. How could they let a new guy just out of trade school work all -by himself? Aren;t you as a employer worried if the guy can really do it ? I don't think there is even one person who could work in this trade right away in the field from trade school all by himself. When I hire someone, even if they have 10y of experience in the filed, they will work with me or someone else for at least 1 month, so I definitively know how he thinks, what are the weakness , strong sites, and only then I would slowly let him work allbyhimsleve , but still not everyday and every time. It takes usually 1 year of relatively mistake free work for me to know that the guy can be let all by himselve.

So definitely employer and management mistake.

There will be many more chances , why do you give up so easily?
I could give you many examples where ADHD will effect you negativli so career change will not help you ,if you really want to believe that its the ADHD that is causing all of this .

If you get a job as a salesman you may do this becasue of ADHD:
-forget to call clients
-loose clients info
-loose receits
-mixup contacts info
-make mistakes when making orders
etc...

So you see ,a career change will not help you . If you really believe that only if you had this perfect job where adhd is not and issue, I will bet you anything, that you will end-up changing carer for the rest of your life.Until you finily realize that adhd is not the end of the world and with enogh motivation and positive attitude as training you can have any carrer. There are doctors for good sake with ADHD so why not a border agent ,just for the sake of argument. A doctor with ADHD is not worried about mixing meds for patients?

20thcenturyfox
10-17-16, 09:13 PM
I'd get more vitd too if you are low but I wouldn't give up on meds until you've tried higher dosages and different meds. They don't solve all problems but they do seem to help many.

I'm surprised you can't find a job in ac. You'd be in high demand where I live. Would you be willing to relocate to get a job or would that be not worth it?

Well, there could be more to it than that, since it's more common in my area, at least, for AC techs to do a broader line of HVAC mechanical. But global warming is a fond hope here, and AC is strictly seasonal.

And not to derail the thread, but a couple of posts have raised Vitamin D, so I will tell a story about that. Vit D deficiency, BTW has well-known links to depression. Several years after my previous depression & ADHD meds stopped working, I noticed that my Vitamin D had never been tested, so I asked about it. Answer was that provincial health care guidelines discourage routine testing because...are you ready?...virtually everyone in Canada is deficient!

But my doc was willing to insist (partly because of the depression dx, and partly because I've had skin cancer, so always wear sun-protection), so I got tested. And sure enough I was moderately deficient. But that was not the end of the story.

So for the next year I faithfully took the 1000 IU/day that was then the guideline. (And all this time the anti-depressants are doing nothing). The next year I was tested again. But it had gone down even more!

So last Dec the doc said to take 3000IU/day for 3 months and test again, which I did. Finally back into the low normal range, and incidentally starting to feel slightly better, despite quitting anti-depressants in anger at some point.

Moral of the story: Living at high latitudes puts you at high risk of Vit D deficiency unless you work outdoors or eat seal blubber. If you are deficient in October (after the summer) you will be even worse by next year. Get tested and take supplements.

john2100
10-17-16, 09:14 PM
I recently started taking a multi-vitamin, it has vitamin d in it, the daily intake is 1250%, i dont know if thats healthy though. I tried to get a job everywhere in Canada and wanted to move to USA to get a job but it seemed impossible. Yeah it definitely was poor business practice and they even said to me after they fired me, it might be better to find a company that will provide you training because we really didnt.

You can take up to 5000IU a day of Vit D without any problems. Most people are fine on 1000- 3000IU of vit D a day. I have to take even more bc of some healt issue, even 10,000 a day for a month or two. You can even take it on weekly basis and not daily. Your body can store vit D and use it efficiently even on weekly basis of 10,000IU or more of vid D once a week. But its better daily I think.

john2100
10-17-16, 09:24 PM
I think I did well in trade school because I memorized everything in my book and the multiple tests were just easy. Like when i was working I would forget to put panels back on, or forget to screw in a pulley stuff like that. There was definitely times where I didnt know things because I was working alone so I made mistakes and improper diagnosis too. But I would say mostly all of my mistakes were from being careless and I would always want to get the job done fast. I dont know why, I would rush then I would make mistakes

Those mistakes are typical sign of stress and being rushed. You brain is so stress out that you just can;t see the obvious mistake. And it's not because of adhd. This happens to everybody in one form or other under stress.
I used do this with measurements. I would measure 20'' but I would write down 30" and similar non-sense.
I have solved this by double checking everything where a mistake can have bad consequences
I still double check , many times I would go back out just to see if I really closed the cover or took that screwdriver . And I still make this mistakes when i rush .

Later in your career, you will still forget to put a panel on ,but it will be just carelessness and not a product of stress.

acdc01
10-17-16, 09:24 PM
I do:


accounting (A/R, A/P, payroll, purchasing, tax stuff, bank account management)
receptionist (for front door and phone switchboard)
office manager
IT
HR

and sometimes:


prepress
make plates
run digital presses

And throughout it all, that damned phone is ringing. :faint:

Without Dexedrine, I am well and truly ******.


Cheers,
Ian

You should tell your company to give you a raise cause you do the job of 5 people.

sampeckinpah
10-17-16, 09:28 PM
So really I just need to find an employer who is understanding and willing to train me? And just keep taking my ritalin and daily vitamins. It seems like a dream to find a boss who is going to actually want to help me with a job and get better instead of fire me. It makes sense how a career change is not going to help at all, I honestly thought that was going to fix my problems in my life. Its so hard to get a job when there is other people who are better qualified than me and dont have ADHD

john2100
10-17-16, 10:07 PM
So really I just need to find an employer who is understanding and willing to train me? And just keep taking my ritalin and daily vitamins. It seems like a dream to find a boss who is going to actually want to help me with a job and get better instead of fire me. It makes sense how a career change is not going to help at all, I honestly thought that was going to fix my problems in my life. Its so hard to get a job when there is other people who are better qualified than me and dont have ADHD

-Am not sure about canada, but here in the usa I see electricians, plumbers ,AC guys ,mechanics working in crews made out of experienced guys and fresh out of trade school. You just know it without even asking them . Those new guys are doing less technical work . These gives them opportunity to gather practical experiences. Also boss can see their attitude and if they even consistently show up to work , which has become a huge problem around here. Many times you see a crew of two . Experienced guy with a new guy from trade school.

quote "Its so hard to get a job when there is other people who are better qualified than me and dont have ADHD."
-I can guarantee you there are many guys in technical trade who have ADHD and work just fine. I'm one of them .
-A friend of mine who has a master degree and 2 bachelor degrees ,but no work experiences sent out 650 resumes and was invited to 15 interviews only over the past 2 years. He end up taking an entry level job , but after 2.5 yrs of waiting and just not giving up end up getting a dream job at a good company making really good money . That is some determination .


-well experienced guys are getting also better money . From what I see a new guy from trade school is getting from $12-15h , experienced guy with 5 years of exp. can make $25-$30/h and more per hour and $50/h and more as a subcontractor.
-You have to understand that economy grows, population grows and people are getting older and retiring. That the reasons why many companies are hiring new guys from trade schools .If no one was hiring inexperienced guys, there would be no trade schools left.

Why don't you contact your trade school , aren't they helping with job placement little bit? Also how well are doing your classmates who were studying for AC tech at the same time? Are they employed? The best way to get a job is by recommendation from a friend who is working already in the field.

aeon
10-17-16, 10:28 PM
You should tell your company to give you a raise cause you do the job of 5 people.

And yet, every month I make a decision: meds, or food.

Easy choice...get the Dex...makes life and the job somewhat manageable, and largely removes the need to eat! :yes:


Um, yeah,
Ian

john2100
10-17-16, 11:41 PM
When I was looking for a job nobody ever wanted to hire me, I told them I would like to have an employer that would provide me with the proper training and not rush me so I dont make mistakes

By saying this ,you are already implying that you haven't received a proper training and you were making too many mistakes . I think may be a reason for no positive response .

I would just tell them , I 've finished trade school ,little work experience. I think that a good employer will understand your position in the company .
If they are hiring new guys fresh from trade school on regular basis . A good boss already knows that their knowledge is limited. He will train you without you telling him . You could find out more by asking what will your job duties be and then you will get a better idea of what is expected from you .Also if you ask for top dollar you are expected to perform at that level.

sarahsweets
10-18-16, 03:42 AM
I'm a professional smart as* with a certification in sarcasm.

stef
10-18-16, 03:56 AM
And yet, every month I make a decision: meds, or food.


This is very not right, at all.

I'm a PA (personal assistant) in an international law firm.
My boss, is certifiably insane, although fundamentally a good person who appreciates creativity. I tend to make many mistakes and i have to be constantly vigilent; it's pure hell some days, cause he yells. and then other people need stuff too.

Otherwise, some aspects of this really suit me (especially working between French and English).

acdc01
10-18-16, 06:34 AM
This is very not right, at all.

I'm a PA (personal assistant) in an international law firm.
My boss, is certifiably insane, although fundamentally a good person who appreciates creativity. I tend to make many mistakes and i have to be constantly vigilent; it's pure hell some days, cause he yells. and then other people need stuff too.

Otherwise, some aspects of this really suit me (especially working between French and English).

That's not right either. Can you guys ask for a raise and tell him exactly how his yelling affects you respectively?

If he's a nice guy deep down, he'd at least try not to yell
Though yes, success is probably hard.

Aeon, you save the company from having to get IT help which is worth quite a lot. That's not even mentioning everything else you do. If you stood your ground, do you think you'd get a raise or be let go?

I'll have to say, I've stood my ground on something and I'm about to find out the reprocussions. I may be a little too self righteous, I'm not sure so take what I say with a grain of salt.

stef
10-18-16, 06:55 AM
That's not right either. Can you guys ask for a raise and tell him exactly how his yelling affects you respectively?

If he's a nice guy deep down, he'd at least try not to yell
Though yes, success is probably hard.



thanks; well I've been working for this person for several years and the issue has come up before (but usually not till I'm screechy, almost in tears and defensive, unfortunately).

it's not just that, it's sometimes speaking very unpleasant, condescending tone of voice that still rattles me. And he's even said not to take it personally.

At the same time he doesnt know how long a certain task will take ie let's say he wants a color printout of a bunch of excel stuff someone sent. He will say "that shouldnt have taken so long!!" or assume I forgot. but it's not just hitting print, because it's one attachment but the table has 10 tabs and each one needs to be reformatted ("landscape; fit all columns on one page").

Of course this constant pressure upsets me, thus doubling the potential for incredibly stupid mistakes which would annoy anyone.

At one point 2 or 3 years ago i finally said, "look if you want me to leave just say so and ill quit but stop making my life miserable" and he said, "no i just want you to improve!" and we stood there looking at each other like idiots for about 5 full seconds.

goodness sorry to hijack this thread! thanks for listening :)

Unmanagable
10-18-16, 08:09 AM
I'm a recovering state employee who worked in the vocational rehab arena for over 13 years. Had to resign to save my health, especially after taking on the system to point out multiple ongoing unethical business practices. I absolutely loved working with the students, but could no longer allow myself to be a representative of such willful and blatant wrong doing, especially knowing the effects they were having on the lives of others.

I now do sporadic p/t catering work for a favorite cafe' (when it doesn't entail dead flesh and animal products), help others on their farms with the veggies and harvesting and such, provide child care, provide fur baby care, cook for others, clean for others, craft and create cool stuff for others, teach hula hoop making and plant-based eating tips, and whatever else I can do to contribute, help out, earn some pocket change, or barter to meet my needs.

Prior to all of the above, I was an office manager/parts delivery/counter sales at an auto parts store; waitress at a local family restaurant; waitress/delivery at a local pizza joint; waitress at a local bbq joint; clerk at a local 7-11; manager at a go-cart track; helped cut, load, deliver, and rank fire wood; fast food worker; assistant manager at a convenience/gas store; bill collector at a local resort; cold call salesperson at a local photography studio; p/t industrial cleaner; accounts payable/accounts receivable clerk; and a couple other things that can't be noted on a resume'.

aeon
10-18-16, 12:08 PM
Aeon, you save the company from having to get IT help which is worth quite a lot. That's not even mentioning everything else you do. If you stood your ground, do you think you'd get a raise or be let go?

Iím not sure really. But inasmuch as I am privy to the money, both detailed, and in the overall picture, right now I will bide my time, watch and wait.


Thanks,
Ian

EuropeanADHD
10-18-16, 03:24 PM
I'm an underpaid management consultant doing something between IT and business consulting.

I love working with clients and creativity of the job, learning new things, solving practical problems.

I hate the hierarchies in my own company and trying to obey them and to not be sincere and straightforward, the plenty of useless stuff people from my company do internally to show they are useful, sexism. I hate "the consultant type" of people working in my company, i.e. those smiling on the outside but wanting to destroy you on the inside. All for money. And constant travels drive me nuts. I hope I will be able to change soon to something similar but with better conditions.

I'm a very strange consultant, feel I don't fit in very well, I'm too critical. Clients love it, for some reasons. My bosses don't.

I worked in research before but conditions were even worse.

I think we need a revolution. Things are going from bad to worse with several families getting ridiculously rich and the others...

ucrenegade
11-15-16, 11:10 AM
considering I think I have SCT and do have diagnosis of

ulcerative colitis
depression (dhiystamia)
autism spectrum
PTSD
anxiety
ADD
Back issues from being stabbed

I can't hold a job to save my life. The sad thing is I could probably work if their were no time limits,people left me alone,and multitasking was not needed, I could go to the bathroom whenever i wanted, and no repetitive heavy lifting but i told my counselor good luck trying to find a job where a boss will let you do that.

DaveyMSD
11-15-16, 09:39 PM
I fix and maintain elevators!

Elevator Technician =)

sarahsweets
11-16-16, 05:40 AM
I'm a recovering state employee who worked in the vocational rehab arena for over 13 years.
I love this part!

Caco3girl
11-16-16, 04:04 PM
So really I just need to find an employer who is understanding and willing to train me? And just keep taking my ritalin and daily vitamins. It seems like a dream to find a boss who is going to actually want to help me with a job and get better instead of fire me. It makes sense how a career change is not going to help at all, I honestly thought that was going to fix my problems in my life. Its so hard to get a job when there is other people who are better qualified than me and dont have ADHD

This is called an apprenticeship. You have been taught a skill but have yet to put it to practical use.

I do not have ADHD, but I am VERY familiar with the HVAC industry and I live in the US. In the US they don't allow a tech to go into the field by themselves, they pretty much pair you with an older person who has been doing it for 20 years so they catch all the things you will screw up. It's expected that the new guy will screw up because houses and blue prints don't always match what you learned in the books.

Why can't you go out an apply to another HVAC company and pretend like you JUST got out of school. However, this time, ask about a more experienced person shadowing you.

aeon
11-17-16, 01:50 PM
I fix and maintain elevators!

Elevator Technician =)

I bet that line of work has its ups and downs. :giggle:

Thank you, thank you, Iíll be here the rest of the evening, please donít forget to tip your waitress. :p


Couldnít help myself,
Ian

sarahsweets
11-18-16, 06:11 AM
Actually,I am just a mom. Wish I could be paid for it-lord knows I have put in my share of overtime.

Jenn1202
11-28-16, 10:18 PM
I'm still trying to figure out "what I wanna do when I grow up". I used to be a software developer but then I decided to quit because I couldn't tolerate my ADD medication anymore so I couldn't focus on my work. Since then I've tried waiting tables, sales (cold calling) and newspaper delivery but none of these jobs seemed to work for me (I got fired or extremely bored within a couple of weeks). A few days ago I started working as a customer service representative, we'll c how it goes.

Goofycook
11-30-16, 07:34 PM
I cook for an ADD friendly organization. my faults are over looked as they were not on the two jobs before.My creativity is welcomed with open arms.

Jenn1202
12-14-16, 02:10 PM
failing at life.

JosieK
12-14-16, 03:10 PM
I used to work in retail. Now I work at a call center. I always have supervisors getting irritated with me for spending too much time away from my desk. I get too bored and too fidgety to sit for that long.

jkimbo
12-14-16, 03:42 PM
I am a tech support for medical professionals. I deal mostly with doctors and nurses and other techs.

Funky1
12-14-16, 09:29 PM
I drive a garbage truck. Keeps me in shape, busy, and entertained. Also pays really well for not needing a degree.

Smokey405
12-14-16, 09:36 PM
Senior accountant for the health department. Prior to that, accountant/office manager/pharmacy tech for a small independent pharmacy.

In both instances, I had the luxury of not being constantly confined in my office. I can get up and move about and currently can go to different departments to address issues and such with them in person. Having that luxury is awesome for me since I am very much on the hyperactive side and hate sitting still or in one place for too long.

Johnny Slick
12-15-16, 03:44 PM
I'm a web developer who was only veeeerry recently (as in last week) diagnosed. It works really really well for me because:

- I generally get smaller jobs to do with an already put in place system (I did put myself in charge of refactoring our code but only got around halfway done with it before I... got into something else?)

- Lots of places (not *necessarily* this one but others) will allow you to work on your own time, and I know that for me at least working late nights or early mornings or weekends is actually superior because nobody else is around and there's no distraction

- We (and past places) do scrum, which is really good for ADHDers I think because it means instead of getting roped into hours-long meetings every couple months, you have a 15 minute daily meeting and maybe an hour long planning meeting every other week and I hate meetings soooooooo muuuuuuch it hurts

- Along the same lines daily standups force you to think about what you did the day before, at least fake what you're going to do today, and give you a kind of a deadline you have to meet daily just to be able to say you didn't lie yesterday when you said you were going to do something

- Software devs are also kind of notorious for being ADHD so you're probably not going to be alone

- A robust development apparatus at a company really allows an ADHD person to contribute their strengths (all those little flashes of intuition that make people think we're smart or something) while hiding our weaknesses (poor attention to detail? Hey, that's what QA is there for)

Little Missy
12-15-16, 05:01 PM
I run around inside a 4000 sq foot ranch home from the '50's listening to XM way too loud with an occasional frisbeeing of food or dog cookies.

intothewind
12-17-16, 03:46 AM
I worked in a similar situation. I was essentially the manaber and technician at a biological supply company.

One aspect of the work required packing shipping and labeling boxes....with no one there, I regularly made expensive mistakes(swapped labels, no icepak, etc) I think any job working alone for ADD folk where mistakes are an issue could be trouble

Ive switched over to environmental education for now, which seems to be a decent fit...though the pay ain't great. Aspiring to more in the future but unsure.

fivestar
12-20-16, 02:16 AM
I work on political campaigns. It's perfect for me. Everything is always moving at a million miles an hour with a constant stream of new problems, there's regular hard deadlines (I don't want to be the reason the whole campaign grinds to a halt, right?), and it's something I'm passionate about. In that kind of environment hyperfocus is like a superpower.

The downside is that it's cyclical by nature and the in between campaigns part is rough. I go from running at 100 miles an hour to 0 literally overnight. It's easy to fall into ruts where I feel like I can't get *anything* done, which can be absolutely miserable (I'm sure many of you can relate...).

Still, it's a career where I feel like having ADHD is actually an asset, rather than a hindrance, and I wouldn't trade that for the world.

AnnieGreb
12-20-16, 03:24 AM
I work one day a week at a bicycle shop. If I could make a living at this, it would be perfect. I love bikes; I'm busy all the time and changing activities frequently, I get to self-train on modules of my choosing as new products come out. And I get discounts so I can afford my therapy...cycling is great for ADHD! Especially mountain biking.

I went back to school and studied and finished a master's in social work. The idea was to pick up a profession so I can find a job that can support me. In my last years internship, my supervisor basically yelled at me for 6 straight months. I forgot what she said, I forgot how to fill out forms correctly, I lost track of time and went in 10 minutes late to meetings, I forgot things at home and ended up being late for work, I lost my supervisors phone number from my google account...three times. It took me three times as long to complete my documentation as any other intern. I misplaced things, showed up and forgot to prepare an exercise for a group I was leading, etc. I finally said, "maybe I am too disabled to work"...she said, "maybe you are". I graduated and want to fire myself up to look for a job but I just can't do it.

roflwaffle
12-29-16, 06:32 PM
I'm a business systems analyst at a fortune 500 megacorp. After I graduated, I was unemployed for 4 years, worked low paying jobs for 3 years, and found the job I'm currently in a little over 4 years ago, so it certainly wasn't easy. I didn't know I had ADHD until maybe 2 years ago, and that was only after my wife and I went to marriage counseling and our therapist referred me for a diagnosis. Coping with ADHD certainly isn't easy, and even after all I've been through I'm still spectacularly ineffective about half the time. Working through everything requires dedication and patience in spades.

Fraser_0762
12-29-16, 06:44 PM
Working towards my Diploma in Software Development, then hopefully my degree..... so that's the work path i'm looking to go down. I have no idea how i'm actually going to get there in the end though or if I even have what it takes.

finallyfound10
01-02-17, 03:15 AM
I am a floor/bedside nurse on a busy med-surg unit which is the worst fit for someone with ADHD- Inattentive (IMHO). In Nursing/Healthcare, your chances of getting the kind of job I need which is NOT floor/bedside nursing is to have 1-2 years of floor/bedside nursing experience under your belt.

It's crazy! I am looking for a new job that fits me.

hersenschimmel
01-02-17, 10:13 AM
I'm a self-employed front-end developer/designer. Don't have any usefull degree, accept an highschool art degree. I love to draw and be creative, but it takes to much mental effort and the fact that I never finish what I start made me feel talentless and a nobody over the years, resulting in not doing anything whatsoever.

Front-end development/design is easy for me. The only thing that's difficult is the self-employed part. It started out good, because I had enough connections. But along the years I proofed unreliable in answering phones and emails that I lost out on some good clients and jobs. So the jobs aren't falling in my lap like they used to. Also sending invoices and my bookkeeping in general are a disaster.

I'm now trying to figure out if I should try and remain self-employed, or if I should stop and go as employee once again. I know I was miserable as employee. But it does has its benefits.

distracted3737
01-31-17, 11:59 AM
I finally said, "maybe I am too disabled to work"...she said, "maybe you are". I graduated and want to fire myself up to look for a job but I just can't do it.
this is ridiculous, so we are just supposed to spend our lives on ssdi? what a waste that is.

i find my symptoms come and go: at times i'm reasonably functional and able to keep track of my errors. right now it seems less so. i'm sad to read that no one here has figured it out yet: it appears that what we need is not the right job but rather the right people.

if i'm dealing with any of this cos my mom beat me as a kid i'm so f'in mad rn.

meadd823
02-02-17, 01:24 AM
I am a tech support for medical professionals. I deal mostly with doctors and nurses and other techs.

My heart goes out to you.......



What do you do for a living?

Clinic nurse who can make computers do some strange things. I have dropped papers and flipped the screen image, I clocked in and cause the computer to start smoking - I think it was because I was early.

The tech guy worked with it for over an hour because he could not find any thing wrong with it except to took a month to load.

Any time a computer or printer messes up the IT guys always ask if I have been in the same room:o

Actually Printers are my specialty..........:rolleyes:

Laneless
02-09-17, 12:09 PM
I currently have two jobs while making a huge career transition. I am in office admin/ management where I take care of several businesses including a storage facility, some commercial and residential real estate property, and a construction company. I handle all of the bookkeeping and bank accounts. I do the AP/AR. I am transitioning into my hair stylist career. Big change, I was super bored. So part of the week I'm in the office, Part of the week I'm behind a chair, and part of the week I'm home with my baby.

ToneTone
02-09-17, 03:23 PM
College teacher.

FinallyKnowNow
02-10-17, 05:44 AM
I am a Registered Nurse. It took me 8 years to finish a 4 year degree. Then a non-follow through, on the job, that I was responsible for, could have cost a patient her life, I was diagnosed at age 40. With Dexedrine, I can multitask on the job, am alert for all shifts, and have a ton of energy. I can focus, but I also institute techniques to minimize distractions, and make lists for everything. I have a system, and it works, but if something is off/out of place...even a page torn in a chart....it can be a source of distraction, so I fix it. My co-workers may think I am anal-retentive, but it is a survival tactic, so I minimize distractions and rely on my lists. Everything has to go in my day planner, or it doesn't exist. My husband is very supportive of my forgetfulness, and offers non-judgemental reminders. Now, I have a life, that I didn't know could exist. I didn't know what was wrong. Now, I am almost 1/2 done my master's degree and the future is bright.

BouCoupDinkyDau
08-08-17, 07:36 PM
RN

I make it work. Been working in medicine for over 20 years. I do fine if there is enough novelty from shift to shift (there often is), and not so many problems that I get overwhealmed (there often is as well :(). For me, charting like a madman (b/c my memory is a joke), and using sticky notes and highlighters to prioritize tasks/schedules really helps. For me, having a system is a must.

I also abuse caffeine. ;)

NightKnight
12-06-17, 06:32 PM
For almost 15 years, I've been working in the Security field. It gives me almost everything I need, with minimal stress/anxiety inducing bits.

Nice parts:

- Lots of variety
Most of my job consists of mobile patrol and alarm response. Because of the large area I cover, I go to different places each day, and encounter different people and situations. There's enough excitement/danger to keep it fresh. I have keys for all my sites, which lets me indulge my curiosity, and poke around dark corners and basements of old buildings. Plus, lots of fresh air!

- Working alone
Although it can be good to have a partner during a break & enter, for the most part, I prefer working alone. I don't have to worry about somebody else's personality conflicting with mine, and nobody to judge my work. I can go at my own pace without worrying about keeping up with another person.

- Minimal paperwork
Desk work gives me severe anxiety, and I get antsy very quickly. The amount of writing I need to do is very minimal, and most of what I do have to write is just 10-15 min of typing once in a while. Very lucky that way.

- Excitement!
Yeah it's nothing compared to police/fire kind of stuff, but it's enough to keep me interested and still wanting to do the job all these years later.

Not so nice parts:

- The Potential of more paperwork
Some of the tasks that we handle involve a LOT of desk work and file tracking. A few years ago, we would rotate through this task, and when my turn came around, I'd spend the day having panic/anxiety attacks, and get home completely mentally burned out. Now, the tasks are assigned to specific people, of which I am not one, lucky me!

- Remembering names/faces
I interact with people all day, and even when they are introduced to me, I forget their names almost instantly. Remember details about somebody's description can be very difficult for me as well.

- Boredom
Sometimes there isn't anything happening, or I'm stuck sitting in traffic all day, and the shift just draaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaags...

- Potentially forgetting things
If I forget my flashlight or gloves somewhere, not really a huge deal. But if I set my master keys down somewhere, hooooo boy that's gonna be a big deal. I have to rely on my routine to know where things are. I ALWAYS put my key set in one of three places, so I can figure out quickly if I screwed up and left them somewhere.

So over-all, I'm very lucky to have a job that I can do well, and that (mostly) keeps my interest. I have times where I get sick of it, and wonder why I've wasted my life away, yadda yadda, but those tend to be passing things when I'm already not feeling good. It's a good gig, I don't have to perform many tasks that are weaknesses for me, and it allows me to use my personal strengths, while providing enough variety to keep me occupied.