View Full Version : Vocational Rehab?


FinallyDxed!
11-03-16, 10:16 PM
Have you utilized it?
Experiences?/Opinion?
Benefits?
Costs/cons?
Thank you!:thankyou:

Roxx1980
11-07-16, 11:34 PM
Have you utilized it?
Experiences?/Opinion?
Benefits?
Costs/cons?
Thank you!:thankyou:

I have my Second appointment with them 2-3 months ago-lady said 'not to hold my breath' because they've "wised up to 'that', you know what I mean and I'll still order medical records to try & find something, but I can already tell you won't qualify"..? Um-awful. :confused: :(
::BUT:: I got a postcard in the mail recently with her business card, a letter advising I DO Qualify for help(oh, joy), and a pre-made appointment card with her office address on it. Sorry it's not much info, but I will advise as I hear more :) have you any luck w/them? I hope you find good things so far! :) Good Luck
Roxx

sarahsweets
11-08-16, 05:42 AM
What is vocational rehab?

namazu
11-08-16, 06:36 AM
What is vocational rehab?
Vocational rehab (in the US, anyway) = programs run by states to assist people with disabilities with employment.

For example, here's New Jersey's Vocational Rehabilitation Services page (http://careerconnections.nj.gov/careerconnections/plan/foryou/disable/vocational_rehabilitation_services.shtml).

sarahsweets
11-08-16, 06:56 AM
Vocational rehab (in the US, anyway) = programs run by states to assist people with disabilities with employment.

For example, here's New Jersey's Vocational Rehabilitation Services page (http://careerconnections.nj.gov/careerconnections/plan/foryou/disable/vocational_rehabilitation_services.shtml).

Thanks, youre the best!

casper
11-09-16, 11:57 PM
I used DVR services when I was younger. I was kind of hooked up with them my senior year of high school.

They gave me money for school (college) as long as my grades stayed above a c average. At the time not much help with getting me a job or any kind of support there.

I am sure it has since changed

Unmanagable
11-10-16, 10:57 AM
I was employed at one for a little over 13 years. I witnessed incredible miracles daily, as well as heart breaking scenarios that could have easily been prevented by the client, or by the people who manage the system. People are gonna be people and systems are still gonna be systems, and unfortunately, unpleasantness has the potential to strike anytime and anywhere.

If someone is a strong self-advocate, I feel they can very much make it work. If not, they have advocates available to help guide you through difficulties, but it can be quite an overwhelming process once you're already in deep and struggling.

The place I worked required applicants to have at least two diagnosed disabilities to be considered for enrollment. That may be different by now. Once that was established and verified, there would be various on campus testing methods done based on the client needs/wants to see what all they would qualify to sign up for regarding vocational options.

There was also occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech therapy, talk therapy, recreational therapy, driver's education, etc., etc. available. Definitely a full-service station, so to speak, laid out for you to choose from, if you qualify and put in some serious time and effort, regardless of your needs.

I don't remember any of the financial specifics as I worked directly with the clients and not with any of the number games, besides census. It was a residential environment where students could live on campus and learn, or choose to be a day student if they lived close enough and could provide their own transportation. Ages ranged from 15-50, and beyond.

There were also various support groups, life skills classes, a recreation center, various evening trips for shopping and for fun, and a few community volunteer activities made available for those who wished to participate. At times, participation would be deemed mandatory as part of their program based on counselor requests, sometimes client and/or parent requests, and observed behaviors/struggles.

I was fortunate enough to witness many folks totally flip their life script and leave in a much better inner space than the one they arrived in, and several seemed to make it work once returning home.

Unfortunately, there wasn't much follow-up or support offered once they returned to their community. That was one of the areas sorely lacking in the comprehensive rehab package, in my opinion.

Helping clients learn how to implement all those newly acquired and practiced skills in their real-time environment, which most likely is not nearly as supportive as being on campus surrounded by staff willing to help guide your choices 24/7, would have been priceless to so many.

I think it's like anything else. It can go either way and we can never really know unless we try. Wishing you the best if you decide to try it out.

FinallyDxed!
11-10-16, 06:09 PM
I have my Second appointment with them 2-3 months ago-lady said 'not to hold my breath' because they've "wised up to 'that', you know what I mean and I'll still order medical records to try & find something, but I can already tell you won't qualify"..? Um-awful. :confused: :(
::BUT:: I got a postcard in the mail recently with her business card, a letter advising I DO Qualify for help(oh, joy), and a pre-made appointment card with her office address on it. Sorry it's not much info, but I will advise as I hear more :) have you any luck w/them? I hope you find good things so far! :) Good Luck
Roxx

Sorry your lady sounds annoying/ignorant! I would ask for a different counselor honestly. Last week, my first appointment was very hopeful and she was quite certain that given my anxiety disorders along with the adhd documentation of issues with focusing I was definitely qualified. They are even paying for a neuropsych evaluation to see what else could be going on.

Thanks for responding!!

FinallyDxed!
11-10-16, 06:15 PM
I was employed at one for a little over 13 years. I witnessed incredible miracles daily, as well as heart breaking scenarios that could have easily been prevented by the client, or by the people who manage the system. People are gonna be people and systems are still gonna be systems, and unfortunately, unpleasantness has the potential to strike anytime and anywhere.

If someone is a strong self-advocate, I feel they can very much make it work. If not, they have advocates available to help guide you through difficulties, but it can be quite an overwhelming process once you're already in deep and struggling.

The place I worked required applicants to have at least two diagnosed disabilities to be considered for enrollment. That may be different by now. Once that was established and verified, there would be various on campus testing methods done based on the client needs/wants to see what all they would qualify to sign up for regarding vocational options.

There was also occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech therapy, talk therapy, recreational therapy, driver's education, etc., etc. available. Definitely a full-service station, so to speak, laid out for you to choose from, if you qualify and put in some serious time and effort, regardless of your needs.

I don't remember any of the financial specifics as I worked directly with the clients and not with any of the number games, besides census. It was a residential environment where students could live on campus and learn, or choose to be a day student if they lived close enough and could provide their own transportation. Ages ranged from 15-50, and beyond.

There were also various support groups, life skills classes, a recreation center, various evening trips for shopping and for fun, and a few community volunteer activities made available for those who wished to participate. At times, participation would be deemed mandatory as part of their program based on counselor requests, sometimes client and/or parent requests, and observed behaviors/struggles.

I was fortunate enough to witness many folks totally flip their life script and leave in a much better inner space than the one they arrived in, and several seemed to make it work once returning home.

Unfortunately, there wasn't much follow-up or support offered once they returned to their community. That was one of the areas sorely lacking in the comprehensive rehab package, in my opinion.

Helping clients learn how to implement all those newly acquired and practiced skills in their real-time environment, which most likely is not nearly as supportive as being on campus surrounded by staff willing to help guide your choices 24/7, would have been priceless to so many.

I think it's like anything else. It can go either way and we can never really know unless we try. Wishing you the best if you decide to try it out.


Thanks! That was very informative. it sounds more comprehensive than what I am now involved with though. It sounds like a great program for many actually!

How did you enjoy working there? :) Oh yeah, and what else are considered "disabilities"? Does that differ by state? For example, anxiety disorders? Depression?

namazu
11-10-16, 06:26 PM
Oh yeah, and what else are considered "disabilities"? Does that differ by state? For example, anxiety disorders? Depression?
Services and definitions vary by state.

Vocational rehabilitation services are mostly non-residential programs (as you know), but residential programs may be offered in some states to people with certain disabilities who might benefit from those programs.

In many states, the demand for services far outpaces the supply of counselors and funding, so there is often a "hierarchy" of disabilities or levels of functioning, and priority for services is usually given to people whose disabilities are considered more severe (but who they believe would be able to become gainfully employed with support).

Unmanagable
11-11-16, 01:51 AM
Thanks! That was very informative. it sounds more comprehensive than what I am now involved with though. It sounds like a great program for many actually!

How did you enjoy working there? :) Oh yeah, and what else are considered "disabilities"? Does that differ by state? For example, anxiety disorders? Depression?

Namazu nailed the part about the disability classifications, etc. Thanks, namazu!!

I very much enjoyed working one on one with clients. That's what kept me going back day after day.

I also loved each learning opportunity that came along, and thrived in what I did for at least 11 of those 13 years, and then I brought up some unethical happenings and started the hellish process of addressing them per policy expectations.

I ended up resigning to attempt to maintain my sanity and improve my rapidly declining health that worsened under the stress of addressing admin with ethical issues, working f/t with some overtime, going to school p/t, being a f/t step-mom to two teens, trying to be the good wife, daughter, sister, aunt, and friend while always putting everyone else before myself. *Whew*

It was great while it lasted and I'd likely do it again in a heartbeat if the conditions and hours were user friendly, but not for a state-owned operation of any sort. I have a real hard time with some of the things that are allowed to take place and how well they cover each others' tracks.

That's why I mentioned the significance of being a strong self-advocate. Most staff are kind and conscientious and are doing a job they truly love, and it clearly shows in each interaction, but there's always a few sprinkled in who truly are just there for a paycheck and will half-a** things that could affect your life in a big way.

Sickle
11-11-16, 09:40 AM
It depends on the state. Some states are great. In East Bunglef•••, VT, unless you are blind or in a wheelchair, they tend to do nothing for you. We call it Joke Rehab here. However, I have heard people in other states get a lot of services I wish were available all around.

FinallyDxed!
11-13-16, 09:06 PM
Services and definitions vary by state.

Vocational rehabilitation services are mostly non-residential programs (as you know), but residential programs may be offered in some states to people with certain disabilities who might benefit from those programs.

In many states, the demand for services far outpaces the supply of counselors and funding, so there is often a "hierarchy" of disabilities or levels of functioning, and priority for services is usually given to people whose disabilities are considered more severe (but who they believe would be able to become gainfully employed with support).

I guess they thought that was me. Sad but also grateful. Pray that it will work out!

thanks :-)

FinallyDxed!
11-13-16, 09:09 PM
Namazu nailed the part about the disability classifications, etc. Thanks, namazu!!

I very much enjoyed working one on one with clients. That's what kept me going back day after day.

I also loved each learning opportunity that came along, and thrived in what I did for at least 11 of those 13 years, and then I brought up some unethical happenings and started the hellish process of addressing them per policy expectations.

I ended up resigning to attempt to maintain my sanity and improve my rapidly declining health that worsened under the stress of addressing admin with ethical issues, working f/t with some overtime, going to school p/t, being a f/t step-mom to two teens, trying to be the good wife, daughter, sister, aunt, and friend while always putting everyone else before myself. *Whew*

It was great while it lasted and I'd likely do it again in a heartbeat if the conditions and hours were user friendly, but not for a state-owned operation of any sort. I have a real hard time with some of the things that are allowed to take place and how well they cover each others' tracks.

That's why I mentioned the significance of being a strong self-advocate. Most staff are kind and conscientious and are doing a job they truly love, and it clearly shows in each interaction, but there's always a few sprinkled in who truly are just there for a paycheck and will half-a** things that could affect your life in a big way.

thanks for the heads up! We are told if at any point we are unhappy with a counselor we can speak to a supervisor and or have a different counselor. So far she seems promising.
Do you feel like educating me re: the ethical issues? Did I miss something. Were you referring to the half-******? ;-)

FinallyDxed!
11-13-16, 09:10 PM
It depends on the state. Some states are great. In East Bunglef•••, VT, unless you are blind or in a wheelchair, they tend to do nothing for you. We call it Joke Rehab here. However, I have heard people in other states get a lot of services I wish were available all around.

I'm really sorry to hear that! Maybe it's time for a relocation :-)